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NCL opens bookings on new Cuba and Caribbean cruises unveils summer 2019

NCL opens bookings on new Cuba and Caribbean cruises unveils summer 2019

first_imgNCL opens bookings on new Cuba and Caribbean cruises, unveils summer 2019 program Posted by Travelweek Group Tags: Norwegian Cruise Line Sharecenter_img MIAMI – Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) has opened bookings for its brand new cruises to Cuba and the Caribbean aboard Norwegian Sun, which sails roundtrip from Miami for a limited season this fall.The ship will sail six seven-day cruises on Sundays from Sept. 9 through Oct. 14 to ports that include Havana, Cuba; Great Stirrup Cay, NCL’s private island in the Bahamas; Costa Maya, Mexico; and Harvest Caye, Belize.The nine-day Cuba and Caribbean cruises will expand upon the ship’s seven-day sailings, and also include additional visits to Roatan, Bay Islands, Honduras and Cozumel, Mexico.Those wishing to cross the Panama Canal can do so aboard Norwegian Sun’s 13-day ‘Cuba, Caribbean and the Panama Canal’ cruise, departing from Miami on Oct. 30. While journeying from the Caribbean to Central and South America and back again, guests will visit Puerto Limon, Costa Rica; Cartagena and Santa Marta, Colombia; and Oranjestad, Aruba, among others.NCL has also added a new five-day cruise to Cuba and the Bahamas from Port Canaveral on Sept. 3. The cruise will round out the ship’s season sailing from the Space Coast with an afternoon visit to Key West, Florida before heading to Havana for an overnight stay, followed by a beach day on Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas.Looking ahead to 2019, NCL has also announced summer itineraries featuring five ships sailing in Europe, three cruising to Alaska, two calling on Bermuda, as well as itineraries that include the Bahamas & Florida, the Caribbean, Canada & New England, and the Hawaiian islands.Here are some highlights from summer 2019:ALASKA: Norwegian Bliss, Norwegian Pearl and Norwegian Jewel will all cruise to the Last Frontier. After making its debut in summer 2018, Norwegian Bliss will return for its second Alaska season, sailing new seven-day Glacier Bay voyages departing each Sunday from Seattle, beginning May 5 through Sept. 22, 2019. Norwegian Pearl will sail seven-day Alaska cruises from Seattle departing on Saturdays from May 18 through Sept. 21, while Norwegian Jewel, after a bow-to-stern enhancement in fall 2018, will sail seven-day Glacier Bay northbound and Inside Passage southbound Alaska voyages.BAHAMAS & FLORIDA: Norwegian Dawn will return to her very first homeport of New York City as essentially a new ship, after undergoing bow to stern enhancements in late 2016. Norwegian Dawn will set sail from Manhattan on seven-day cruises to the Bahamas and Florida, bringing guests the best of beaches, theme parks and sunshine from May 25 to August 31, 2019.BERMUDA: Guests sailing from Boston will explore Bermuda from a newer and larger ship, Norwegian Gem, a Jewel-class ship that will homeport in Beantown from March 29 through Nov. 8, 2019. Norwegian Escape, which will moves to New York City for summer 2018, will sail to Bermuda from April 14-Oct. 20, while both Norwegian Gem and Norwegian Escape will offer seven-day cruises to Bermuda featuring three full days in port and two overnight stays.CANADA & NEW ENGLAND: Norwegian Dawn will offer four, seven-day cruises to this spectacular coast line in May and June 2019, with calls in Halifax, Nova Scotia; Saint John, Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick; Bar Harbor and Portland, Maine; and Newport, Rhode Island.CARIBBEAN: As one of the largest ships in the fleet, the 4,000-passenger Norwegian Breakaway will homeport in Miami for ITS summer 2019 season and cruise a mix of Eastern and Western Caribbean itineraries. Norwegian Breakaway’s seven-day Western Caribbean itineraries will visit Roatán, Bay Islands, Honduras; Cozumel and Costa Maya, Mexico; and Harvest Caye, Belize. Norwegian Breakaway’s seven-day Eastern Caribbean itinerary will feature popular ports-of-call including St. Thomas, USVI; Tortola, BVI; Nassau, Bahamas and San Juan, Puerto Rico.EUROPE: From June 7 through August 27, 2019, Norwegian Getaway will sail a variety of nine-day sailings with ports-of-call that include Berlin (Warnemünde), Germany; Tallinn, Estonia; Helsinki, Finland; Stockholm, Sweden; an overnight in St. Petersburg, Russia and a day cruising past the Stockholm Archipelago.The Norwegian Epic will return to Europe in summer 2019 to sail seven-day Western Mediterranean cruises, with embarkation available in either Barcelona and Rome (Civitavecchia), showcasing the best of Italy, France and Spain and departing from May 12 through Nov. 3, 2019.Following an extensive renovation in 2017, Norwegian Jade will spend its summer 2019 season cruising the Greek Isles & Italy from May 12 through Oct. 24, 2019. Ten- and 11-day itineraries from Rome (Civitavecchia) will feature calls in Santorini, Athens (Piraeus), Mykonos, and Crete (Chania), Greece; Valletta, Malta; Messina, Sicily; as well as Naples and Florence/Pisa (Livorno), Italy.Norwegian Star will also sail the Greek Isles and Eastern Mediterranean, offering primarily seven-day cruises with a small selection of nine-, 10-, 11-, and 12-day sailings departing from Venice, Italy from May 12 through Nov. 10, 2019. Calls include Corfu, Santorini, Mykonos and Cephalonia, as well as the Adriatic destinations of Kotor, Montenegro and Dubrovnik, Croatia.Norwegian Spirit will homeport in Southampton for the summer of 2019 and sail a selection of 10-day or longer itineraries journeying to the British Isles, Iceland, Norwegian Fjords, the Arctic Circle, and the Baltics. Full itinerary details will be released when the ship opens for sale in mid-January.HAWAII: Norwegian is the only cruise line that offers a seven-day inter-island itinerary, on the U.S.-flagged Pride of America. The itinerary offers nearly 100 hours of port time in Hawaii’s main islands, including an overnight in Kahului, Maui; a call in Hilo; Kailua, Kona; an overnight in Nãwiliwili, Kauai; and an afternoon cruising past the Nãpali Coast. Norwegian’s Pride of America will depart from Honolulu every Saturday through April 2021. Tuesday, February 13, 2018 << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Karisma expands its Colombia footprint with 290room Irotama Resort

