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Leona Lewis Set to Leave Broadway’s Cats this Fall

Leona Lewis Set to Leave Broadway’s Cats this Fall

first_imgLeona Lewis in ‘Cats'(Photo: Matthew Murphy) View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 30, 2017center_img Cats Leona Lewis can currently be seen at the Neil Simon Theatre as Grizabella in Cats, but soon, she must think of a new life (and she mustn’t give in). The Grammy nominee and X Factor winner recently took to Twitter to announce she will leave the revival in less than a month.Lewis will belt out her last “Memory” on October 9. “Time has flown by,” Lewis wrote. “I’ll miss my @CatsBroadway family like crazy!”No word yet on who will step into Grizabella’s paws following Lewis’ final bow.last_img read more

UGA Hay Site.

UGA Hay Site.

first_imgSidney Law didn’t intend to become such a popularguy. But once farmers learned Law could lead them to hay at easy prices, his phone startedringing off the hook.Soon Law, a Washington County agent with the University ofGeorgia Extension Service, had to find a betterway to get the word out. Now his office maintains a World Wide Web site to direct drought-plagued Georgia farmers to the hay they need.”Some local cattlemen were telling me, ‘We’ve been feeding hay all summer,'”Law said. “I just felt sorry for them. They’ve had a rough summer. So I startedlooking for hay sources.”Hot, dry weather from late spring through most of the summer parched Georgia pasturesand other grazing. Georgia farmers normally cut and store hay during the summer to feedlivestock during the winter. But the summer drought has left them facing a seriousshortage of hay.Law found some hay in Kentucky, including some free hay. The agriculture departmentthere worked with Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Tommy Irvin to get the word out. And a newsrelease from Irvin’s agency connected the words “free hay” with Law’sSandersville, Ga., office.”‘Free’ wasn’t quite right,” Law said. “Some Kentucky farmers had somefree hay. But you had to transport it down here. All of the hay had a cost in one way oranother.”The cost was often low, though. And Law’s phone was constantly busy.”The demand for hay information was overwhelming,” said Bill Lambert, assistant dean for extension with the UGACollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”The Internet site is an attempt to ease the burden of calls and improve the flow ofinformation.”The Web site lists the names, addresses and phone numbers of hay sources. It gives thetype of bale and the kind of hay, too, along with the amount available and price. It alsoprovides information on forage fields, pasture for rent and transportation available.Lambert has instructed county agents in all Georgia counties both to direct farmers tothe Web site and to provide hay information to Law’s office to keep the site up-to-date.”We will also be working closely with the Georgia Farm Bureau and other agencies to make this as complete aninformation site as possible,” Lambert said.Farm Bureau will publish a hay directory in October. The sources in it will be listedon the UGA Web site. The directory will be available in all county Farm Bureau andExtension Service offices, too.Locally, Lambert said, county Extension Service agents may work with farmers,businesses and agencies on hay deals. Law, for instance, worked with other WashingtonCounty farm groups to bring two tractor-trailer loads of reduced-price Kentucky hay to 20livestock farmers. Two local trucking companies did the hauling free as a backhaul.”The information flow is beginning to work well,” Law said. “We’rehoping to eventually hear from a lot more sources, especially from those closer by. Somefarmers even in Georgia were able to make hay this summer. The need for hay is strong. Wejust need to help connect that demand with the supply.”last_img read more

Diabetes 2 more common.

Diabetes 2 more common.

