Month: September 2019

Podcast Spieths Dominance The NBAs MVP And Nate Silver Talks To A

Podcast Spieths Dominance The NBAs MVP And Nate Silver Talks To A

Welcome to this week’s episode of Hot Takedown, our podcast where the hot sports takes of the week meet the numbers that prove them right or tear them down. On this week’s show (for April 14, 2015), we discuss Jordan Spieth’s dominant performance at the Masters and what “dominant” even means in golf, as well as who has the statistical edge for NBA MVP. We also air a conversation between FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver and baseball writer Steve Kettmann about the use of stats in baseball journalism. And our significant digit is two — two early declarers for the WNBA draft. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Hot Takedown Links to what we discuss in this week’s show:Jordan Spieth’s performance, in context.What Russell Westbrook’s recent tear is doing to the NBA MVP race.A historical look at how MVP voters have tended to decide.FiveThirtyEight’s response (“Don’t Let Op-Eds Ruin Baseball”) to Steve Kettmann’s op-ed (“Don’t Let Statistics Ruin Baseball”).Significant Digit: Two women’s college basketball players have declared early entry into the WNBA draft. Embed Code If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

Penn State Losses 2 More Incoming Freshmen

Penn State Losses 2 More Incoming Freshmen

Dorian Johnson will not attend Penn State.The NCAA harsh sanctions against Penn State continue to impact the program. Wednesday, Nittany Lions’ No. 2 recruit, Dorian Johnson, withdrew his commitment to attend the college in Happy Valley, while receiver Zach Bradshaw elected to go to Virginia..These two losses hurt the incoming class of a program trying to overcome the stench of the Jerry Sandusky scandal that has left the school, football program and community in shambles.Johnson, from Belle Vernon, Pa., was No. 27 in the ESPN 150 and a Penn State commitment since June. Johnson, the No. 2 offensive tackle nationally and No. 2 overall player in Pennsylvania, said he would not rush to a decision on where he would enroll.In June, the 6-foot-6, 285-pound tackle committed to Penn State over Ohio State, Pittsburgh and West Virginia.Johnson was the second highest-rated commitment in the Lions’ class behind quarterback Christian Hackenberg.Bradshaw, from Damascus, Md., told Penn State coach Bill O’Brien by phone over breakfast Tuesday morning the he planned to  go to Virginia. He rode with his mother to Charlottesville, where  met with the coaching staff and told them he wanted to become the Cavaliers’ 17th commitment.“The decision didn’t have anything to do with schools trying to poach him,” Mike Bradshaw, the player’s son, said. “It didn’t have anything to do with other kids de-committing. It had more to do with, ‘What will the next four years or five years feel like at Penn State because of the sanctions?’“The deciding factor was the magnitude of the sanctions,” With the loss of scholarships, PSU will be competing in the Big Ten against some of the best teams in the country with 65 scholarship players. The class Zach would be a part of would really bear the brunt of the sanctions.”Bradshaw and Johnson became the fourth and fifth Penn State recruits to de-commit since the release of the Freeh report.The snowballing list of de-commitments includes defensive tackle Greg Webb (Erial, N.J./Timber Creek), cornerback Ross Douglas (Avon, Ohio/Avon) and receiver Will Fuller (Philadelphia/Roman Catholic), who verbally committed to Notre Dame on Sunday. Webb recently committed to North Carolina, and Douglas switched his pledge to Michigan.Bradshaw’s father said his son was also seriously debating whether to accept offers from Northwestern and South Carolina — but ultimately decided to choose where he felt most comfortable. The 6-foot-2, 205-pound receiver already knows two players on Virginia through Damascus High School, so building relationships there was never an issue.“What tipped it toward UVA was really a couple things,” his father said. “First, it’s a great academic school. Second, it’s closer to home and third — and most importantly — he felt a great amount of comfort and rapport with the coaches.” read more

Settlement Talks Begin With Jerry Sandusky Victims

Settlement Talks Begin With Jerry Sandusky Victims

Jerry Sandusky victims could soon be getting paid for the anguish the convicted child molester inflicted on them. Mediators appointed by Penn State have begun settlement discussions with at least 20 men who accused Sandusky of sexual abuse, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.The accusers involved in the talks include eight who were named in the state prosecutors’ case against Sandusky, four who filed lawsuits or alleged molestation via the media, and at least eight others who have not made their allegations public.“All of these claims will be very different from one another factually and potentially legally,” negotiator Michael K. Rozen told the Inquirer. “We’re having lots of discussions so far about how to go about evaluating them.”Rozen and law partner Kenneth R. Feinberg handled the compensation for the Sept. 11 victims fund and victims of the 2010 BP Gulf oil spill, and Penn State hired them to handle negotiations for settlements with Sandusky’s alleged victims.“Right now, we’re trying to think through how we transparently – both to the claimants and the university – put the claims into some sort of hierarchy,” Rozen said. “Because there’s so much attention being paid to this, we don’t think we can have 20 separate negotiations and 20 separate resolutions.”No one has publicly provided an estimate of how much the university may be willing to pay in settlements to Sandusky’s victims.At 68, the sentence by judge John Cleland means Sandusky will likely die in prison, which is what many of the jurors said he deserved for manipulating youths he preyed on in his charity organization, Second Mile.Legendary coach Joe Paterno was fired in the aftermath of Sandusky’s arrest and later died from complications of cancer.Penn State president Rodney Erickson issued a statement that read, in part: “While today’s sentence cannot erase what has happened, hopefully it can provide comfort to those effected by those horrible events.”Sandusky maintains his innocence and plans to appeal, a process his lawyer, Joe Amedola, has said will probably begin in the coming weeks. read more