Karisma expands its Colombia footprint with 290room Irotama Resort

first_img Share MIAMI — Karisma’s strategic alliance with the Irotama Resort on Rodadero Beach in Colombia comes into effect Nov. 1, when Karisma will take over management of the beachfront resort.Featuring an upscale all-inclusive experience, renovated rooms and restaurants, and a superior level of service, Irotama Resort is set to become “the destination’s most luxurious and sought-after offering” under Karisma’s management, says the company.Irotama Resort on Rodadero Beach in ColombiaKarisma will manage the Santa Marta resort’s 290 hotel rooms and the operation of 265 condos across four buildings, as well as the upcoming Irotama Reservado.Irotama Resort sits on 23 acres of beachfront land in Colombia’s oldest city with Spanish colonial architecture and mountain ranges as the backdrop. The property includes nine restaurants, four bars, five pools, a spa, fitness centre, kids’ club, and events facilities for up to 1,000 people.Aimed at families, couples and groups, Karisma says it will draw from its Gourmet Inclusive Experience to elevate the all-inclusive offering at Irotama Resort.Irotama Resort“We are proud to continue growing Karisma Hotels & Resorts and to strengthen our presence in Colombia with this new project in picturesque and historic Santa Marta,” said Neil Evans, CEO, Karisma Hotels & Resorts.  “The milestone deal for Karisma to manage Irotama Resort’s four towers and brand-new hotel takes place on the heels of Karisma’s initial success in Colombia with Allure Hotels.  Irotama Resort is a special place and we look forward to further elevating and expanding the property to deliver unforgettable stays for families, couples, weddings and groups from around the world.”More news:  Flights cancelled as British Airways hit by computer problemKarisma’s management deal with Irotama Resort follows the opening and expansion of Allure Hotels by Karisma in Colombia, including Allure Chocolat, Allure Bonbon and Allure Canela in Cartagena.With Irotama Resort, Karisma achieves its goal of owning and / or operating 30 hotels around the world by 2020, says Evans. Travelweek Group Posted by Friday, August 31, 2018 center_img << Previous PostNext Post >> Tags: Columbia, Karisma Hotels & Resorts Karisma expands its Colombia footprint with 290-room Irotama Resortlast_img read more

Book Palace Resorts with ACV to earn 4X the points

Book Palace Resorts with ACV to earn 4X the points

first_img MONTREAL — Air Canada Vacations has a new offer on the table for travel agents: book a package or group to any Palace Resorts and earn 4X ACV&ME points.The offer, which runs from Oct. 22 to Nov. 5, 2018, is valid for travel until April 30, 2019.The points breakdown is as follows:4X 600 points per room for flight-inclusive packages of seven nights or more4X 400 points per room for flight-inclusive packages of 3 to 6 nights4X 300 points for every passenger of a groupParticipating resorts in this promotion include: Beach Palace; Sun Palace; Moon Palace Cancun; Le Blanc Spa Resort Cancun; The Grand at Moon Palace; Cozumel Palace; Isla Mujeres Palace; Playacar Palace; Le Blanc Spa Resort Los Cabos; and Moon Palace Jamaica.ACV&ME loyalty points can be redeemed for Aeroplan Miles, travel vouchers or Visa gift cards. Share Posted by Book Palace Resorts with ACV to earn 4X the points Travelweek Group center_img Tuesday, October 23, 2018 Tags: Air Canada Vacations, Palace Resorts << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Daily December giveaways with ACVs newest agent incentive

Daily December giveaways with ACVs newest agent incentive

first_img TORONTO — Air Canada Vacations’ New Year’s Countdown Calendar offers agents a chance to win ACV & ME Bonus points, future travel vouchers, extra bonus commission, gift cards and air tickets, every day throughout December.Each booking made on the corresponding day will be entered in for the daily giveaway, says the tour operator.Plus, all bookings made with Air Canada Vacations in the month of December will be entered in for the grand prize draw.Air Canada Vacations has partnered with Bahia Principe Hotels and Resorts and will draw for two air tickets in economy class cabin with a seven-night stay for two at one of the all-Inclusive Gran Bahia Principe Hotels and Resorts. The winner will be announced on Jan. 4, 2019. The more agents book, the better their chances to win.“We never want to lose an opportunity to thank our travel partners for their ongoing support, and we think this New Year Countdown Calendar really hits the mark,” says Dana Gain, Senior Director of Sales, Groups & Partnerships at Air Canada Vacations. “It’s a fun idea and gives everyone an equal chance of winning!”More news:  CIE Tours launches first-ever River Cruise CollectionTo learn more see aircanadavacations.com/agents and the attached flyers. Daily December giveaways with ACV’s newest agent incentive Tuesday, December 4, 2018 Share Tags: Agent Incentives, Air Canada Vacations, Bahia Principe Hotels & Resortscenter_img Travelweek Group Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Democrats Abroad

Democrats Abroad

first_imgNo related posts. What is really going on in Iran? Professor Victoria Fontan will speak on the Iran situation, who the international players are and what you should know about their agendas at the DACR meeting on Saturday, May 26, from 9:30 a.m.-noon at the Holiday Inn (third floor) in downtown San José.A {5,000 ($10) contribution will be collected for coffee and the meeting room; reservations are required at cr.democratsabroad@yahoo.com, or call Nelleke at 2279-3553 or 8721-6497. Come and meet democrats; visit democratsabroad.org. U.S. citizens: Register to vote at votefromabroad.org.  Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Crater area access to Rincón de la Vieja Volcano closed to visitors

