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Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The History of Love Letters

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The History of Love Letters

first_imgNew York City is falling head over heels for A.R. Gurney’s Love Letters, the story of a 50-year correspondence between Melissa Gardner and her childhood-friend-turned-love-interest, Andrew Makepeace Ladd III. Thanks to its simple staging, Gurney’s play, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, has been performed in theater spaces all over the world, from the New York Public Library to Broadway to Carnegie Hall and back again. Put away your iPhone (at least for a minute!) to find out how a touching romance through old-fashioned pen and paper will officially blossom on Broadway beginning September 17, 2014. A.R. Gurney was sick of theater When playwright A.R. Gurney set out to create Love Letters, he initially intended to write a book. “I was thinking, ‘Hell, I’ve had enough of theater for a while,” Gurney told Bomb Magazine. “I sent [Love Letters] to The New Yorker. They sent it right back and said, ‘We don’t publish plays.’” Taking the magazine’s advice, Gurney decided to try rewriting it as a two-person play, where both actors read letters back and forth to one another. In the late ’80s, he was finally ready to perform the piece in front of an audience—but he needed a venue and a leading lady. A new Letter begins In the age of instant communication, iPhones and Twitter, Love Letters is bringing memories of a simpler time to Broadway in 2014, helmed by Tony-winning director Gregory Mosher. The limited engagement includes appearances by Carol Burnett, Alan Alda, Candice Bergen, Stacy Keach, Diana Rigg, Anjelica Huston and Martin Sheen. The first celebrity pair in the new revival is Mia Farrow and Brian Dennehy, who will reprise the role of Andrew. “[Love Letters] is an extraordinary piece,” Dennehy told Today. “You cannot stage a play more simply than this, and yet it’s about everything in life. First love, loss of opportunities, loss of life, loss of love…It’s a beautiful play, and all you do is speak it.” But there’s two things the play won’t include: “Tweets and twerks,” Dennehy joked. “There are no twerks in this play.” Related Shows View Comments Love spread across the world After 96 performances on Broadway, Love Letters closed on January 21, 1990—but the love affair wasn’t over. From local actors to Alec Baldwin, everyone wanted to perform the sweet and heartbreaking play. Engagements mounted with Sigourney Weaver and Jeff Daniels (2007), Charlton Heston and Jean Simmons (1991), Elizabeth Taylor and James Earl Jones (2007) and The Daily Show’s Samantha Bee and Jason Jones (2010). The play was adapted into Urdu and Indian in 1992 and toured throughout Europe, the United States and Pakistan. Next stop, New York City After positive reviews in New England, Gurney and Tillinger teamed up to bring Love Letters to New York City—but instead of finding an empty house, they went after off-Broadway’s Promenade Theatre, which already had a production of Gurney’s The Cocktail Hour playing. Gurney recalled, “I told the producers of The Cocktail Hour, ‘Look, you’re paying for this theater. How about on Monday night putting in Love Letters?’” The idea worked, and Love Letters opened March 27, 1989, featuring Oscar nominee Kathleen Turner (Body Heat) and Rubinstein reprising his role. The run was so successful, Love Letters eventually became a full-scale production, playing eight times a week. It premiered at a library Gurney was scheduled to give a speech at the New York Public Library—but instead, armed with his friend and collaborator, actress Holland Taylor and a stack of letters, the pair read Love Letters to the crowd. “We started at 4:00, and I put in an arbitrary intermission at 5:00, saying, ‘Well, I’m sure a lot of you have to go,’” Gurney recalled. “And nobody wanted to leave! So I figured we had something.”center_img TV was a rocky road A decade after premiering on Broadway, the film rights to Love Letters were purchased by producer Martin Starger. Although at first, Gurney didn’t think a play featuring two actors sitting next to one another at desks would translate to film, he agreed to pen a draft of the screenplay—but Columbia, who initially expressed interest, dropped the project. Universal scooped up the script and requested two more rewrites, this time without Gurney. The film eventually sold to ABC and aired on April 12, 1999, featuring Laura Linney and Stephen Weber. The fully realized TV adaptation included costumes, sets and additional characters. “Gurney has ingeniously altered this tender, sentimental drama to fit the new medum,” said Variety. The Great White Way beckoned The production was so popular, it transferred to Broadway’s Edison Theatre on October 31, 1989—the first week featured Robards with Colleen Dewhurst. “[It was] after they threw that nudie show [Oh! Calcutta!] out of there,” Robards explained in Colleen Dewhurst: Her Autobiography. “It took more time to wash the sh*t off the walls than it did to put up the set.” He also noted that something seemed strange about his co-star: “I knew that something was wrong with Colleen, but no one wanted to talk about it,” Robards said. Dewhurst later announced she had cervical cancer. She refused surgical treatment and died a year later. Love Letters Love moved to New Haven John Tillinger, literary consultant for the Long Wharf Theatre, fell in love with the play and offered to direct the premiere at the New Haven, CT theater company. “’It’s theater down to its most simple level, the spoken word,” Tillinger told The New York Times. His vision for the production included two rules: “[The actors] must not look at each other…And they must not memorize; they must read each letter. This play is not about acting it out.” Love Letters opened in 1988, starring Tony winner John Rubinstein (Pippin, Children of a Lesser God) as Andrew and Joanna Gleason (who had recently won a Tony Award for her performance in Into the Woods) as Melissa. Celebrities flocked to the show As word spread about the simple, haunting and emotional off-Broadway show, more A-listers wanted in on the action. “I was at a party and Elaine Stritch came up to me and said, ‘I want to do your blankety-blank play,’” Gurney told Blouin Artinfo. “I didn’t want to tell her she was too old, so I said, ‘Well, who would you get to play it?’ And she said, ‘I’ve already gotten somebody. Jason Robards.’” More than 50 actors of all ages signed on for limited engagements of Love Letters, including Stockard Channing, Swoosie Kurtz, Christopher Walken, Edward Hermann, Joan Van Ark, Christopher Reeve, John Clark and Joseph Sommer. Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 14, 2014last_img read more