Serena Williams Regrets Comments About Rape Case

Serena Williams Regrets Comments About Rape Case

Serena Williams says she’s reaching out to the family of the victim in the Steubenville rape case after the tennis star was quoted in a Rolling Stone article as saying ”she shouldn’t have put herself in that position.””I am currently reaching out to the girl’s family to let her know that I am deeply sorry for what was written in the Rolling Stone article,” Williams said in a statement released through her agent Wednesday. ”What was written – what I supposedly said – is insensitive and hurtful, and I, by no means, would say or insinuate that she was at all to blame.”The comment was made in one paragraph of a lengthy story posted online Tuesday about Williams, a 16-time Grand Slam title winner who is ranked No. 1 heading into Wimbledon, which starts next week.Two players from the Steubenville, Ohio, high school football team were convicted in March of raping a drunken 16-year-old girl; one of the boys was ordered to serve an additional year for photographing the girl naked. The case gained widespread attention in part because of the callousness with which other students used social media to gossip about it.”What happened in Steubenville was a real shock for me. I was deeply saddened,” Williams said in the statement. ”For someone to be raped, and at only sixteen, is such a horrible tragedy! For both families involved – that of the rape victim and of the accused.”According to the Rolling Stone story, Williams says the perpetrators of the crime ”did something stupid,” and she asks: ”Do you think it was fair, what they got?”She adds, ”I’m not blaming the girl, but if you’re a 16-year-old and you’re drunk like that, your parents should teach you: Don’t take drinks from other people.”Williams also is quoted as saying: ”… she shouldn’t have put herself in that position, unless they slipped her something, then that’s different.”Williams is in England preparing for Wimbledon.”I have fought all of my career for women’s equality, women’s equal rights, respect in their fields – anything I could do to support women, I have done,” she said in the statement. ”My prayers and support always goes out to the rape victim. In this case, most especially, to an innocent 16-year-old child.”Women’s Tennis Association CEO Stacey Allaster said the tour had been touch with Williams about the article.”If she was accurately quoted, then Serena’s comments were both insensitive and wrong,” Allaster said in a statement. ”We disagree with the statements and have made that clear to her.” read more