Crater area access to Rincón de la Vieja Volcano closed to visitors

first_imgFollowing an increase in its volcanic activity, visits to the crater of Rincón de la Vieja Volcano, in the northwestern province of Guanacaste, are prohibited until further notice.Volcanologist Raúl Mora, from the National Seismological Network, explained that the Rincón de la Vieja Volcano, “while not the most active in the country, is a volcano in full activity, which prompted authorities to take preventive measures.”Mora said restricted access to the crater does not affect public access to the national park of the same name, one of northwestern Costa Rica’s main attractions.Rincón de la Vieja and Turrialba are the country’s only two volcanoes with restricted access for tourists. Facebook Comments No related posts.last_img read more

55 companies to offer 3000 bilingual jobs at upcoming CINDE fair

55 companies to offer 3000 bilingual jobs at upcoming CINDE fair

first_imgRelated posts:Job fairs seeking 1,300 employees 12 companies hoping to hire 700 bilingual professionals at job fair Fairs this week offer 5,000 job openings Employers looking to fill 3,000 vacant jobs at CINDE fair next month The 10th edition of the CINDE Job Fair, held Feb. 21-23 at the Antigua Aduana facilities in downtown San José, will feature 55 companies seeking to hire thousands of bilingual workers.The Costa Rican Investment Promotion Agency (CINDE) is organizing the event, which will be free to the public.Companies will be seeking bilingual staff for both technical and professional posts in several areas such as accounting, finance, management, engineering, human resources, software development, technical support, customer service and sales.Candidates should have proficiency in English, German, Portuguese, Italian, French or Mandarin, among others.Companies will accept only digital résumés, preferably in two pages or less, CINDE representative Vanessa Gibson said.Many of the jobs offer flexible schedules and are good opportunities for people wanting to work and study.The job fair takes place from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Sunday.For more information, visit: www.cindejobfair.com. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Electro PranaYama gets groovy at Jazz Café

Electro PranaYama gets groovy at Jazz Café

first_imgRelated posts:Choreography festival returns to National Theater for 31st edition Health Ministry shuts down Chocolate Festival Flamenco performance traces the Spanish diaspora Choreographers Festival begins Thursday at San José’s National Theater Facebook Commentslast_img

Álvaro Ugalde father of Costa Ricas national park system dies at 68

Álvaro Ugalde father of Costa Ricas national park system dies at 68

first_imgRelated posts:Costa Rican climate change film shown in indigenous, arctic region of Canada Small but vocal turnout in Costa Rica for global climate march PHOTO REPORT: University of Costa Rica celebrates World Environment Day Reventazón, Central America’s biggest hydroelectric project, goes online Julio Laínez/The Tico TimesÁlvaro Ugalde, who along with Mario Boza is considered a father of Costa Rica’s world-famous national park system, died Sunday of a heart attack in his home in Heredia, east of San José, a day short of his 69th birthday.Ugalde, though retired from public service, remained active in the effort to preserve Costa Rica’s 26 national parks, focusing particular attention on Rincón de la Vieja in the northwestern province of Guanacaste, where the Costa Rican Electricity Institute (ICE) is pushing plans to exploit geothermal energy, and Corcovado National Park on the Osa Peninsula in southwestern Costa Rica, where gold panners and nearby development threaten the biological integrity of the park.Ugalde, a biologist by training, continued to work with local communities surrounding national parks to teach them the benefits of preserving the land for future generations.Ugalde told the daily La Nación that Corcovado was his favorite national park, and he worried that if the government failed to protect the “jewel of the park system,” Costa Rica’s entire national park system could be at risk.Ugalde also worried that sequestering land inside Rincón de la Vieja as proposed by ICE would set a precedent of removing land from the national park system that would leave any other national park exposed.“If we can’t save Corcovado and Rincón de la Vieja the whole park system could go,” Ugalde said.In the 1970s, Ugalde and Boza began pushing the idea of converting watersheds already protected by ICE to preserve the country’s hydroelectric capacity into national parks. The duo’s idea found powerful patrons in the persons of President Daniel Oduber and former First Lady Karen Olsen, the wife of three-time head of state José “Pepe” Figueres. The first national park, Poás Volcano, was founded in 1970.From the beginning, Ugalde and Boza were confronted with problems such as squatters, gold panners and hunting inside the parks.Also, many of the parks at the beginning were “paper parks,” existing only in theory, as they were private property with no national park service presence.Ugalde worked tirelessly to reverse that trend, inviting wealthy individuals and foundations to see for themselves the wonders of Costa Rica’s wild areas, which netted millions of dollars in donations to buy up in-holdings in the parks.But the idea of national parks was a novel one for Costa Ricans, and Ugalde and Boza had trouble selling it to locals, who saw little benefit, and members of the influential business sector, many of whom saw the national parks as unaffordable luxuries for the third world country.By the early 1980s, Ugalde warned that Costa Rica’s preserved areas remained at risk, saying that because of the high level of deforestation at the time, Costa Rica would be lucky to preserve the national parks as “islands” in a sea of denuded landscape. A photo of Álvaro Ugalde in 1982. LaVerne Coleman/The Tico TimesAll that changed in 1987, however, when then-President Óscar Arias won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to bring peace to the warring factions in Central America.Arias “put Costa Rica on the map,” attracting millions of visitors and sparking a tourism boom that made tourism the No. 1 source of foreign exchange income for the country.The value of the parks as a magnet for tourists became apparent to the point where conservationists are attempting to carry out their vision of connecting the parks by “corridors” of protected areas that would guarantee the preservation of gene pools for the many species endemic to Costa Rica.Now, a total of 166 protected areas, both public and private, protect Costa Rica’s natural resources.Still, to the end of his life, Ugalde said that work remains to guarantee the preservation of the country’s national parks, especially Corcovado, where development pressures and gold panners put it, in the words of Ugalde, “in danger of extinction.”Ugalde said he believed that local communities surrounding national parks still don’t see the benefits of preserving the parks, presenting an enduring challenge to their protection.“If I had hair,” said the bald Ugalde, “I would pull it out for building the parks from the top down, not the bottom up.” Facebook Commentslast_img read more