first_imgWhich Kind of Diabetes? Type 1: “If we can influence our children’s behavior, we can reduce the chance they’ll get type 2 diabetes,” Freeman said. “We owe it to our children to do our part.”More informationYou can find more on diabetes from these Web sites: In just the past 30 years, the percentage of children and teens who are overweight has more than doubled. A University of Georgia scientist said many overweight children are among a growing group with type 2 diabetes. “That’s an unusual type of diabetes for children to have,” said Janine Freeman, an Extension Service nutrition specialist with the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “Type 2 is usually associated with overweight adults.”Type 2 diabetes can be managed by healthy eating and regular physical activity, Freeman said. But it may require medication. Insulin treatment is used if other changes don’t bring the diabetes under control.More overweight kidsMost of the increase in overweight children has been since the late 1970s. It coincides with the rise of video and computer games and other computer uses.Freeman said children spend an average of almost three and a half hours every day watching television. “Television viewing plays a major role in how much — or how little — activity children get,” she said.That lack of physical activity is one of many reasons more children and teens are overweight.Another big reason is poor eating habits. More than 84 percent of children and teens eat too much fat. More than 91 percent eat too much saturated fat. Almost one-third of all children and teens eat less than one serving per day of a nonfried vegetable. “Since obesity is a big diabetes factor, we need to try to influence what children eat and how much activity they get,” Freeman said. “We know that in this age group, it’s sometimes hard to get children to do what’s best for their health.” The body becomes resistant to its own insulin. Occurs mostly in overweight adults. Can be managed by healthy eating and regular physical activity, but may require medication. Insulin treatment is used if these changes don’ot bring the diabetes under control. < http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/index.htm> < http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/diabetes.htm > < http://www.diabetes.org/ > Set a good example. Children look to their parents and adults close to them for examples in eating and physical activity habits. If you want the kids close to you to make healthy choices, you must also. Increase the entire family’s activity level. Make sure everyone has a balanced diet. Type 2: She said studies show minority children have a much higher risk of the disease than Caucasian children. Though scientists don’t know why, they believe it’s partly because resistance to insulin varies among races at different levels of obesity. Advice for preventionBut regardless of race, Freeman said staying healthy and within healthy weight ranges can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in children. To help, she offers this advice. Requires insulin by injection or infusion pump to treat. Limit television or computer time. Set an hour of play time for every half-hour in front of the TV, computer or video game set. Make sure outdoor play equipment is handy and safe. Keep all kinds of balls, safe bicycles or other sports gear ready. Notice which activities kids enjoy and encourage them to do them more. Try to find community activities or leagues where they can play with others. Playing with friends can also help build social and leadership skills. Play with them. Start family or neighborhood ball games. Go walking or biking together. “Children tend to be like their parents,” Freeman said. “Getting them to be more active may mean you need to be more active.” Skip the cookie, soft drink and chip aisles at the grocery store. Stock up on more healthful alternatives like fresh fruits and vegetables. Though fruit drinks are full of vitamins, they pack a lot of sugar and calories. Eat at home more. Freeman said it’s hard to avoid high-fat food if you eat at fast-food restaurants often. Serve lean meats and lots of fresh vegetables. Try to limit high-fat cooking, too. The pancreas stops producing insulin. Usually occurs in children and young adults who are not overweight. last_img read more

Leaves = future compost

Leaves = future compost

first_imgAs winter approaches, leaves turn from green to gold, bronze, red, orange, brown, yellow and crimson. Deciduous trees and shrubs will soon shred their leaves and home landscapers will have to decide what to do with all the fallen leaves. Should you rake them from lawns and flowerbeds and put them in bags for pick up? Should you rake them into piles and safely burn them or make compost? Or should you just take the lazy route and leave them where they fall? Does bagging fallen leaves and sending them to the landfill make sense for long term environmental sustainability while urban landscapes are mulching beds with pine straw from South Georgia? Don’t block the light Leaves that fall on turfgrass lawns should be removed. They may limit the growth of the grass by obstructing light or create conditions that favor disease that will compromise the aesthetic qualities. Leaves that fall on areas that are used to grow shrubs or trees may be ignored and left to benefit the soil. Leaves evolve in environments where no one is there to remove them. In fact, these leaves benefit the environment by adding mineral nutrients, organic matter and mulch. It’s a natural processAnyone who has walked through the woods will see that the soil is highly compressible and very soft. When the organic matter covering the soil surface is disturbed, you will find old leaf litter that is extensively colonized by fungi and other microorganisms that live in the soil. Decomposed organic matter adds a rich dark color to the top few inches of soil. The layers of decomposing organic matter provide habitat for many soil insects and provide water and nutrient holding capacity for plants. This natural mulch layer is part of nature’s way of recycling carbon and other minerals. The best way to mimic nature is to turn leaves into compost. When applied back to the soil, compost can provide many of the benefits that are enjoyed by plants in natural environments. Create layersTo compost leaves, gather them into piles that consist of a layer of leaves 4-inches thick followed by a 1- to 2-inch layer of soil supplemented with organic kitchen waste like vegetable peels, food scraps without meat or fat and any other plant matter or grass clippings.Add another 4 inches of leaves and then another layer of soil and kitchen waste and so on. The pile can be as large or small as you like, but a pile 64 cubic feet will have enough mass to remain warm and allow decomposition to take place throughout most of the winter. Keep the pile moist with occasional watering. The pile can be covered with an old tarp to prevent cooling off.Gets hot, but needs airLeave the pile to decompose naturally. Natural decomposition will take place as a result of the active organisms present in the soil. The pile will create heat and may reach high temperatures that cause steam to come from the pile on cold winter days. To increase oxygen in the air inside the pile, turn the pile once or twice to prevent any anaerobic decomposition that may lead to unpleasant odors. In the spring, the volume should have decreased by half and what remains is dark-colored, crumbly organic soil. When spread over the soil surface this material will provide nutrients to garden and landscape plants.last_img read more