The Faceless Men And Women Of The US Open

The Faceless Men And Women Of The US Open

(And the slights aren’t limited to photos: At least one American’s photo was accompanied by an Italian flag for one of her doubles matches.)By the first Friday of the Open, the tournament had added photos for many players, including del Potro, Thiem and Almagro. It took a little longer for many women, including Konjuh and Sevastova, who finally got their photos added by that Sunday.Not all the players minded their missing photos. Sevastova, after upsetting Johanna Konta to reach the quarterfinals, said in response to my question at her postmatch news conference that she’d noticed her photo was finally added. “Now I have a photo,” she said. “Now I saw my photo.” Having no photo was better than if the U.S. Open had just used her “WTA picture with short hair,” she said. “I didn’t like it, actually, so it was OK without [a] picture.”The U.S. Open provides an unusual opportunity to check out what the faceless men and women of sport have in common because the tournament lists hundreds of players, all gathered on one website. On the first Friday of the tournament, I did an exhaustive survey of all 579 players on the page — the number shifts during the tournament as draws are finalized for events that start later in the tournament, such as juniors. More than one third of the players — 211 — were missing photos. That includes 44 players who were in the men’s or women’s singles draws, the most prominent events at the Open. In addition to Konjuh and Sevastova, that list included Naomi Osaka, who’d just lost a third-round thriller in Arthur Ashe Stadium to Madison Keys; Laura Siegemund, who was playing seven-time major champ Venus Williams in Ashe the next day; 2015 French Open quarterfinalist Alison Van Uytvanck; Laura Robson, who made the fourth round at the 2012 U.S. Open; and Americans Christian Harrison and Danielle Collins.It’s no coincidence that more women than men were missing: According to Widmaier, there was a lag in adding women’s photos even after the problem was identified. (He wasn’t sure why.)So what factors decided who got a photo by the fifth day of the tournament and who didn’t? I checked a wide range of factors,1By grabbing data off each player’s U.S. Open page and running a regression between whether the player had a photo on the night of the tournament’s first Friday and the player’s other characteristics. and the determinants of whether a player had a profile pic weren’t surprising: Americans, players active on tour and veterans were mostly likely to have a photo. Being from the U.S. increased a player’s chances of having a picture on the site by 30 percentage points. With every singles match a competitor played this year, his or her chances went up by 2 percentage points. A year of age added 3 percentage points.2The percentages assume a linear relationship, which wouldn’t apply at extremes. (We don’t think someone who has played 60 singles matches this year has a greater than 100 percent chance of having a photo.) The exact percentages depend on which variables we include. I also tested, for instance, peak singles ranking, career matches and matches won, but those all are closely linked to both singles matches played this year and to age. So perhaps the most surprisingly snubbed people were the American women’s doubles pair of Ashley Weinhold, 27, and Caitlin Whoriskey, 28. Their faces remained missing on the second Thursday of the tournament. (Then again, neither has ever been ranked in the top 100 in singles or doubles.)Konjuh, who is 18, said she understood why she didn’t have a photo. “Like probably most of the other players that are young or coming didn’t have pictures,” she said in her news conference.Widmaier promised a more completist approach to player photography at the 2017 Open: “It will be improved upon next year.” Anastasija Sevastova and Ana Konjuh defied expectations and their low rankings — both outside the top 40 — to reach the U.S. Open quarterfinals. They have something else in common: For the first week of the tournament, where their photos were supposed to appear on the U.S. Open website and app, there instead appeared black rectangles with the flags of their countries and the words “NO BIO PHOTO.”“I saw on the live score, yeah, on the U.S. Open app, yeah, it says, like, ‘bio’ or something,” Konjuh said when I asked about her absent photo at her news conference after she upset Agnieszka Radwanska in the fourth round.Every sport has these faceless men and women, the ones who aren’t supposed to make the team or get off the bench, who are so new they haven’t been photographed, who may get rushed in front of a digital camera so media staff can get a snap worth posting.Tennis majors face a special challenge in filling those blank rectangles: Up to 128 players enter each of the men’s and women’s qualifying draws, and more than 100 others enter each of the men’s and women’s singles draws. There can be more than 100 players competing only in doubles, and an additional 100 or more might enter only the juniors or juniors qualifying draws. As of the two-week event’s middle Sunday, there were 698 players on the U.S. Open player page.But some of the snubbed U.S. Open players are hardly nobodies. Early in the tournament, 2009 U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro, No. 10 Dominic Thiem and former No. 9 Nicolas Almagro were among those missing photos. Asked about them on the first Thursday of the tournament, Chris Widmaier, spokesman for the U.S. Tennis Association, which runs the U.S. Open, said, “It’s a disappointment.” I asked if it’s a priority to get photos for the players — all of whom have been professionally photographed at dozens if not hundreds of matches worldwide, and who have pictures that appear on the ATP and WTA websites and on their U.S. Open credentials. “It is now,” Widmaier said. read more