La horma de mi zapato On love and taxis

La horma de mi zapato On love and taxis

first_imgRelated posts:A love letter to Costa Rica’s second language Costa Rica, The Quiz: How much has your adopted country changed you? On tweeting and twitteando: Should we resist when languages change? Costa Rica, The Quiz: How much has your adopted country changed you? Recommended: Costa Rica, The Quiz – How much has your adopted country changed you?My decade in Costa Rica has been guided, sustained and enlivened by a long-term relationship spanning almost the entire period. Like most any relationship, it’s had its ups and downs, but it’s also been there for me through thick and thin, through rainstorms and heartbreak. As February, the month of love, came to a close, I found myself reflecting on 10 years of heart-to-hearts and steadfast friendship.Oh, I’m sorry. Did you think I was talking about my husband? I could say any of those things about him, too, but I’m referring here to my friends the taxistas: the armchair (or driver’s-seat) philosophers and politicians, the distinguished and the mulleted, the reserved and the jovial. They’ve held my hand – figuratively speaking, of course – through many a learning curve, and taught me almost as many dichos, refranes and obscure street addresses as my husband himself.My love for taxistas is not universal. You roll the dice whenever you close one of those oh-so-fragile (don’t ever, ever slam them!) red doors, just as they roll the dice when picking up a new client. There’s plenty not to love: the reggaetoneros who slouch way down under the weight of their chains and scoot so far back that no one can sit behind them without yogi-style contortion; the ones who call their entire families, text incessantly, or watch movies while driving; the ones who act as though they have a personal vendetta against everyone else on the road, which they very well might; the ones who sigh as if you’re asking them to break a $100 when you provide a ₡2,000 bill for a ride costing ₡1,500. (The subtleties and profound annoyances of taxis and change could inspire many columns.) Rather memorably, there was the guy who, as the cab pulled away into the street, said, “Thank God you hailed my taxi just now. You saved me from going to jail this very night.”An opening line like that one requires an answer, so I obliged. “Oh, yes? How’s that?”He explained that when I flagged him down, he had been on the way to murder his boss. (If you think that that should have prompted me to ask to be let out of the taxi at once, then you clearly haven’t spent much time in San José.) Apparently, the taxi driver and his beloved wife of 15 years had five children, the youngest of whom had a congenital disease and desperately needed a special formula. He had asked his boss to pay him his salary just two days early so he could buy the formula and save his baby’s life, but the coldhearted taxi Mafioso refused. I didn’t believe him, but found the story impressive enough that at the end of the ride I gave him a little extra “for your son.” It was worth every colón when, a month later, I found myself once more in the same driver’s taxi. He clearly didn’t recognize me.“Thank God you hailed my taxi just now,” he said. “You saved me from going to jail this very night.”“I did?” I asked in amazement. “Tell me more!” I enjoyed myself immensely, stringing him along throughout rush-hour traffic that would otherwise have been interminable, before finally observing that it was very strange that the baby who one month earlier had been a three-month-old boy, was now a two-month-old girl, and that his five children had become three. I suggested that a man with such a cruel boss and, apparently, multiple wives and disappearing children, might want to stop procreating quite so vigorously. We spent the rest of the ride in very pleasant silence.So, there are taxistas and there are taxistas. But on the whole, I love the river of amiable, chatty, and well-informed men who have carried me around the city day after day and week after week. When I was a reporter, I never wasted a cab ride. I’d always give the address and, in the next breath, ask his opinion of the bill I’d just learned about or the politician I’d just interviewed. I was rewarded with seas of information, some questionable but most very useful, about corruption, dalliances, promises unfulfilled. I heard just about every opinion under the sun, but almost always with the same basic yearning for a safer, fairer, cleaner Costa Rica – with, of course, better roads.As the years went on, the conversations got a bit more personal, as if the taxi drivers who were shuttling me were a single person I was getting to know over time, and not hundreds of different men. Maybe I was feeling more comfortable in my new home; maybe the years in Costa Rica were slowly loosening my reticent Yankee tongue. Regardless, I usually learned much more than I told. Late-night rides are conducive to confessionals, although the shared pain of a rush-hour odyssey can make fast friends of anyone. I had surprising chats about love, parenthood, infertility, adoption, divorce, death. One man told me about how he came home one night to find all of his belongings on fire on the street. Another, as we listened to Puccini, told me about his lifelong dream to go to the Metropolitan Opera House in New York.Most of all, I learned about language. Showing admiration for one turn of phrase was a sure way to elicit a deluge of instruction. One man waxed poetic about his wife, and asked whether I had found my media naranja – my half-orange. I could infer what this meant, and was charmed. I instantly pictured two half-oranges rolling around the street, looking for each other, straight out of Plato. “I love that,” I said. “How else do Costa Ricans talk about love?”A half-hour later, I’d heard about everything from “the light of my eyes,” to “the sun of my spring,” to tal pa’ cual (this for that – kind of like “two peas in a pod”), to my all-time favorite: la horma de mi zapato. “Horma” is the figure a shoemaker uses to shape or reshape a shoe. It’s a way of saying you’ve found your perfect fit, but I also love the idea of a shoe coming home, bedraggled and misshapen, and draping itself over a nice sturdy wooden shoe-tree like the ones my dad used to use. That’s marriage for you: Sometimes you’re the bedraggled old shoe, and sometimes you’re the sturdy shoe-tree, and you try to avoid both being the old shoe at the same time.That evening, as I got ready to head home from work, I realized with a curse that I’d left my frumpy walking shoes in that man’s taxi. They were too old and cheap to warrant calling the cooperative and tracking down the driver, but it meant that I wouldn’t be able to walk home from work, since I could no more make that trek in my heels than I could fly. I had an outrageously annoying commute home that night, hobbling in my office shoes through the rain, sitting on a series of steamy buses, then plunging into a giant puddle when I finally reached my neighborhood. I felt low, lonely and homesick, as I do whenever San José shows me its claws.I walked up to our garden gate, opened it and went in. There, bedraggled and misshapen, were my walking shoes. Clearly, the taxi driver had found them at some point of the day, realized that only one woman in his daily labors could possibly be gigantic enough to wear such boats, remembered my address, came by and tossed them over the fence, with enough skill to make them land under our outdoor table so they wouldn’t get too wet in the rain. All I could think was: la horma de mi zapato. The form that shapes and reshapes us can be a partner, a child, a parent, a friend. It can be a whole country. It can be a kindly confederacy of taxi drivers, whose wit and wisdom can salvage the grumpiest day.Read previous Maeology columns here.Katherine Stanley Obando is The Tico Times’ arts and entertainment editor. She also is a freelance writer, translator, former teacher and academic director of JumpStart Costa Rica. She lives in San José. Read more from Katherine at “The Dictionary of You,” where she writes about Costa Rican language and culture, and raising a child abroad. “Maeology” is published every other Monday.  Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Tico brewer avenges Trump comments on immigrants

