Report: Inmate drug program flawed

Report: Inmate drug program flawed

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SACRAMENTO – California’s prison system is wasting $143 million a year on flawed drug-treatment programs for addicted inmates and parolees, the state inspector general said Wednesday. University studies found no sign that the programs reduced the number of inmates returning to prison. Yet the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation failed to make changes even after spending of millions of dollars on repeated studies that revealed shortcomings, Inspector General Matthew Cate said in a report. The department mixed addicts with other inmates, effectively ruining attempts to create a community of addicts who would support one another while they received treatment, Cate said. The department also let private counselors provide less intensive treatment than was required by their state contracts, Cate said. Ongoing problems with the unit prompted Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to announce Tuesday that he was creating a Division of Addiction and Recovery Services within the corrections department. He appointed as director Kathleen Jett, who has been director of the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs since 2000. The inspector general praised the restructuring. National studies found a 7percent reduction in new criminal offenses by addicts who received proper treatment, Cate said.last_img

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