UGA Hay Site.

UGA Hay Site.

first_imgSidney Law didn’t intend to become such a popularguy. But once farmers learned Law could lead them to hay at easy prices, his phone startedringing off the hook.Soon Law, a Washington County agent with the University ofGeorgia Extension Service, had to find a betterway to get the word out. Now his office maintains a World Wide Web site to direct drought-plagued Georgia farmers to the hay they need.”Some local cattlemen were telling me, ‘We’ve been feeding hay all summer,'”Law said. “I just felt sorry for them. They’ve had a rough summer. So I startedlooking for hay sources.”Hot, dry weather from late spring through most of the summer parched Georgia pasturesand other grazing. Georgia farmers normally cut and store hay during the summer to feedlivestock during the winter. But the summer drought has left them facing a seriousshortage of hay.Law found some hay in Kentucky, including some free hay. The agriculture departmentthere worked with Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Tommy Irvin to get the word out. And a newsrelease from Irvin’s agency connected the words “free hay” with Law’sSandersville, Ga., office.”‘Free’ wasn’t quite right,” Law said. “Some Kentucky farmers had somefree hay. But you had to transport it down here. All of the hay had a cost in one way oranother.”The cost was often low, though. And Law’s phone was constantly busy.”The demand for hay information was overwhelming,” said Bill Lambert, assistant dean for extension with the UGACollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”The Internet site is an attempt to ease the burden of calls and improve the flow ofinformation.”The Web site lists the names, addresses and phone numbers of hay sources. It gives thetype of bale and the kind of hay, too, along with the amount available and price. It alsoprovides information on forage fields, pasture for rent and transportation available.Lambert has instructed county agents in all Georgia counties both to direct farmers tothe Web site and to provide hay information to Law’s office to keep the site up-to-date.”We will also be working closely with the Georgia Farm Bureau and other agencies to make this as complete aninformation site as possible,” Lambert said.Farm Bureau will publish a hay directory in October. The sources in it will be listedon the UGA Web site. The directory will be available in all county Farm Bureau andExtension Service offices, too.Locally, Lambert said, county Extension Service agents may work with farmers,businesses and agencies on hay deals. Law, for instance, worked with other WashingtonCounty farm groups to bring two tractor-trailer loads of reduced-price Kentucky hay to 20livestock farmers. Two local trucking companies did the hauling free as a backhaul.”The information flow is beginning to work well,” Law said. “We’rehoping to eventually hear from a lot more sources, especially from those closer by. Somefarmers even in Georgia were able to make hay this summer. The need for hay is strong. Wejust need to help connect that demand with the supply.”last_img read more