Michigans Lineup Was Gutted How Much Will It Matter

Michigans Lineup Was Gutted How Much Will It Matter

Jim Harbaugh has restored Michigan’s place in the upper ranks of the college-football hierarchy with two straight 10-win seasons. As the team kicks off its 2017 campaign on Saturday against the 17th-ranked Florida Gators in Arlington, Texas, the Wolverines will bring a new sense of optimism and Harbaugh-infused intensity. There’s one thing they won’t bring, though: Many of last year’s players.Michigan, which is ranked 11th to start the season, is perhaps the hardest team in college football to get a read on — and not just because Harbaugh refused to release his team’s official roster until Wednesday. The team was one of the best in the nation last season but sustained heavy personnel losses in the offseason, saying goodbye to seven starters on offense and a staggering 10 on defense. According to college football information guru Phil Steele’s team experience rankings, Michigan ranks 127th out of 130 teams this year. As you might expect, teams who lose numerous starters tend to take a step back the following season — no matter how good the incoming recruits are.With only five starters coming back, Michigan is returning less of its lineup than any other team in the country. And indeed, among Power Five schools since 2001, only Arkansas in 20041Which returned only four starters. brought back a less experienced lineup than the Wolverines, according to data we obtained from Steele. It’s no coincidence that those Razorbacks finished with a losing record after winning nine games the year before, because there’s a pretty clear relationship between how much talent returns to a team and how well it does that season. Using Steele’s data,2Including seasons going back to 2008, when information on returning quarterbacks is complete. I ran a regression and found that every additional starter lost on offense shaves about one-fifth of a win off of a team’s record3Per 12 games, against a neutral schedule. — and that’s if none of those starters played quarterback. Losing a starting QB costs a team about three-fifths of a win per season.Here’s how the number of starters lost would be expected to affect an average FBS team (according to ESPN’s team efficiency ratings, which grade a team on each side of the ball on a 0 to 100 scale, with 50 as average): Michigan’s defense carried an 87.4 rating last season, third-best in the FBS, but my model predicts that they’ll drop to 62.8 — basically the same as last year’s Texas A&M and Penn State outfits — after turning over nearly the entire starting corps. (Only linebacker Mike McCray is back from last year’s starting lineup on D.) Even accounting for the fact that the typical defense loses about 4.5 starters per season, the Wolverines figure to be down 0.9 more wins than average because of their many defensive departures.Add it up, and Michigan’s inexperience has unquestionably caused it to lose ground relative to the rest of the country.But fear not, Ann Arbor. This doesn’t mean that Michigan will immediately plummet back to the depths it reached under Rich Rodriguez and Brady Hoke after briefly coming up for air with Harbaugh. The Wolverines have some important factors working in their favor, according to the model.Although losing a bunch of players hurts, the single most damaging starter a team can wave goodbye to is its starting quarterback — and Michigan’s incumbent QB, Wilton Speight, is still around this season. (He may not start, but even that might be a positive sign if Harbaugh has another QB on hand that he believes is as good as a returning starter.) Returning a QB can boost a team’s offensive efficiency rating by about 8 points, which is enough to offset the loss of about 3.5 non-QB starters by itself.Another important factor is playing in a Power Five conference. Because a top conference such as the Big Ten perennially dominates the recruiting rolls, its schools always have a deep talent base, which in turn makes them much better equipped than smaller programs to weather a mass exodus of players. When I combined efficiency ratings on both sides of the ball, I found that a Power Five team can expect to win about one more game (against a neutral schedule) than a school not in a Power Five conference, even after controlling for starters lost. Considering how good Michigan’s recruiting has been under Harbaugh, the Wolverines’ next crop of starters should help them survive the loss of the previous one.And, finally, there’s Harbaugh himself. According to my model, teams that bring back a head coach tend to gain nearly a half-win on teams that break in a new one, after controlling for all of the other factors mentioned. Continuity is huge in a sport like college football, in which the status quo reigns supreme — as long as nothing upsets the apple cart too much. Having a consistent system can help player development, for instance, as recruits have the benefit of learning the playbook over the course of multiple seasons. And Harbaugh has to rank among the better coaches in the sport today, having turned around Stanford and Michigan from a combined 6-18 record in the seasons before he arrived to a combined 22-4 in his most recent campaigns with each school. (Not to mention bringing the San Francisco 49ers one first-and-goal touchdown away from a Vince Lombardi trophy.)Harbaugh is a bit of an, um, eccentric coach, and — including his stint in the NFL — he has a tendency to burn his teams out after several seasons of rapid improvement. But for now, he still has Michigan in the ascending phase. In other words, the odds are still high that the Wolverines take a step backward this season, but the drop might not be as steep as it could have been. For a team like Michigan, which notched a (well-above-average) offensive rating of 73.7 last season, the loss of seven offensive starters projects to drop their offensive rating to 63.0 — only about as good as Mississippi State or Colorado State was last season and 7.2 points lower than it would have been if Michigan had the FBS’s average number of non-quarterback starters coming back.4In 2017, that average number is 6.1.That alone would figure to cost the Wolverines a half-win this season relative to average, but the losses on defense could be even more damaging. In Steele’s data set, only one other Power Five team — the 2010 Minnesota Gophers — lost 10 of 11 defensive starters between seasons, and that team’s defensive rating dropped from 58.9 to 22.2. Not every team with defensive losses sees quite so steep a drop-off, but here’s how the number of departing starters tends to affect a defense: read more

2014 Big Ten Media Days Urban Meyer has worries about College Football

2014 Big Ten Media Days Urban Meyer has worries about College Football

OSU football coach Urban Meyer answers questions from the media at the 2014 Big Ten Media Days July 29 in Chicago.Credit: Tim Moody / Lantern sports editorCHICAGO –– Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer expressed his concerns with the new College Football Playoff system during day two of the Big Ten Media Days in Chicago.Meyer said Tuesday that while he believes the new system will be “great,” he worries about “fan fatigue, student-athlete fatigue and student-athlete family fatigue.”“We were talking about that at dinner last night,” Meyer said. “If I am (OSU senior defensive lineman) Michael Bennett’s family, and we go on a nice run, you can plan on spending $20,000 going to the Big Ten Championship Game, going to the semi-final game and going to the championship game.”Meyer said he was worried about his players’ families’ ability to watch their sons play and said he believes something needs to be done.“I think the NCAA — that needs to be addressed,” Meyer said. “How is that family going to not go watch their kid play? If I was on that committee I would have addressed that first.”Meyer went as far to say that be believes the players should be involved.“I think the student-athlete should have a say-so in that,” Meyer said. “It is not just a commissioner’s role. I got a feeling their families will go for free to the national championship game but my starting centers can’t? That’s not right.”Bennett said he thinks the playoff will be fun, but had not yet thought about the cost of travel for families.“That is three big vacation trips in about a month,” Bennett said. “That would be something that families have got to save up for and a lot of families won’t be able to afford.”College Football Playoff Chief Operating Officer Michael Kelly said he was excited about the playoff process, and said that the semi-final and national championship festivities will be similar to those in years past.“We’re going to take the former template of the BCS National Championship game week and transfer that into the College Football Playoff semifinal week,” Kelly said. “And by that they’ll be in town for six nights, but the first half of the event and activities in the community will be front loaded. They’ll have a great time. They’ll enjoy that.”Meyer said he is not so sure.“The kids get to go but the parents have to pay,” Meyer said. “They (parents) drive in the day of the game and they watch the game, and they go home.”Meyer said he believes that a “very small percentage” of his players’ families would be able to afford to travel to the bowl games and “do it the right way.”Bennett said he believes some money could be given to players’ families so that they could attend their sons’ games.“I think that would be nice, and not too much to ask for,” Bennett said of possible funding for the families. “It is not like they need anything extravagant, but to be able to see their children play in big time games instead of having to pick and choose. You don’t want to watch the Big Ten Championship and not have money to watch the national championship.”Meyer said he is not sure if the issue has been addressed yet, but believes it needs to be.“Doesn’t it have to?” Meyer said. “It might have been already discussed. I am hoping it has been. I have not sat in those meetings.”Meyer’s Buckeyes are scheduled to begin the 2014 season at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Md., against Navy Aug. 30. Kickoff is set for noon. read more