Tico brewer avenges Trump comments on immigrants

first_imgWhile the fallout, and attention, from billionaire Donald Trump’s derogatory statements about Mexican immigrants continues, one Tico living in the United States is giving Trump the proverbial finger — in liquid form.A few months back, Tico brewer Andrés Araya had agreed to produce a house beer for the bar at Trump’s Chicago hotel.“It was an easy-drinking, summer golden ale,” Araya told The Tico Times in a phone interview. His Chicago brewery, 5 Rabbit Cervecería, finished making 60 barrels of it a few weeks before Trump announced his presidential candidacy.When Araya got wind of Trump’s comments suggesting that most Mexican immigrants are drug traffickers and rapists, he talked to his wife and his Mexican business partner, Champi Garza, and they decided to pull out of the deal with the Trump bar.“We didn’t want to do business with people who make those kinds of statements, which go against everything we believe,” Araya said.Instead, 5 Rabbit took the remaining barrels and offered them to restaurants and bars around Chicago under a new, albeit informal, name: “(Spanish expletive starting with ‘C’) tu pelo,” in reference to the billionaire’s mop.It was a hit; they found buyers in a matter of hours.“The support has been overwhelming,” Araya said.He attributed this, in part, to the fact that so many Latinos work in Chicago restaurants and bars.“Latinos are the backbone of this industry,” he said.Still, Araya said he would have had the same reaction if Trump had been talking about Japanese people or people from any other country.“It’s just bad,” Araya said of Trump’s comments, “no matter who it was directed towards.”The Donald hasn’t backed down from his comments, though he has clarified that he means immigrants who cross the border illegally — not all immigrants — are the ones causing problems.At a speech in Las Vegas on Saturday, Trump brought a man on stage whose son was allegedly killed by an undocumented immigrant.But even Trump’s own people are reportedly distancing themselves from his harsh rhetoric. The head of the Republican National Committee reportedly called Trump recently and asked him to tone it down, according to The Washington Post.Or course, plenty of people agree with Trump. Araya said he and his brewery have received angry calls and emails, accusing them of supporting illegal immigration.“We just ignore them,” he said.In the meantime, if you’re in the Chicago area and want to try 5 Rabbit’s rebranded Trump beer, you better hurry up — Araya said they won’t be making another batch. And they certainly won’t be putting the beer’s revised name on any bottles.“It was just a ridiculous insult to a ridiculous situation,” he said of the beer’s avenging nickname.You can, however, buy a commemorative t-shirt. All profits will go to the International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago. The shirts I designed for @5RabbitBrewery are here! They’ll be available at the brewery starting Thursday pic.twitter.com/u4uRnnM27H— Zach Harris (@birdsandkings) July 9, 2015 Related posts:Costa Rica also tells Donald Trump: ‘You’re fired’ Macy’s is latest company to dump defiant Trump For Mexicans, the Donald Trump candidacy is getting scarier Trump tangles with Latino newsman, launches fresh attacks on GOP rivalscenter_img Facebook Commentslast_img read more

To help save Costa Rican rivers head to a picnic

To help save Costa Rican rivers head to a picnic

first_imgCosta Rica boasts extraordinary natural beauty and a reputation as one of the best ecological destinations on Earth. Nevertheless, its rivers are terribly polluted condition, contradicting the country’s “green” image – and a growing movement seeks to change this by encouraging people nationwide to rediscover, and rally around, their neglected hometown rivers.Studies reveal that most Costa Rican rivers, both in urban and coastal territories, are sewage receivers. on the coast, rivers also receive drainage from agricultural and urban watersheds with pesticide residues, organic compounds, detergents, heavy metals and other substances called emerging contaminants. High concentrations of pharmaceutical products and different chemical compounds are also found in these waters. The 2014 State of the Nation report cites a 2011 study in which 56 rivers on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts were evaluated by analyzing fecal coliforms per hundred milliliters (CF / 100 mL) from 1996-2011. Only 42.9% of the rivers were found suitable for swimming or irrigation of vegetables and fruit trees. A 2012 analysis of the Torres River in San José showed 17 million fecal coliform colonies per 100 mL of water in just a 2-kilometer stretch; a clean river would have less than 1,000, and normal metropolitan rivers have up to 5,000. High levels of fecal matter, trash and toxic substances such as mercury are all found in Río Torres. Alberto Font/The Tico TimesThis situation led to the creation of the group Río Urbano in 2012, which seeks to build a new “River Culture” by transforming attitudes toward the country’s rivers. As part of that river-city integration, and as part of the celebration of World Rivers Day, which this year will takes place on Sept. 27, Río Urbano is organizing the first edition of “Picnic on the River Costa Rica.” The campaign’s goal is to draw attention to rivers by reviving the tradition of picnicking along the banks.The idea is that communities organize picnics near rivers all over the country. Each group chooses their own schedule, activities and food. For example, citizens of Turrialba, east of San José, are organizing tire swings on the Pejibaye River. At the Polideportivo Aranjuez along the aforementioned Torres River in San José, free yoga workshops and participatory art activities will take place. Each picnic will be different.International picnics will be held as well, and can be organized by anyone, anywhere.“In most cases picnics abroad, will be organized by some of our [Costa Rican] relatives who wish to support the initiative, but are not in the country. It was based on this interest that we included the possibility of overseas locations,” Alonso Briceño, founder and director of Río Urbano, told The Tico Times“In special cases in El Salvador, Ecuador and Nicaragua, we have made contacts through our allies in those countries. In El Salvador, we have had a great response from several groups working on the recovery of urban rivers in the center of the country. In Nicaragua, we are trying to integrate the initiative with the Guitar Festival in Managua. In Ecuador, there is a movement in the city of Cuenca,” Briceño added. Alberto Font/The Tico TimesSo far, there are approximately 14 rivers where picnics will be held in Costa Rica, including the Virilla, Pejibaye, La Paz, Diriá, Jorco, La Cruz, Ocloro, Torres, and Poás. The international rivers include Tomebamba River in Ecuador, Besos River in Spain, Acelhualte River in El Salvador.To organize your own picnic with your friends and community, check out the event registration form, or visit the Río Urbano Facebook page for more information. Facebook Comments Related posts:National river-picnic events cancelled due to heavy rains Drones could help spot illegal fishing around Costa Rica’s Cocos Island Punk rock band Title Fight to play for the first time in Costa Rica VW says 11 million cars affected globally as scandal widenslast_img read more