Leaves = future compost

Leaves = future compost

first_imgAs winter approaches, leaves turn from green to gold, bronze, red, orange, brown, yellow and crimson. Deciduous trees and shrubs will soon shred their leaves and home landscapers will have to decide what to do with all the fallen leaves. Should you rake them from lawns and flowerbeds and put them in bags for pick up? Should you rake them into piles and safely burn them or make compost? Or should you just take the lazy route and leave them where they fall? Does bagging fallen leaves and sending them to the landfill make sense for long term environmental sustainability while urban landscapes are mulching beds with pine straw from South Georgia? Don’t block the light Leaves that fall on turfgrass lawns should be removed. They may limit the growth of the grass by obstructing light or create conditions that favor disease that will compromise the aesthetic qualities. Leaves that fall on areas that are used to grow shrubs or trees may be ignored and left to benefit the soil. Leaves evolve in environments where no one is there to remove them. In fact, these leaves benefit the environment by adding mineral nutrients, organic matter and mulch. It’s a natural processAnyone who has walked through the woods will see that the soil is highly compressible and very soft. When the organic matter covering the soil surface is disturbed, you will find old leaf litter that is extensively colonized by fungi and other microorganisms that live in the soil. Decomposed organic matter adds a rich dark color to the top few inches of soil. The layers of decomposing organic matter provide habitat for many soil insects and provide water and nutrient holding capacity for plants. This natural mulch layer is part of nature’s way of recycling carbon and other minerals. The best way to mimic nature is to turn leaves into compost. When applied back to the soil, compost can provide many of the benefits that are enjoyed by plants in natural environments. Create layersTo compost leaves, gather them into piles that consist of a layer of leaves 4-inches thick followed by a 1- to 2-inch layer of soil supplemented with organic kitchen waste like vegetable peels, food scraps without meat or fat and any other plant matter or grass clippings.Add another 4 inches of leaves and then another layer of soil and kitchen waste and so on. The pile can be as large or small as you like, but a pile 64 cubic feet will have enough mass to remain warm and allow decomposition to take place throughout most of the winter. Keep the pile moist with occasional watering. The pile can be covered with an old tarp to prevent cooling off.Gets hot, but needs airLeave the pile to decompose naturally. Natural decomposition will take place as a result of the active organisms present in the soil. The pile will create heat and may reach high temperatures that cause steam to come from the pile on cold winter days. To increase oxygen in the air inside the pile, turn the pile once or twice to prevent any anaerobic decomposition that may lead to unpleasant odors. In the spring, the volume should have decreased by half and what remains is dark-colored, crumbly organic soil. When spread over the soil surface this material will provide nutrients to garden and landscape plants.last_img read more