Football Timing of Urban Meyers retirement saves Ohio State millions

Football Timing of Urban Meyers retirement saves Ohio State millions

Urban Meyer watches the Buckeye offense in the third quarter of the game against Penn State on Sept. 29. Ohio State won 27-26. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorUrban Meyer will leave more than just his legacy at Ohio State.When the Buckeyes head coach retires Jan. 2, he will leave millions of dollars on the table, abandoning nearly $28 million in guaranteed pay had he remained as head coach until his contract expired in 2023.Meyer was set to receive an annual base salary of $840,000, with guarantees of $4,544,000 per year, according to an addendum in his contract signed in March 2018. He was also to receive separate payments of $160,000 for each January 31 he was employed between 2019 and 2022. He also forgoes bonuses that could add another $12 million if his team was successful on the field and in the classroom. According to the third addendum in Meyer’s contract, the Ohio State head coach could receive bonuses of $50,000 for winning the Big Ten East, $100,000 for winning the Big Ten, $200,000 for appearing in a College Football Playoff bowl game and $250,000 for appearing in a College Football Playoff semi-final game. However, if his team were to advance to the College Football Playoff finals, he would not receive the $250,000 but would instead be receive $350,000.The contract also offers bonuses of $50,000 for winning Big Ten Coach of the Year and $75,000 for National Coach of the Year. Despite winning three Big Ten titles and a national championship, Meyer never received either of the two coach of the year awards.If Ohio State had chosen to buy Meyer out of his contract after this season, Meyer would have received a buy-out of $38,058,402. Meyer would only receive that money if his contract was terminated by the university for a reason beyond one deemed as “for cause.”In an extension signed in March of 2018, Ohio State and the head coach agreed on this buy-out amount unless Meyer’s contract had been terminated “for cause.” The contract would be void if the head coach violated Ohio State’s Sexual Misconduct Policy and Title IX, which includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate violence and stalking. Meyer was suspended for the first three games of the 2018 season after he had “failed to adhere to the precise requirements” of his contract, in terms of responding to the domestic violence allegations made against former Ohio State wide receivers coach Zach Smith, according to the summary of investigative findings released on Aug. 22. Meyer was docked two separate payments of $285,253.84 as a result of his suspension. read more

Oxbridge applicants try to outLeft each other

Oxbridge applicants try to outLeft each other

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. There has been surge of middle-class youngsters who were very politically engagedCredit:Press Association She said: “Picking a definitive issue can show passion. And it’s fine to have strong political opinions.”But students have to show they can argue their case. Radical slogans are no substitute for reasoned arguments.” jeremy corbyn “It is very common for anyone with different views to be shouted down. So I understand the temptation to conform and to conform loudly.”I’m very interested in politics but I also made the mistake in my draft personal statement of being long on outrage and short on argument.”center_img ‘Creeping inflexibility’But interviewers report a creeping inflexibility among applicants keen to show off their political credentials.Ms Williams, whose firm provides guidance and support for students applying to Oxford and Cambridge, said: “I recently asked a candidate who wanted to study politics what books he had read by Conservative thinkers, only to get the response, ‘I don’t read anything by Tories.'”That is shockingly shortsighted. You won’t impress an Oxbridge interviewer by closing down dialogue with an unsubstantiated viewpoint.”The Cecil Rhodes effectMs Williams said the recent controversies over the Rhodes statue and the Benin bronzes at Cambridge had increased awareness of political activism at both universities.Her views were backed up by one sixth-former and Cambridge hopeful, who said: “There is enormous pressure among my peer group to be Left-wing and unquestioningly Left-wing. Her warnings follow a series of protests at universities. Earlier this year Oxford students campaigned for the removal of the statue of British imperialist Cecil Rhodes because of his controversial views over race.Others have protested over tuition fees or transgender rights. Sixth formers applying to university may be limiting their chances by vying to show off radical credentials, in a move described by admissions tutors as “out-Lefting” each other.Candidates are increasingly writing or expressing statements such as “Boris is a monster”, “All Tories are vile” and “Jeremy Corbyn speaks for me” to appear as radical as possible.But Rebecca Williams, head of the admissions consultancy Oxbridge Applications, said while there was nothing wrong in having strong views, candidates had to be able to back them up.last_img read more