Georgia’s biofuel future

Georgia’s biofuel future

first_img* In 2011 ethanol reduced wholesale gasoline prices by an average of $1.09 per gallon.* Regular grade gasoline prices averaged $3.52 per gallon in 2011, but would have been closer to $4.60 per gallon without the inclusion of more than 13 billion gallons of lower-priced ethanol.* The average American household consumed 1,124 gallons of gasoline in 2011, meaning ethanol reduced average household spending at the pump by more than $1,200.* Since 2000 ethanol has kept gasoline prices an average of $0.29 per gallon cheaper than they otherwise would have been.* Based on the $0.29-per-gallon average annual savings, ethanol has helped save American drivers and the economy more than $477 billion in gasoline expenditures since 2000 – an average of $39.8 billion a year.Ethanol plants shutting downAs I write this, several corn ethanol plants in the Midwest are shutting down due to the high cost of corn. The one ethanol plant in south Georgia continues to operate under bankruptcy. Corn prices continue to rise as hot, dry conditions grip the Corn Belt. So even though using ethanol as a fuel has lots of economic advantages, producing ethanol from corn is not the long-term answer to our energy problems. Georgia’s biofuel future is dependent upon finding ways to use other feedstocks to make energy. One promising development came from Tulane University, which announced in the late summer of 2011 the discovery of a Clostridium-genus bacterium that can convert nearly any form of cellulose into isobutanol. Butanol has some advantages over ethanol. It better tolerates water contamination and is less corrosive than ethanol. It is more suitable for distribution through existing gasoline pipelines, but at around $4.00 per gallon, the prices for isobutanol far outstrip the $2.20 per gallon pricing for fuel ethanol. Some corn ethanol plants are looking at the option of converting to biobutanol production. DuPont and BP plan to make biobutanol the first product of their joint effort to develop, produce and market next-generation biofuels. In Europe the Swiss company Butalco is developing genetically modified yeasts for the production of biobutanol from cellulosic materials.Our bioenergy experts know a lot more than I do about these developments and trends, but from my perspective, UGA Extension needs to be prepared to help advise our growers and agribusinesses on how to best capitalize on this major change looming over the horizon. The biofuel era is coming to Georgia. A couple of years ago, I pushed to have a statewide University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent training initiative on biofuels. Some may argue that this was premature given the fact that the biofuel industry in Georgia was in its infancy. But growers were, and still are, being tempted to get into the biomass production business, and I thought it was time that Cooperative Extension get prepared for the inevitable onslaught of questions that will come with this agricultural revolution. Once this train starts moving…I still believe the biofuel era is coming to Georgia. Currently, the risks and uncertainties of anything new are holding things back, but once this train starts moving, it’s going to be a fast one. Perhaps we’re still a breakthrough or two away from the start of this race, but progress is happening daily and entrepreneurs are working hard to be on the ground floor when biofuel production really starts to generate big money.Up to this point, ethanol production in the U.S. has been almost totally from corn. There are some major tradeoffs associated with that kind of biofuel production system. The real revolution won’t start until we can start making biofuels from waste products and nonfood/feed sources. Even so, peer-reviewed research has shown some pretty incredible economic advantages of using corn ethanol for fuel.Ethanol advantageslast_img read more