New Year, New You

New Year, New You

first_imgWhen David Forkner of Franklin, N.C., started racing mountain bikes in high school, he wasn’t great. He had some natural talent, no doubt, but Forkner was fine crossing the finish line in the middle of the pack. The race was secondary to the fun.But after attending college at Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C., during which time he raced and served as president of the collegiate cycling team for three years, Forkner decided to get serious about competing. For eight years he raced at the elite level in cat 1 road, pro mountain, and cyclocross. He won a number of regional races, including the NC State Criterium, but soon, it became apparent that his true calling wasn’t racing—it was coaching.“The success I found through my coach led me to realize early in my career that I wanted to help others realize their potential,” writes Forkner on his Carmichael Training Systems profile.Since 2009, Forkner has offered his training services through Carmichael and says that most of his clients aren’t professional riders, though he’s mentored a number of national and world champions. They’re time-crunched, family-oriented, working weekend warriors that want to make what little time they have to ride count.Sound familiar? Let David help with the following bits of advice for getting back into a training routine and sticking with it.10 Tips for Getting Back in the Saddle, and Staying There1. Define your goals clearly.Do you want to lose weight and get in shape? Are you prepping for a regional race? Is there a climb you’ve always wanted to tackle, but never felt fit enough to do it? Determine your goal and don’t compare it to other athlete’s goals or training regimens. “Just because you know someone who trains 20 hours a week, doesn’t mean you should or can,” adds Forkner.2. Make training part of your schedule.Likely the easiest excuse in the book is, “I can’t do _______ because I don’t have the time.” Get up early, stay up late, work out during your lunch break, do whatever it takes to incorporate your training as part of your routine.3. Find what motivates you.“I eat to ride, ride to eat,” Forkner says. “I have a system—the more you ride, the more cookies you get to eat.” So whether it’s cookies or cocktails, find a reward that gets you up and going. Joining group rides or active clubs also helps motivate, especially during the colder, darker days of winter.4. Hold yourself accountable, or hire someone who will.Unless you’re extremely well-versed in the ways of self-discipline, the “you don’t get a cookie if you don’t work out” tactic likely will not be enough to get you off the couch. Hiring a personal trainer, even if only for a few sessions, is an investment of your money and somebody else’s time. “It’s important to have an objective voice to tell you what to do,” says Forkner. “Even as a coach, it’s easy to talk myself out of a workout or to do something more than I should. [Having a coach] is not just for racers. It’s not just for pros. It’s for anyone who just wants to make the most of their time.”5. Increase frequency first, then intensity.Been off the couch for awhile? Don’t push it too hard too fast. Forkner recommends gradually building up time in the saddle to get a base level of fitness. The focus, he says, is not how hard you go but how often you do it—for the first month, maybe it’s four days a week, 90 minutes per session. “From there, I would increase frequency by 10 percent every month until that person is able to do 10—12 hours a week without problem.” Once the consistency and frequency are achieved, that’s when the intensity of the workout increases. Adding intensity too early could result in injury.6. Cross train.Doing the same activity day in and day out might not only get boring but potentially dangerous. “Cycling is a very one-dimensional sport,” says Forkner, so muscle groups in your core and upper body don’t really get that much attention. For peak performance, incorporate strength training and focus on parts of the body you don’t use. Not big on lifting weights? Low-impact, balance-oriented activities like swimming and yoga are great substitutes. Aim for two or three days per week of cross training for a well-rounded fitness profile.7. Train when you’re training, rest when you’re resting.“You don’t want to slog along in this gray zone of always kinda riding hard,” Forkner says. It will be detrimental to your body in the long run. At the very least, take one day off completely. On your other rest days, limit yourself to 60 minutes of active recovery, something that circulates the blood but keeps your heart rate low.8. Climb hills.And climb them frequently. “Don’t just save the big climbs for when you feel like you’re fit,” Forkner says. “You gotta train on them all of the time to get better.” After all, what doesn’t kill you only makes you stronger.spruce-knob-5_lwThe summit of Spruce Knob can often be harsh and arctic-like, perfect training to start the new year. / Photo by Travis Olson, MountainRides, LLC9. Embrace the foam roller.It hurts, and it hurts for a reason, but it’s going to hurt a lot more if you wind up with an overuse injury later in the season. Prevention is key! “Ease into it,” Forkner says. “Roll out the sore muscles 10 or 15 minutes after most rides, three or four days a week. The more frequently you do it, the less overuse issues typically arise.”10. Make mini goals.Preparing to climb 1,000 feet every 10 miles for 100 miles straight (standard protocol in races like the Assault on Mount Mitchell) can seem, well, daunting. Start small and celebrate every step forward. Maybe it’s just a 20-mile ride with only 2,000 feet of elevation. Maybe it’s simply the fact that you didn’t have to hike-a-bike on that one climb that you normally walk. Whatever it is, use it as fuel to keep going.