Passenger plane approaching Heathrow in nearmiss with drone 650ft to the east

Passenger plane approaching Heathrow in nearmiss with drone 650ft to the east

first_imgA passenger plane flying near the Shard had a “very near-miss” with a drone as it approached Heathrow Airport, an official report has revealed.The drone, described as black and about 50cm (20in) wide, was spotted out of the right flight deck window at about 12.45pm on July 18, the UK Airprox Board (UKAB) report into the incident said. It added that the account given of the incident “portrayed a situation where a collision had only been narrowly avoided and chance had played a major part”.It deemed the incident to be in the most serious category of risk and said the drone operator had not been traced. The ShardCredit:PA The Shardcenter_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The A320 aircraft, which was flying at an altitude of 4,900ft near to the Shard skyscraper in central London, “narrowly avoided” colliding with the drone, according to the report.The crew said the drone had “probably” passed above the right wing and the horizontal stabiliser, which is found on the tail of the plane.The UKAB report said: “Members agreed that this incident appeared to be a very near-miss and that the drone operator should not have been flying in that location at that altitude.”last_img read more

Teenagers jailed for killing superhero father by throwing lit flare into car

Teenagers jailed for killing superhero father by throwing lit flare into car

first_imgKeani Hobbs, 18, who along with a 16-year-old boy who cannot be named for legal reasons, has been jailed The type of flare which was thrown into a car with Vilson Meshi Credit: PA Two teenagers who killed a “superhero daddy” by throwing a lit flare into his car as he slept inside it have been jailed, as the family of one defendant hurled abuse at the sentencing judge.Father-of-three Vilson Meshi was asleep in the back of his Audi outside his former partner’s house, where he was to visit two of his children the next morning.The 31-year-old car wash boss died of inhaling fire fumes on February 27, 2016. Judge Lynch said the defendants were “both equally culpable in this case”.She said the 16-year-old took Hobbs to the car “knowing what was going to be done”, and that Hobbs’s part was “igniting the flare and throwing it into the car”. Keani Hobbs, 18, and a 16-year-old boy who cannot be named for legal reasons, were both found guilty of manslaughter and theft of marine distress flares from a docked boat at an earlier trial, and were sentenced at Chelmsford Crown Court on Friday.Judge Patricia Lynch said the teenagers’ actions had been “for fun”, and she jailed Hobbs for nine years and the younger co-defendant for six years.As the 16-year-old’s lesser sentence was read out, there was a shout of “f—— soft spot corrupt bitch as far as I’m concerned” and “disgusting” from the family of Hobbs, who were sitting in the public gallery, directed at the judge. “The teenagers have never given a rationale as to why they did what they did. It was an act of stupidity to try and scare him.”The defendants acted recklessly and were it not for their thoughtless actions, Vilson would not have needlessly died.”I want to thank his family for working with us during this very difficult time and pay tribute to them for their dignity and restraint.”While nothing will bring Vilson back, I hope these convictions and sentences are of some comfort to them and they can move forward to start rebuilding their lives.” Some people then stormed out of the public gallery.Mr Meshi, who rented a flat in Glossop, Derbyshire, had parked his car in Basildon, Essex, where he had arranged to visit his children the next day, when the flare was thrown into his vehicle. The inside of the Audi car belonging to Vilson Meshi, who died after a stolen marine distress flare was thrown into his car "for fun" “Nothing or no-one can replace their superhero daddy in their eyes,” she said.Hobbs, who wore a parka jacket with a large fluffy hood, sobbed as she was led to the cells and shouted “I love you” to family in the public gallery.Hobbs, of Stagden Cross, Pitsea, Essex, was jailed for nine years for manslaughter and 12 months concurrently for theft.The 16-year-old, of Camberwell, London, was jailed for six years for manslaughter, with 12 months to run concurrently for theft. “Neither of you realised the man was going to die, but you must have realised it would have caused harm,” she said.”Your actions were reckless, they were stupid and they were dangerous.”She continued: “The whole reckless enterprise was on the basis that it would be fun to throw a lighted flare into a vehicle where a man was asleep in the back.”Mr Meshi’s former partner, Michelle Mehtab, said in a victim personal statement that he was a “doting father” and regularly travelled to see their two children. The case of a flare which was thrown into a car with Vilson MeshiCredit: PA Keani Hobbs, 18, who along with a 16-year-old boy who cannot be named for legal reasons, has been jailedCredit: PA The case of a flare which was thrown into a car with Vilson Meshi The type of flare which was thrown into a car with Vilson Meshi  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Charlie Sherrard, mitigating for the 16-year-old, said the youth could not read or write properly, and had been brought up in an environment where it was deemed acceptable to “go round thieving”.Tony Badenoch, mitigating for Hobbs, said she had no previous convictions.Vilson Meshi’s former partner Michelle Mehtab said in a victim impact statement: “My children get upset when daddy misses important events such as birthdays and Christmasses.”Nothing can replace their superhero daddy in their eyes.”My children are confused and talk about their heartbreaking thoughts they say I wish we can put a ladder to the sky and see daddy. We wish the sky had mobile phones.”In a statement, his heartbroken parents Islam and Drista Meshi said: “What happened has changed our lives forever.”Whilst nothing can bring Vilson back, we feel that justice has been done.”We would like to thank Essex Police and the CPS who have helped us find closure and justice.”Detective Chief Inspector Stephen Jennings, from the Kent and Essex Serious Crime Directorate, said: “The investigation has been extensive.”For several months, we tried to piece together the evidence to the boy who was captured on CCTV on a bike moments before the incident. We put in a lot of hard work to identify him. The inside of the Audi car belonging to Vilson Meshi, who died after a stolen marine distress flare was thrown into his car “for fun”Credit: PAlast_img read more