Limited Gardening

Limited Gardening

first_imgAre your gardening habits constrained because of physical limitations or a lack of time or space? The up-coming Gardening with Limitations class in Putnam County will help you overcome these obstacles.The Oconee Master Gardeners Association and Putnam County Cooperative Extension are sponsor the class which is the first in a four-part Gardening with Limitations series. The first workshop — focused on garden helpers — is set for Jan. 8, 2014, from 10:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at The Hut in Eatonton.Subsequent workshops will be held on Feb. 12, March 12 and April 19. Each class will focus on a set of tips, tricks and strategies that will make gardening easier.The first class will introduce the latest tools and methods available for limited gardener. All of the products demonstrated will be given away as door prizes. The Hut is located at 400 A West Marion Street in Eatonton. Pre-registration would be appreciated to ensure adequate attendee packets. Call the University of Georgia Extension Office in Putnam County at (706) 485-4151. For more information, email Shawn Davis at mosshappyness@gmail.com.last_img read more

Farmer Trainings

Farmer Trainings

first_imgUniversity of Georgia Cooperative Extension county agents will now come to farms to teach a series of pesticide-focused trainings to agricultural producers through a new, unprecedented training initiative.In an effort expected to span the next three years, UGA Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources county agents will meet with growers at their farms to discuss topics critical to long-term sustainability. This unique, one-on-one training approach allows agents to bring tailor-made, research-based information from UGA right to growers’ front doors.“We are delivering critical information in a very rapid manner to our growers to help them make better decisions,” said Laura Perry Johnson, associate dean for Extension.The trainings focus on pesticide application (http://t.uga.edu/28h), herbicide-resistant weed prevention and management, pollinator protection and sound management program implementation for long-term sustainability. The farmer will determine the focus of much of the discussion, and the UGA Extension agent will assist in overcoming challenges. “Many of our growers attend classroom-type meetings each winter to learn the latest agricultural information; however, those discussions often focus on a more regional or state perspective,” said UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper. “Our one-on-one trainings will focus on each grower’s farm. This allows for prescribed recommendations at their best. Also, keep in mind that our agents live and work in these areas every day, so who is better suited to do the training?” Culpepper stresses that one of the greatest values of these trainings will be the ability to communicate directly with the person applying the pesticides. In some situations, the farmer may not apply the pesticides, but may have hired an on-farm pesticide applicator. Sharing the latest research directly with applicators will improve on-target applications, which will protect the farm, its neighbors, the consumer and the environment. UGA Extension works closely with the Georgia Department of Agriculture to help growers make wise decisions when applying pesticides. One of the greatest challenges is actually getting face time with non-farm owner applicators.This history-making educational program would not have been possible without complete support from UGA Extension agents across Georgia and from Johnson, Culpepper said. “Dr. Johnson’s love for Extension is simply amazing, and her commitment to new and creative approaches for effective information delivery is clear,” Culpepper said. “The survival of Cooperative Extension across America is greatly challenged. However, creative educational outreach through the sharing of the latest, unbiased research data in support of agriculture will further build the relevance of University of Georgia Extension.”For more information, contact your local UGA Extension office by visiting extension.uga.edu or calling 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

‘Bolivian Sunset’

‘Bolivian Sunset’