[nextpage title=”Page 2″]The 10 Best/Worst Hill ClimbsHill climbs. It’s a love-hate thing. We love them because they make us stronger. We hate them in the moment. Whether you’re a runner, a walker, or a cyclist, these 10 hills will whip you into shape and crush your soul, but in a good way.Windy Gap Trail, Eton, Ga.Mileage: 4.08 milesElevation gain: 2,300 feetBest part: “Knowing that once you’re done you’ve earned lots of snacks and even a few beers.”Worst part: “Waterbars. So many steep waterbars.” —Andrew Gates, Mulberry Gap Mountainbike GetawayWaterrock Knob, Blue Ridge Parkway, N.C.Mileage: 5 milesElevation gain: 2,500 feetBest part: Catching the sunset from the Waterrock Knob.Worst part: Tourists.Wayah Bald, Franklin, N.C.Mileage: 15.5 milesElevation gain: 5,300 feetBest part: Old school ridgeline trail with mountain views.Worst part: “Miles 11-13. It’s nasty.” —David Forkner, Carmichael Training SystemsFS Road 477 to the top of Bennett Gap Trail, Canton, N.C.Mileage: 3.6 milesElevation gain: 1,475 feetBest part: “The reward! You get to descend one of the fastest, rowdiest pieces of singletrack in western North Carolina.”Worst part: “This climb is unrelenting. It really does not let up from the time you pass the horse stables until you reach the top of Bennett. Just a nasty ol’ gravel grind.” —Cashion Smith, The Bike FarmJohn Smart Trail, Chattanooga, Tenn.Mileage: 1.5 milesElevation gain: 1,500 feetBest part: “It is a great training climb. Anyone preparing for a trail race could use it as a great run-able/speed hike-able segment to prepare your legs for some vertical climb.”Worst part: “It is relentless. Just when you think you are to the top it turns and goes up more and then goes up more.” —David Pharr, Fleet Feet Sports ChattanoogaSpruce Knob, Circleville, W.Va.Mileage: 11.4 milesElevation gain: 2,860 feetBest part: “Once on the summit, cyclists should make sure they take the gravel path to the stone observation tower on the summit. On clear days, the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia can be seen in the distance.”Worst part: “It just keeps going forever. The brutal weather you can run into up there, too. We’ve had -20 wind chill with 70 mph wind gusts. It was blowing people’s tires out from under them.” —Travis Olson, Mountain Rides LLCSugarlands Road, Tucker County, W.Va.Mileage: 4.8 milesElevation gain: 1,805 feetBest part: “The scenic views you can see about three-quarters of the way up the climb.”Worst part: “When you near the top of the 13 percent section and pass by the church while they are having their annual church bazaar and a guy shouts out, ‘You want a hot dog?’”— Rob Stull, Blackwater BikesApple Orchard, Blue Ridge Parkway, Va.Mileage: 13 milesElevation gain: 3,300 feetBest part: Climbing from the lowest (James River) to the highest (Apple Orchard) points along the parkway in Virginia.Worst part: The steady eight percent gradient never lets up.Reddish Knob, Va.Mileage: 8 miles Elevation gain: 4,400 feet Best part: “Making the last right-hand bend to the peak to see the best view in the Valley.”Worst part: “Multiple switchbacks seem to always create a false impression that you have completed the climb, no matter how many times you’ve done it.” —Stephen Proffitt, Shenandoah Bicycle CompanyCanton Avenue, Pittsburgh, Penn.Mileage: 630 feetElevation gain: 230 feetBest part: It’s over quick.Worst part: The average gradient is 33.3 percent.[nextpage title=”Page 3″]Don’t think you can climb Everest? Jeff Reynolds knows you can.In Jeff Reynolds’ 36-year mountaineering career, he’s summited well over 250 peaks. He’d give you an exact number, except he lost count back in ’05. On average, Reynolds summits ten 14,000-foot peaks per year. From the Cordillera Blanca in Peru to the summit of Everest, Reynolds has tackled, and led, some of the world’s most treacherous peaks. He’s organized and led expeditions in 25 countries, including Papua New Guinea, Russia, Mongolia, Chile, and Argentina. At this very moment, Reynolds is scaling some untouched mountain in Antarctica, racking up a handful of first ascents only after ticking off the Vinson Massif, the sole remaining peak Reynolds needs to join the select few who have climbed the Seven Summits.With a climbing vitae like that, would you be surprised to hear that home for Reynolds is right in our backyard of Richmond, Virginia? Or that guiding high-altitude trips for his company S2 Mountaineering is just a side gig—his “real world” job is director of the Division of Enforcement for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality?So why does he do it? And how does he do it? Reynolds hopped on the phone with us before jetting to Antarctica to answer these very questions and prove how you, too, can live in the Blue Ridge and train adequately for conquering Everest.credit-s2mountaineering-himalaya-free_fixWhen did you start climbing?I started climbing when I was 14 during summer camp in Ontario. I grew up in Illinois among the cornfields and dairy cows, so climbing became meaningful to me really quickly.And your alpine experience? How did that all begin?My parents would take me to Colorado to go skiing as a child. Soon I started incorporating my climbing skills into ice climbing, then into ski mountaineering. I met the late Scott Fischer who was part of my encouragement to get into high altitude mountaineering, and everything just came together.Is there any crossover between being an environmental attorney and alpine climbing?There’s this thread in my life about environmental protection and my attraction to the landscape. It’s all part of the same picture. It all connects for me.So why high altitude expeditions? The reason I gravitate toward alpine climbing, it’s where I’m at. When you look around at this high alpine landscape, like the Bolivian or Peruvian Andes, it’s just moving. In terms of the type of fulfillment that gives, it’s spiritual and it’s personal. Climbing has been there to balance out a lot of things and it has been an escape. I feel more secure in the Himalayas on the side of a wall than I do walking down the street in Richmond. I understand it better.In 2012 you led an expedition to the summit of Everest with a 100 percent success rate. How did you do it?I made a point to do all of my conditioning right here in Virginia. There’s this idea that you have to live in the mountains to be a mountaineer, but Charlottesville is at 594 feet. It’s not so much about where you live but what you actually do. Higher peaks may be more accessible in Denver and Seattle, but once you get past 14,000 feet, everyone has to acclimatize anyway.What is your go-to training route here in the Blue Ridge?On the other side of Old Rag, there are over 200 miles of