New director of Kings College choir spoke out against hooty polite tradition

New director of Kings College choir spoke out against hooty polite tradition

It is arguably one of the most famous and acclaimed of English choirs, lauded for the purity of the young chorister’s voices and the soaring majesty of its performances.So it comes as something of a surprise that the choir of King’s College Chapel, Cambridge has decided to appoint as its new musical director a man who has previously criticised the “nicely packaged” sound of “the very polite English cathedral choir” and even dismissed some as “hooty”.What’s more, Daniel Hyde has admitted he preferred the choir of King’s great rival, St John’s College to that of his own alma mater.The appointment of Mr Hyde suggests King’s College is ready to risk changing a sound that has captivated millions around the world with its annual Christmas Eve broadcast of the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols.In an interview given before his appointment Mr Hyde, currently musical director of St Thomas Church in Manhattan, told the New York Times there were aspects of the English choral style he was hoping to challenge, including what he described as “the traditional very polite English cathedral choir sound, where one is never louder than lovely, and it’s all very nicely packaged, and the i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed”.He added that what he wanted to hear in a choir was a greater variety of tone in the boy’s treble voices.“When boys are 11, 12, 13 years old, they have this amazing instrument,” he said. “When they learn to use it in a free and open, relaxed way, there is a lot of power and color. That is the sound I’m interested in: It’s very resonant, it’s very exciting. It isn’t small and, dare I say it, slightly hooty.” Daniel Hyde directing the choir of Magdalen College, Oxford Mr Hyde also confessed that when he was an undergraduate at Cambridge he thought the choir of King’s College was labouring under its huge reputation, leading to its performances being stifled, in marked contrast to the choir of nearby St John’s College.“It wasn’t just the buildings,” he told the paper. “I think there was a freedom of expression at St. John’s because there wasn’t the pressure of expectation. So I tried to soak both those things up, and wherever I’ve gone since I’ve tried to mix that detail and accuracy of King’s with that more open-throated, expressive, musically phrased singing of John’s.”Mr Hyde, who graduated with a First in Music from King’s College, subsequently directed choirs at Jesus College, Cambridge, and Magdalen College, Oxford, before moving to New York.His appointment has been welcomed across the world of English choristry, with the current director of music at King’s College, Stephen Cleobury, writing to Mr Hyde on Twitter: “I’m delighted that I shall be handing over to you. I’m sure you’ll take the choir of King’s College Cambridge from strength to strength.”Prof Michael Proctor, Provost of King’s College, Cambridge, said: “I am very pleased that we have managed to secure the services of such a distinguished musician as Daniel. We look forward to his bringing his skills and extensive experience to bear in developing further the already outstanding musical offering of the College.”Some, however, have questioned whether King’s is ready for Mr Hyde. One fan of English choral music said: “Very odd choice. Good pedigree as instrumentalist, but as a trainer of choirs?”The position of director of music at King’s College dates back to 1606, and such is the tradition of continuity that there have only been 15 previous incumbents since then, with Mr Cleobury having held the post for 36 years.Mr Hyde, who will take up his new position in October next year, said the choir’s current sound had been developed and established as a result of  the best-selling albums of the choristers’ performances, and that early recordings suggested it had once been “freer” than today.But he told the Telegraph his plan was not to rip up the King’s College choir rule book and start again.”The building will tell me when I get there how the choir is meant to sound,” he said, adding that he will act as a “steward and guardian” of the reputation of the choir, while hoping to bring its sound to a new audience.He said: “In nurturing and developing the minds and talents of many future generations of choristers and students at King’s, I hope I will succeed in sustaining the music of the daily services and bringing the College’s music-making to an ever-increasing audience.  It’s a daunting task, and it is one that I shall relish.” Daniel Hyde directing the choir of Magdalen College, OxfordCredit:Hugh Warwick Thank you, Dan. I’m delighted that I shall be handing over to you in the summer of 2019. I’m sure you’ll take @ChoirOfKingsCam from strength to strength.— Stephen Cleobury (@SJCleobury) May 23, 2018 Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Fishing may be cruel even if you throw your catch back in