UN official Israel slow to relax Gaza blockade

UN official Israel slow to relax Gaza blockade

first_imgIsrael eased the blockade two years ago, allowing the import of many consumer goods, but it continues to bar the export of manufactured goods. Exports, especially to the West Bank on the opposite side of Israel, were once a mainstay of Gaza’s economy.Filippo Grandi, the commissioner general of the U.N. Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees, told The Associated Press that the export ban had “completely obliterated” Gaza’s economy.“The people who really have been penalized are not the people in power in Gaza; it is the common people who are being impoverished by the blockade, but also the business community, which has a greater stake in peace,” Grandi said.He said imports of building materials for U.N. and government construction projects had brought some relief for Gazans but the process of screening those goods was slow and cumbersome.He noted that the blockade had led to a flourishing black market in goods that pass without any security screening through a network of illegal tunnels under Gaza’s border.“We respect their security concerns, but at the same time, every day 10 times more materials come through the tunnels,” Grandi said. “Who checks those?” Comments   Share   He said that the blockade was “not really effective” and it was “very difficult to understand why so much work has to be done in the name of security.”Grandi was in the Australian capital to sign an agreement in which Canberra will provide 90 million Australian dollar ($90 million) over five years to support Palestinian refugees in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Gaza and the West Bank.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) 5 treatments for adult scoliosis Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debates Top Stories New high school in Mesa lets students pick career paths More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements Associated PressCANBERRA, Australia (AP) – The U.N. official responsible for Palestinian refugees said Tuesday that Israel has been too slow to relax its blockade of Gaza, which has devastated the isolated economy and failed to achieve its security goals.Israel and Egypt closed their crossings with Gaza to all but humanitarian aid after the Islamic militant group Hamas violently seized power in the coastal strip in June 2007, exacerbating poverty among the 1.4 million residents. 5 people who need to visit the Ultrastar Multi-tainment Center Four benefits of having a wireless security system Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family Sponsored Stories last_img read more

Russian tycoon Prokhorov founds own party

Russian tycoon Prokhorov founds own party

first_img Sponsored Stories Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debates Top Stories Prokhorov said, however, that he would not be a party member, and that the party would only have 500 members, the smallest membership allowed by the law.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements Men’s health affects baby’s health toocenter_img 4 sleep positions for men and what they mean Comments   Share   Parents, stop beating yourself up MOSCOW (AP) – Mikhail Prokhorov, a Russian tycoon who also contested the recent presidential election, has founded a political party.Prokhorov tweeted on Monday that the party would focus on the regional elections and help Russia’s professional elite make a foray into politics.Prokhorov, who owns the New Jersey Nets basketball team, came in third in the March election, with nearly 8 percent of the vote. The 47-year-old has often been accused of being a Kremlin stooge, a claim he has denied. New high school in Mesa lets students pick career pathslast_img read more

SAfrican government probes Iran bribe allegations

SAfrican government probes Iran bribe allegations

first_imgA Turkish cell phone company, meanwhile, seeks damages from MTN in a civil case filed in the US. Turkcell accuses MTN of bribing officials and bringing other influence to bear to get a license to provide mobile phone service in Iran. MTN has denied Turkcell’s allegations.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family Comments   Share   Top Stories The vital role family plays in society Arizona families, Arizona farms: providing the local community with responsibly produced dairy Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debatescenter_img Sponsored Stories New high school in Mesa lets students pick career paths More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements JOHANNESBURG (AP) – South Africa’s government says it is investigating allegations its former envoy to Iran accepted payments from a South African cell phone company.The foreign affairs department confirmed in response to a question in parliament Wednesday that it was looking into allegations that the former diplomat, Yusuf Saloojee, accepted money from MTN. Saloojee and MTN deny the allegations.South African police announced separately last month they had opened a probe into allegations MTN paid bribes to secure business in Iran. New Year’s resolution: don’t spend another year in a kitchen you don’t likelast_img read more