trails. If you start out in the Old Rag parking lot, you can take a circuit that goes all the way over to Buck Hollow, up and down the ridgeline. It’s really cool with a lot of nice elevation gain that’s probably close to 40 miles.Conditions here in Virginia are so different from an alpine environment. How do you prepare for that?I actually like going out in the winter at night here in Virginia, especially when storms are coming in, because no one is out there. It’s counterintuitive for Virginians to go out and trek at night, but it’s magical out there. The wildlife, it’s peaceful, it’s really quiet, and there’s nobody out. It’s really excellent conditioning.You’re 51 years old, a father of two—do you ever ask yourself if the risk is worth the reward?It’s a really good question and it’s hard for people who haven’t been “out there” to understand. You do have kids, you do have responsibility, and yet you assume all this risk. I’ve had this amazing climbing career and I’m still around to talk about it. I’ve had plenty of close calls, I’ve lost friends, I know friends who don’t have limbs anymore, but I feel really humbled that I’m still able to do what I’m doing. I know what I do is controversial and I’ve had people make comments to me about that. The only thing I can say is we all have to do our own thing. I can’t stand playing golf. I wish it would be that easy for me.What is one of your more memorable “close calls?”This was before I had kids. I was out solo on a fourteener in Colorado. I knew a storm was coming in but I thought, ‘Eh, it’s not going to be a problem.’ I did get to the top, but the storm came in faster than I could get down. It was pretty windy and cold, but that wasn’t a big deal. What was a big deal was the sleet. Everything was covered in it. I crawled underneath this corniced area and slept overnight until the sun came up the next day and it melted off the ice. By this time, my then wife, divorced now, no wonder, had already called the sheriff’s office. That was one of those things where I was pushing it a little too far.What advice do you have for our aspiring, Blue Ridge-based mountaineers?It’s not just about physical fitness. It’s about the mental fitness and discipline. If you want to do something bad enough, you’re going to figure out how to do it. It’s fortunate and a little disheartening that we’ve turned mountains into trophies. The trophy is the change we demand in ourselves in order to be successful.[nextpage title=”Page 4″]Fresh Off the GridHave you ever dreamed of quitting your unfulfilling job, buying a souped-up Sprinter van, and hitting the road? Formerly LA-based foodies Megan McDuffie and Michael van Vliet did just that, except with a Ford Focus hatchback. See what they have to say on ditching the grind, living on the road, and eating healthier in the outdoors.Why the Ford Focus? Why not upgrade to a van?Michael: We made it work with the car we had. We thought about motorcycles, bikes, a van, but realizing we didn’t have to have some sorta special adventuremobile to do it, that was a liberating sorta moment.What was that first night on the road like?Megan: We didn’t really have a plan. We had driven from L.A. to Big Sur in the middle of summer on a Saturday night, and we didn’t have camping reservations. All of a sudden we were faced with the fact like maybe we weren’t super prepared.What was the goal behind your blog Fresh off the Grid?Megan: Before this road trip, we camped a lot and we were tired of feeling like we had to change what we ate because we were camping. Eating healthfully was something that was always important to us, but your typical camp food is not what I would categorize as healthy—beans, burgers, brats. We decided to start Fresh off the Grid to adapt camp food to something that was a little healthier and more exciting.You would think outdoorsy people eat healthy at home and in the woods, right?Michael: Backpackers in particular will spend thousands of dollars on gear to shave a couple ounces off but they won’t spend a dime on better food. They might have a better experience if they spent the money and ate a little better.Any memorable moments when things didn’t pan out as planned?Megan: We had been trying to make this pumpkin curry with lentils, and we kept messing it up. The lentils would end up crunchy, but that was our dinner for the night so we had to keep eating it. On the fourth or fifth attempt, we couldn’t handle it anymore. We threw it out, drove an hour back into town, and got KFC that night.Check out Michael and Megan’s 10 tried-and-true tips for making camp food delicious and nutritious.1. Experiment at home.The main thing that makes cooking more attainable is practice.2. Have a plan.Don’t just show up to the campground and wing it. That’s how people get sucked into the burgers-and-brats menu.3. If you’re going to carb out, keep it balanced.Oatmeal is a bowl of carbs that burns off by 10:30 and you’re starving again. But if you add some seeds and fresh fruit, it starts to balance itself out. So if mac ‘n’ cheese is on the menu tonight, toss in some veggies.4. Use tough vegetables.Select heartier vegetables that can withstand rough and tumble camping. Sweet potatoes, cabbage, and zucchini are good. Tomatoes and avocado? Not so much.5. Cook your delicates first.Use your delicate fruits and vegetables during the first day or two of your camping trip. Warm cars and cooler water never did any vegetable much good.6. Buy canned vegetables.Most every vegetable these days comes canned. Great for car camping, not ideal for backpacking.7. Find substitutes for your favorite products.Try ghee instead of butter, powdered milk for carton milk, tomato powder for tomato paste. A number of brands make dehydrated vegetables.8. Don’t short yourself on utensils.“A lot of people think they can just get away with a little Swiss Army knife,” says Megan. “If you don’t use it at home, don’t use it camping.”9. Find your favorite spiceS.It adds so much to a meal. Even a little salt and pepper can be a saving culinary grace.10. Put olive oil on everything.Hey backpackers—olive oil has 119 calories per 1 tablespoon. ‘Nuff said.Check out Megan and Michael’s adventures and recipes on their blog Fresh Off the Grid and on Instagram @freshoffthegrid.Related:last_img read more