first_imgShady ground covers that bloom are sought-after in the gardening world, and ‘Bolivian Sunset’ is one of the most beautiful. The name itself conjures up visions of exotic colors.‘Bolivian Sunset,’ known botanically as “Seemannia sylvatica,” is native to Bolivia and Peru. It also has another common name, “hardy gloxinia.”This plant is cold hardy from zones 8 and higher, though everyone can enjoy it as a container plant to be enjoyed on the porch patio or deck and indoors, provided it has a shady or filtered-light location.In Savannah, Georgia, it always seems to be in bloom, but a journey through my photos shows that I have always photographed it starting in September. Now that it’s mid-October, it appears to be in its full glory.As a spreading ground cover in Savannah, our garden’s hardy gloxinia has spread outward and formed a clump about 8 feet wide and deep. The plants themselves reach 12 to 18 inches tall, and I would like it even if it never bloomed.The leaves are shaped like lances, leathery to the touch with a semigloss sheen. In a world of typically green leaves, the texture of this plant is much welcome in the garden. The flowers are dazzling. The tubular blossoms are a fiery orange-red with a yellow throat. They are produced in abundance on the multistemmed ground cover. The blooming commences in the fall — late August to September in Savannah — and will last until spring if not caught by frost. This is one reason why this is a sought-after houseplant.In the landscape, it may die back in zone 8 depending on the winter, then quickly grow back. It spreads by underground rhizomes, which makes me think that it may have opportunities for growth in protected areas of zone 7.Once you find yours, select a site with fertile, organic-rich soil that drains well. Ours is growing next to an old 1920s home that, though sandy, has had lots of organic amendments over the decades. Remember, however, the light requirements of morning sun and afternoon shade, or highly filtered light.When grown in containers, you’ll notice it quickly fills the pot with leaves, blooms and a very rhizomatous root system that may seem to have devoured your lush potting medium. This means that, as you choose to repot, you can make more plants to give away or use in other locations.In the landscape, it would partner extremely well with hostas and ferns for an absolutely lush and dreamy forest floor. We are growing ours in close proximity to shampoo gingers, or Zingiber zerumbet, and ‘Emperor’ hidden gingers for a tropical look.As you might expect, tubular flowers can bring in hummingbirds if they are still active in your area when the flowers begin blooming. Hanging baskets or containers that are off the ground are more suitable. Here at the Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, small bees and sulphur butterflies seem to be the most frequent visitors.Not many ground covers are as pretty as ‘Bolivian Sunset’ gloxinia. I hope you’ll give it a try in your landscape or in a container to beautify your home.Follow me on Twitter: @CGBGgardenguru. To learn more about the UGA Coastal Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm, visit coastalgeorgiabg.org.last_img read more