Auschwitz prisoner and photographer dies at 95

Auschwitz prisoner and photographer dies at 95

first_img Comments   Share   Patients with chronic pain give advice Associated PressWARSAW, Poland (AP) – The images are haunting: naked and emaciated children at Auschwitz standing shoulder-to-shoulder, adult prisoners in striped garb posing for police-style mug shots.One of several photographers to capture such images, Wilhelm Brasse, has died at the age of 95. A Polish photographer who was arrested and sent to Auschwitz early in World War II, he was put to work documenting his fellow prisoners, an emotionally devastating task that tormented him long after his liberation. Sponsored Stories Jaroslaw Mensfelt, a spokesman at the Auschwitz-Birkenau state museum, said that Brasse died on Tuesday in Zywiec, a town in southern Poland.Brasse, who was born in 1917 and was not Jewish, was sent to Auschwitz at 22 as a political prisoner for trying to sneak out of German-occupied Poland in the spring of 1940. Because he had worked before the war in a photography studio in Katowice, in southern Poland, he was put to work in the camp’s photography and identification department.The job helped to save his life, enabling him to get better treatment and food than many others. Because he worked with the SS, the elite Nazi force, he was also kept cleaner “so as not to offend the SS men,” he recalled in an Associated Press interview in 2006.After the war, he had nightmares for years of the Nazi victims he was forced to photograph. Among them were emaciated Jewish girls who were about to undergo cruel medical experiments under the infamous Dr. Josef Mengele.“I didn’t return to my profession, because those Jewish kids, and the naked Jewish girls, constantly flashed before my eyes,” he said. “Even more so because I knew that later, after taking their pictures, they would just go to the gas.” “I had to take close-ups. He said sometimes you will be able to see the whole bone of the jaw, and that I have to do close-ups of it. I did the close-ups, in harsh light, and you could see to the bone,” Brasse said. “Later, my boss called me in, and Dr. Mengele expressed his happiness with the pictures I’d taken, that I’d taken them just as he had needed them to be done.”Brasse said he never had the right to refuse what Mengele or the other Germans demanded.“It was an order, and prisoners didn’t have the right to disagree. I couldn’t say `I won’t do that,’” he recalled in 2006. “I only listened to what I had to do and because I didn’t harm anyone by what I was doing, I tried to address them politely.”(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) In the AP interview, Brasse said believed he took about 40,000 to 50,000 of the identity photographs that the Nazis used to register their prisoners _ part of the Nazi obsession with documenting their work. These pictures are among some of the notorious images associated with the camp.Brasse was not alone in documenting prisoners. Mensfelt said there were other photographers as well and that an estimated 200,000 such pictures were probably taken. Most were destroyed.Now it’s difficult to say which of the surviving photos were Brasses’s because they generally did not carry the photographer’s name. Some he remembered and was able to identify later.At the war’s end, with the Soviet army about to liberate Auschwitz, the Germans ordered the photos destroyed. Brasse and others refused the order and managed to save about 40,000 of them.Though Brasse early on in his captivity was the only professional photographer in the SS documentation office, eventually some other prisoners took over taking ID photos. Brasse was given new assignments, including taking the pictures of prisoner tattoos and pictures for Mengele.Mengele ordered pictures of various prisoners he planned to perform his experiments on, including Jewish twins, dwarfs, stunted people and people with noma, a disease common in the malnourished that can result in the loss of flesh. 3 international destinations to visit in 2019center_img Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Top Stories Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Top ways to honor our heroes on Veterans Daylast_img
Indonesians protest Israels Gaza offensive

Indonesians protest Israels Gaza offensive

first_img Parents, stop beating yourself up JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) – Indonesian police have fired tear gas to push back nearly 200 protesters at the U.S. Embassy in the capital angry over Israel’s offensive against Palestinian militants in Gaza.Members of the Islamic Student Association rallied Wednesday in front of the embassy in Jakarta, waving Palestinian flags and holding banners that read: “Save Palestine from Israel, the terrorist.” Clean energy: Why it matters for Arizona Arizona families, Arizona farms: working to produce high-quality milk Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Jakarta police spokesman Col. Rikwanto said protesters hurled rocks and eggs outside the embassy, forcing the anti-riot squad to fire tear gas to disperse the crowd. Twelve students were detained for questioning. No injuries were reported.The weeklong Israeli offensive against militants in Gaza has killed more than 130 Palestinians. Militant rocket fire into Israel has killed five Israelis.Indonesia, the world’s most populous Muslim nation, is a strong supporter of the Palestinians.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Top Stories Sponsored Stories Comments   Share   Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Daylast_img read more

Cuba cleric Francis criticized church at conclave

Cuba cleric Francis criticized church at conclave

first_img Comments   Share   HAVANA (AP) – Pope Francis issued a strong critique of the church before the College of Cardinals just hours before it selected him as the new pontiff, according to comments published Tuesday by a Roman Catholic magazine in Cuba.According to Havana Cardinal Jaime Ortega, then-Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio urged the Vatican to eschew self-absorption and refocus its energies outward.“The church is called on to emerge from itself and move toward the peripheries, not only geographic but also existential (ones): those of sin, suffering, injustice, ignorance and religious abstention, thought and all misery,” Bergoglio said. 5 people who need to visit the Ultrastar Multi-tainment Center Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Get a lawn your neighbor will be jealous of Top Stories Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix Sponsored Stories Arizona families, Arizona farms: working to produce high-quality milk (Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Ortega said Bergoglio’s comments were made to cardinals as they gathered to select Benedict XVI’s replacement, and reflect his vision of the contemporary Catholic Church. He said Bergoglio later gave him a handwritten version and permission to divulge its contents.“Cardinal Bergoglio made a speech that I thought was masterful, insightful, engaging and true,” Ortega said.Ortega added that the remarks offer insight about the direction in which the new pope could take the church following his March 13 election.In his statements, the future pontiff also warned of the dangers of stagnation.“When the church does not emerge from itself to evangelize, it becomes self-referential and therefore becomes sick. … The evils that, over time, occur in ecclesiastical institutions have their root in self-referentiality, a kind of theological narcissism.” Bergoglio said.He also criticized “a mundane church that lives within itself, of itself and for itself.”Finally Bergoglio said that whoever became the new pope should be “a man who … helps the church to emerge from itself toward the existential outskirts.”Orgeta first revealed Bergoglio’s comments in a weekend Mass, and they were published Tuesday on the website of Palabra Nueva magazine, along with a photo of the two men embracing after Bergoglio had donned the papal white robes and rechristened himself Francis. Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion projectlast_img read more