Sveta Nedelja abolished surtax and consumption tax, as well as the collection of utility fees for hotels, apartment settlements and camps

Sveta Nedelja abolished surtax and consumption tax, as well as the collection of utility fees for hotels, apartment settlements and camps

first_imgWith these moves, Sveta Nedelja made the biggest tax relief carried out by a local self-government unit in the Republic of Croatia. Therefore, in addition to supporting all entrepreneurs, as well as the tourism sector, this measure is certainly aimed at stopping emigration in Sveta Nedelja, because according to the calculation in a family with several employees, the annual surtax was paid up to several thousand cinemas. household budget. In 2018, around HRK 7 million was collected from the mentioned taxes in the budget. This amount will remain available to our citizens in the future, said Deputy Mayor Davor Nađi and added: “The abolition of consumption taxes and utility fees for hotels, apartment complexes and camps will certainly encourage investment and employment in the field of tourism and catering, which in Sveta Nedelja creates the preconditions for significant development of tourism as the strongest industry in Croatia. It should also be noted that the utility fee for hotels and camps is the only type of utility fee that is calculated according to the percentage of income, which is really not fair since it is calculated for everyone else according to the square footage. ” pointed out Deputy Mayor Davor Nađi At the 19th regular session of the city of Sveta Nedelja, the Decision on city taxes was passed abolished surtax in Holy Week (from 6% to 0%) and consumption tax, and the Decision on the amendment of the Decision on the utility fee was accepted abolishes the collection of utility fees for hotels, apartment settlements and camps in the area of ​​Sveta Nedelja, in order to develop tourism, the City of Sveta Nedelja announced.center_img Cover photo: TZ Sveta Nedeljalast_img read more

Bay beauty’s new look on offer in Manly

Bay beauty’s new look on offer in Manly

first_imgThe home at 78 Nelson Pde, Manly. THIS newly renovated home is close to the esplanade and the shops and cafes of Manly Village. The property at 78 Nelson Pde, Manly has four bedrooms, two bathrooms and multiple living spaces spread across two light-filled levels. Marketing agent David Lazarus, of Belle Property Manly, said the home had a fresh white colour scheme and polished timber floors upstairs. The home at 78 Nelson Pde, Manly.The home comes with ducted airconditioning, solar power and water tank.The property has been freshly painted throughout and has plenty of storage across the two spacious levels.“This stylish family home is situated in one of Manly’s blue chip locations,” Mr Lazarus said.The home is close to public transport and Manly State School. The home at 78 Nelson Pde, Manly.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020There is also a single lockup garage and a single carport. Internal stairs lead up to the open-plan living, dining and kitchen area, which opens through sliding doors to the covered deck with views over Manly and Moreton Bay.The kitchen has an island bench, stainless-steel appliances and plenty of cupboard space. The home at 78 Nelson Pde, Manly.On the ground floor there is a mixed of tiled flooring and new carpets.There are two bedrooms, with a walk-in robe to one and a built-in robe to the second, and a bathroom with shower and bath.The downstairs family room opens to the covered patio, which overlooks the in-ground swimming pool. The home at 78 Nelson Pde, Manly.The master bedroom has a walk-in robe and an ensuite with shower and separate toilet. There is also another bedroom, with built-in robe, and a toilet. Outside there are established, low-maintenance gardens and a shed.last_img read more

Woman nabbed over ‘drugs’

Woman nabbed over ‘drugs’

first_imgBACOLOD City – Policearrested a woman facing illegal drug charges in Barangay 2, Kabankalan City,Negros Occidental. She wasidentified as 39-year Rosalie Astrologo, Negros Occidental, a police reportshowed. Officers of theKabankalan City police station served the warrant issued by Judge RodneyMagbanua of the Regional Trial Court Branch 61 dated Nov. 12, 2019. The courtrecommended a P200,000 bail bond for Astrologo’s temporary liberty./PNcenter_img The suspect wasdetained. Astrologo –resident of Barangay Bacuyangan, Hinobaan – was caught on the strength of anarrest warrant around 1:25 p.m. Jan. 10, it added. last_img read more

German legend appointed Bayern Munich assistant manager

German legend appointed Bayern Munich assistant manager

first_imgRead Also: Man City star breaks lockdown rules three times in 24 hours“It feels very good,” Klose, who has signed a deal until 2023, said. “I’m very much looking forward to the task. Hansi Flick and I have known each other very well since our years together in the German national team. We trust each other, both professionally and personally.“For me this is the next step in my career as a coach. I hope that I can use my experience to make an important contribution in helping FC Bayern achieve our sporting goals”.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Miroslav Klose has been appointed as Hansi Flick’s assistant manager at Bayern Munich, the former striker set to be promoted from his role as U17s coach at the start of next season.Advertisement Klose and Flick have enjoyed a close working relationship for years, with the former scoring two of his 71 Germany goals to help Die Mannschaft to their fourth FIFA World Cup in 2014, when Flick was assistant to Joachim Löw.“With his experience as a former professional at the highest international level, Miro is the perfect addition to our coaching team,” Flick said.Miroslav Klose will be promoted from Bayern’s U17s for next season“We have known and appreciated each other for a very long time and were able to celebrate great successes together with the national team.”Klose – who also scored 53 goals in 150 games in all competitions for Bayern as a striker between 2007 and 2011 – was appointed as the club’s U17 coach in May 2018 and led them to the South/Southwest league title last season. Loading… Promoted ContentTop 10 TV Friends Who Used To Be Enemies14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?15 Celebs Who Fell From Grace With Their CareersTop 10 Must-Know Facts About Ivanka Trump10 Extremely Gorgeous Asian Actresses6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A VegetarianWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?last_img read more