Lady Beetle Revisited

Lady Beetle Revisited

first_imgThere are more than 6,000 species of lady beetles in the world, most having different natural histories and roles in their environments. Being able to identify the different species is vital to understanding them, and knowing what they look like is typically a major part of that process.That’s where Brad Hounkpati comes in. Hounkpati, a doctoral candidate in entomology at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), established a replacement reference specimen for an important lady beetle species found in South Africa. His work was published in the March 2019 edition of the taxonomic journal Zootaxa.Hounkpati, a Fulbright scholar at UGA, is the first Borlaug LEAP Fellow from Togo, a West African country, and one of the first LEAP fellows hosted by UGA. His primary focus of study has been on the taxonomy of lady beetles in western Africa. His interest in lady beetles started in 1995 when he was working to battle sugar cane pests on Togo farms.As part of his UGA graduate research, he started investigating Rodolia iceryae, a brownish hemispherical beetle, for its potential use as a biological control agent on West African farms. The beetle, which is native to Africa, was described in scientific literature. Hounkpati thought it could be a good analog to the North American lady beetles that were being used as biological control agents in the states.However, when Hounkpati researched the lady beetle in the official literature and museum collections, he realized that the name-bearing type specimen was missing.“Knowing that the vedalia lady beetle (Rodolia cardinalis) and Rodolia iceryae are already established as specialist predators of giant scale insects, and that the vedalia lady beetle occurs in Africa, I wanted to see if Rodolia iceryae has been collected in the West African region,” Hounkpati said. “After unsuccessful research in the two largest insect museums in West Africa, I was quickly interested in knowing more about Rodolia iceryae.”The genus Rodolia is made up of many species of lady beetles that are known to feed on small mites, aphids and scale insects, making them great potential agents of biological control. Members of the Rodolia genus have been used to control pest insects all around the world as far back as 1888.Through his research, Hounkpati found that Rodolia iceryae was originally described by Victorian-age entomologist Oliver Erichson Janson in 1887. But in the century since it was first described, the original specimens had been lost. While Janson’s description was preserved in published literature, it was vague. The loss of the original physical specimen — called a “holotype” in taxonomy circles — put a hole in the scientific record. No one had the physical specimen or an original image to go with the description. There was no way to clarify ambiguity in Janson’s original text.Hounkpati, along with Juanita A. Forrester, an entomologist at Chattahoochee Technical College, and Joseph V. McHugh, a UGA CAES entomology professor and curator of arthropods at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, helped establish that the type material of Rodolia iceryae, originally examined and described by Janson, was lost.Together they helped to find museum specimens that represented the same species described by Janson. They wrote a new, more detailed description of Rodolia iceryae that clarifies the ambiguity about the species’ identity. One of the specimens was chosen to serve as the neotype — the official replacement for the missing original holotype — and the physical reference for that species name. “With this neotype established, the appearance of the species would be clarified,” Hounkpati said. “This would be very helpful in future surveys to recognize Rodolia iceryae in West Africa. If found, that could be the beginning of more research on its efficiency in controlling giant scale insects in West Africa.”The team found that Rodolia iceryae can be recognized by its distinctive genitalia, hemispherical body, a blood-red semicircle on the base of its forewings and its head shape. Specifically, the male genitalia are notable due to an extreme curvature, almost to the point of forming a complete circle.This neotype will hopefully aid the taxonomy of ladybird beetles in the Afrotropical region. This clarification of the concept of Rodolia iceryae in the taxonomic record will help scientists identify the beetle for biological control use in Africa and across the world.McHugh, who works with Hounkpati on his graduate research, says projects like this help build a strong foundation to support other types of research on insects in the region.“Taxonomy is constantly growing and being refined,” McHugh said. “Having a physical reference specimen makes the meaning of a species name clear. It also makes people feel more connected to a species. It’s one thing to have a description and a name; it’s another to be able to look at an actual specimen and know that ‘This is the thing that is actually out there walking around.’”To read the full paper, visit dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4563.2.12. For more information about the UGA Collection of Arthropods, visit site.caes.uga.edu/ugca/.last_img read more

Vermont Venture Network

Vermont Venture Network

first_imgVermont Venture Network serving the entrepreneurial community since 1989May Monthly Breakfast MeetingThursday, May 23, 2002, 8 A.M.Michael H. Gurau, President, CEI Community Ventures, Inc. 36 Water Street, PO Box 268, Wiscasset, ME 04578, Tel: (207) 882-7552, E-Mail: mhg@ceimaine.org(link sends e-mail)CEI is a non-profit community and economic development organization founded in 1977. CEI’s latest initiative is CEI Community Ventures which is a community development venture capital fund formed pursuant to the SBA New Markets Venture Capital Program. CEI Community Ventures is eligible to invest in all of Essex and Orange counties in Vermont plus 24 other census tracts, including Burlington.Randee Fagen, Vice President Sales, Marketing and Customer Services C3Gateways Services, Inc.5005 Jean Talon West, Suite 200 Montreal, PQ H4P 1W7Tel: (514) 908-2400“Multi-Tasking CRM”C3Gateways has developed a proprietary “middleware” solution, ContactIP, to manage the customer interaction with call center personnel. In July 2001, the company acquired 1000% of the shares in Helpoverip.com, which was the initial developer of the customer relationship management technology.A discussion period will follow, and your questions are encouraged.Location: The Radisson Hotel60 Battery StreetBurlington, VT tel. (802) 658-6500Meetings: Meetings are typically held the fourth Thursday of every month, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.To pre-register: Please mail your registration form and check (payable to: VVN) for $15 to: PO Box 5839, Burlington, VT 05402. This fee includes a continental breakfast.Pre-registration will also be accepted by facsimile to (802) 658-0978 or via email to vvnmail@merritt-merritt.com(link sends e-mail). Please help us speed your check-in by pre-registering. Thank you. Please also be sure to include your email address.Name ________________________________________Title ________________________________________Company _____________________________________Address _____________________________________City/State/Zip _________________________________Telephone _________________________________Email Address _________________________________Annual Membership is $25. Members receive notification of all Vermont Venture Network events, distributed via mail and email, for a period of one year.last_img read more