Lawsuit over American Samoa citizenship dismissed

Lawsuit over American Samoa citizenship dismissed

first_img Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility Four benefits of having a wireless security system New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Arizona families, Arizona farms: providing the local community with responsibly produced dairy Charles Alailima, an attorney for the American Samoa residents and a California group who sued, said he was disappointed the judge did not focus on American Samoa’s unique history and circumstances.He said he will be discussing options for an appeal with his clients.“We’ve known all along that the significant constitutional issues in this case would be decided on appeal, no matter which way the trial judge decided,” he said.The lawsuit’s lead plaintiff, Leneuoti Tuaua, said he doesn’t think the issue should be up to Congress.“(So) long as American Samoa is U.S. soil, I continue to believe that the Constitution guarantees my family the right to citizenship,” he said.Faleomavaega said he agrees with the ruling but isn’t opposed to citizenship for American Samoans.“The decision should be made by the people and not by a court,” he said. “After the people decide they desire citizenship, I can work with Congress on legislation to provide citizenship for persons born in American Samoa.”(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Milstead says best way to stop wrong-way incidents is driving sober Assistant U.S. Attorney Wynne Kelly argued that Congress has the power to determine the naturalization process for potential citizens, and the lawsuit was trying to sidestep that. Kelly represented the federal government and three U.S. State Department officials as defendants.Eni Faleomavaega, the territory’s non-voting delegate to the U.S. House, filed a brief last year arguing that Congress is the proper venue to decide citizenship, not the courts.Leon said in his Wednesday ruling that he agreed with the government’s argument that previous Supreme Court and federal court rulings as well as historical practice trumped the plaintiffs’ assertions.“Federal courts have held over and over again that unincorporated territories are not included within the citizenship clause, and this court sees no reason to do otherwise,” Leon said.“To date, Congress has not seen fit to bestow birthright citizenship upon American Samoa, and in accordance with the law, this court must and will respect that choice,” he said.American Samoa is the only U.S. territory without the birthright of citizenship. Leon said people in the unincorporated territories of Guam, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands got birthright citizenship through various laws years after being acquired by the U.S. That wouldn’t have been necessary if the Constitution granted citizenship to people in unincorporated territories, he said. 0 Comments   Share   PAGO PAGO, American Samoa (AP) – A federal judge in Washington, D.C., is dismissing a lawsuit filed by five American Samoa residents who say people born in the unincorporated U.S. territory should automatically receive U.S. citizenship.U.S. District Judge Richard Leon ruled this week that the 14th Amendment’s citizenship clause doesn’t apply to people born in American Samoa.Immigration laws classify people born in American Samoa as U.S. nationals, but it’s the only U.S. territory where U.S. citizenship is not a birthright. The difference between men and women when it comes to pain Sponsored Stories Top Stories Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvementlast_img read more

Burkina Faso exhumes graves for answers about Sankara death

Burkina Faso exhumes graves for answers about Sankara death

first_imgOUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso (AP) — Nearly 30 years after President Thomas Sankara was killed in a coup as he strived to make his West African country an egalitarian one, his purported grave is being dug up to answer lingering questions about his death.Sankara was a Marxist, anti-imperialist revolutionary who in four years in power in Burkina Faso doubled the number of children in schools, reduced infant mortality, redistributed land from feudal landlords to peasants and planted 10 million trees that still help shade Ouagadougou, the capital. His style was different from other African presidents, ordering ministers to trade in Mercedes for more humble Renaults. New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Sankara’s death at 37 in October 1987 after a coup staged by his once best friend Blaise Compaore has remained shrouded in secrecy.Sankara and his followers were hurriedly buried, and his family and many others in Burkina Faso have for years wanted to know how he was killed, and if, in fact, his body is really in the Dagnoen Cemetery, on the eastern outskirts of Ouagadougou.“We want the truth,” many people chanted Monday outside the cemetery, urging the gendarmerie to let journalists in.“We are here to see who is in the grave and we won’t leave until we know the truth,” said 20-year-old mechanic Ismael Sawadogo among a crowd of people waiting on dark brown earth outside the cemetery. “I was not born when Sankara died but I heard that he was righteous and loves justice.”Medical experts from Burkina Faso and France are overseeing the exhumation of the site where Sankara and the 12 others killed alongside him are said to be buried. They will conduct DNA tests to identify the bodies.At the time of the 1987 coup, Compaore said troops loyal to him uncovered a plot by Sankara to arrest and then execute Compaore and two other members of the ruling National Revolutionary Council. Comments   Share   Sponsored Stories When troops entered the government compound, Sankara pulled out a light machine gun and a pistol and died in an exchange of fire, Compaore said in reports from that year. Compaore has denied being a part of Sankara’s killing.Workers with pickaxes and shovels were seen starting the exhumation Monday morning under tents.“The exhumations have started,” Benewinde Sankara, the lawyer for Sankara’s family, who is not related to the former president, told The Associated Press by telephone from the cemetery.He said that in principal they might begin exhuming Sankara’s grave on Monday, but “the process is going to take time.” Sankara’s family will not attend, he said.Sankara’s widow, Mariam Sankara, has long been fighting for the right to have DNA tests on Sankara’s body to prove the remains are really his, but until last year she was blocked in the courts. The family long has doubted that the Ouagadougou cemetery holds his remains.The impoverished West African country’s name was changed from Upper Volta to Burkina Faso when Compaore and Sankara staged a coup in 1983 and ousted a moderate military faction to launch a leftist revolution. The country had gained independence from France in 1960 and had been under military rule since 1966. Patients with chronic pain give advicecenter_img Top Stories Compaore then staged his own coup in 1987. The reasons for his split with Sankara were never fully explained.A new constitution that was supposed to restore democracy was adopted in 1991. Compaore ruled from then until he was driven from the country by large-scale violent protests in October amid resentment over his bid to remain in power.Interim President Michel Kafando last year said investigations into Sankara’s death would go forward “in the name of national reconciliation.” The exhumation was authorized by the interim government in March.On Monday, hundreds gathered outside the cemetery as the exhumations began.Serge Bambara, a musician known as “Smokey” who is a leader for an activist group called The Citizen’s Broom, said it was an important day. He said he hopes that this will help prove who killed Sankara, so that they can be brought to justice.“This should have been done years ago,” he said. “We are here because we are concerned about the truth … there is hope.”___Associated Press reporter Carley Petesch in Dakar, Senegal contributed to this report.Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility Milstead says best way to stop wrong-way incidents is driving sober The difference between men and women when it comes to pain Arizona families, Arizona farms: working to produce high-quality milklast_img read more