Spooker gives Cole IMCA Modified bookend win at Tri-State

Spooker gives Cole IMCA Modified bookend win at Tri-State

first_imgPOCOLA, Okla. (Oct. 17) – The bookend win to Tate Cole’s 2015 campaign came Saturday night in the Tri-State Speedway Spooker finale.Cole started outside the front row, led all 30 laps and went home with $2,000 for taking the Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified checkers.He’d also led the distance in topping the season-opening Cecil Harlan Memorial Kegger and had another seven feature wins in 2015 at Pocola.“It was exciting to be able to win another big race. It was just a fun all-around deal,” the new 2016 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifier said. “We knew we had a good car but never thought we’d win that many times and both big races.”Running a lane off the bottom, Cole was into heavy lapped traffic just after midway. A handful of cautions interrupted the main event, the last time with five laps left.Cole pulled away again to win by nearly a straightaway over Shannon Reheard.Johnny Bone Jr., 10th starting Nick Lawrence and 14th starting Zane Hunter rounded out the top five.Michael Ables started 15th and ended in sixth.“I was excited to win this race and get my name on next year’s Spooker T-shirt. My wife was hap­pier that I’d won $2,000,” said Cole. “Another thing this win did was give us momentum going into the (Oct. 22-24) $5,000 to win OctoberFest at Outlaw Motor Speedway.”Feature results – 1. Tate Cole; 2. Shannon Reheard; 3. Johnny Bone Jr.; 4. Nick Lawrence; 5. Zane Hunter; 6. Michael Ables; 7. Van Gemmill; 8. Troy Schaberg; 9. Larry Bratti; 10. Ted Bay­outh; 11. Jason Payton; 12. Aaron Scroggins; 13. Shawn Pinkerton; 14. William Gould; 15. Randi Goins; 16. Jake Davis; 17. Lonny Flanagan; 18. Raymond Sambrano.last_img read more

Dirt Defender, Stephenville Starter combine to give new IMCA random drawing cash prize

Dirt Defender, Stephenville Starter combine to give new IMCA random drawing cash prize

first_imgRED OAK, Texas – Two Texas companies ante up the $500 cash prize awaiting the winner of a random drawing to be held following the 2017 IMCA point season.Top drivers in national point races for IMCA Modifieds, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMods and Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods all get a free pair of vented mud covers manufactured by Dirt Defender, of Red Oak.Dirt Defender and Stephenville Starter of Stephenville each give $250 to a randomly selected driver in one of those divisions who wins 10 or more weekly heat races and submits a photo of their car displaying use of two Dirt Defender mud covers.That driver also receives a free Stephenville Starter and those awards will be presented during the IMCA national banquet in November.Stephenville Starter returns as title sponsor and provides a portion of the point fund for the Hobby Stock race of champions, to be held Sept. 9 during the IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s.Modified, Stock Car, Hobby Stock and Northern SportMod race of champions winners and the Southern SportMod champion at Super Nationals all receive starters.“We are constantly looking for trends with our products so drivers know they are getting the best and safest products possible. Due to several companies trying to mimic our products, we feel that our changes in 2017 will not only benefit IMCA drivers and spectators but also help our company to identify our products,” said Billy Vest, co-owner with Dennis Bissonnette of Dirt Defender. “Our wheel covers have been stamped with Made in the USA along with our trademark Spartan logo.“We’ve also adjusted it to fit the changes some wheel manufactures have made this year. As most people know, we made our expansion ring in white for driver safety and for us to recognize any issues with our ring,” he added. “This year, we have changed our ring color to neon yellow in order to distinguish ours from the ones made by other companies. As always, our company thanks each and every person, team, company and dealer for all they do to support us.”Information about Stephenville Starter-made products is available by calling 254 965-7890, and about Dirt Defender wheel covers calling 469 556-4612 and on Facebook.Stephenville Starter is in its ninth year of IMCA sponsorship, Dirt Defender its third.“This is a great new twist on a program where two companies work together to give back to rac­ers, “ commented IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder. “Drivers already are encouraged to sub­mit photos of their cars to verify 10 heat race wins, and if they also can submit one with Dirt De­fender mud covers in place it could potentially be worth a very nice cash bonus.”last_img read more