Fishing may be cruel even if you throw your catch back in

Fishing may be cruel even if the fish are thrown back in the water, because they subsequently struggle to feed, according to a new study.“Catch-and-release” policies have become the norm on many British rivers and lakes in recent years, considered a more human method and vital for conserving stocks.But scientists now believe that hooking fish such as salmon and trout injures their mouths so that they become less able to suck in prey.In the first study of its kind, researchers monitored 20 shiner perch caught from the wild in Canada.Half had been hooked and half caught in a net.When they were observed using high-speed cameras in a controlled environment, those that had been hooked fed significantly less well.The scientists at University of California Riverside believe this is because the hole caused by the hook disrupts the suction system, which works similar to how humans suck fluids through as straw.”As we predicted, the fish with the mouth injuries exhibited a reduction in the speed at which they were able to draw prey into their mouths,” said Professor Tim Higham, who led the research.”This was the case even though we used barbless hooks, which are less damaging than barbed hooks. “Although we don’t yet know how or if this reduction in feeding performance would affect fitness and survivability in nature, we can say that fishing-induced injuries impact the fish’s ability to feed while the mouth is healing.”This study emphasises that catch-and-release is not as simple as removing the hook and all being well, but rather is a complex process that should be studied in more detail.”However, a spokesman for the Angling Trust said: “The report clearly states that further research is required to assess whether or not there is any impact on fish populations as a result of catch and release angling, and studies would also be required on other species.”Anglers takes great care of the fish they catch and have the biggest stake in thriving populations.”The new research is published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Doctors sent home sepsis sufferer who told them he felt like he

Doctors sent home sepsis sufferer who told them he felt like he

Senior coroner Roger Hatch said doctors should have checked him for sepsis Senior coroner Roger Hatch said doctors should have checked him for sepsisCredit:PA Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust has accepted liability and admitted breaching a duty of care by discharging Mr Mason with such symptoms.Mr Mason died after his organs began to fail and he had a cardiac arrest while in an induced coma.His mother, Fiona Mason, said she hoped these issues would be “acted on with all seriousness” as she remembered her son as a popular man who was looking forward to his career and going travelling.She said: “Our house used to be full of laughter and life. It is now quiet and we are all struggling.”If changes are made that result in lives being saved, that will be of some small comfort.” “This should have occurred when he attended the hospital six hours earlier on March 16 when he first presented.”However, the initial failures to correctly diagnose and treat Mr Mason did not amount to neglect, the coroner said. A student was failed by doctors who didn’t spot he had sepsis, a coroner ruled at his inquest after medics sent him home despite him telling them he “felt like he was dying”.Tim Mason, 21, had flu-like symptoms but was discharged just after 8am on March 16 without further treatment, an inquest in Maidstone, Kent, heard.But hours later the Sussex Downs College student, who was training to be an electrical engineer, was rushed back into Tunbridge Wells Hospital’s accident and emergency department for the second time that day. He was appropriately treated, but died hours later.Senior coroner Roger Hatch, delivering a narrative inquest verdict, said that given the results of his blood test, temperature and heart rate, Mr Mason should have received a sepsis screening and been reviewed by a senior doctor when he was first at hospital.The coroner said: “Had he been correctly diagnosed it is most likely he would have been prescribed intravenous antibiotics and he would not have died. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Drone swarms led by F35 jets will overwhelm Britains enemies Defence Secretary

Drone swarms led by F35 jets will overwhelm Britains enemies Defence Secretary

Britain’s new F-35 jets will be able to deploy “drone swarms” to “confuse and overwhelm” enemy forces by the end of the year, Gavin Williamson has said. Any position emitting radar energy or seen by drone cameras could then be attacked by missiles from the F-35 or other… The Defence Secretary has announced groups of unmanned aircraft will seek to penetrate enemy air defences, all controlled by a pilot in one of the RAF’s new F-35 stealth jets. Air defence radars and surface to air missile sites will be the most likely targets, as the drones seek either to spot the enemy positions using cameras or force adversaries to ‘light up’ their equipment by switching on their radars to attack the drones. read more

Jack Shepherd says animal instinct inspired him to flee as he lands

Jack Shepherd says animal instinct inspired him to flee as he lands

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Jack Shepherd, the so-called speedboat killer, claimed he was “driven by an animal instinct” when he decided to flee justice, as he yesterday boarded a plane to Britain.The 31-year-old spent months hiding in Georgia after disappearing ahead of his trial for the manslaughter of Charlotte Brown, who died while on a date in his speedboat in 2015.A huge international manhunt was launched to find Shepherd after he was sentenced in his absence to six years in prison last summer, ending only when he handed himself in to authorities in Tbilisi in January.The fugitive spent more than two months awaiting extradition in a Georgian jail and finally landed at Gatwick airport last night before police escorted him away ahead of his appearance in the Old Bailey today. Asked by a BBC reporter about his decision to run from authorities, he replied: “It wasn’t premeditated, as some have said, but it was just a case of being driven by an animal instinct, fear, and just jumping on a plane really without much of a plan.”Shepherd is due to appear at the Old Bailey in London this morning.Angela Deal, head of extradition at the CPS said: “Jack Shepherd has returned to the UK to face justice following close co-operation between the CPS Extradition Unit, UK colleagues and the Georgian authorities, to ensure a successful extradition. read more

Oxbridge should consider poor pupils with one B and two Cs at

Oxbridge should consider poor pupils with one B and two Cs at

Research found students admitted to Oxbridge and Russell Group universities with BCC grades at A-Level had an 80% chance of graduating with a degree and a 46% chance of leaving with a first or upper second, it claimed.The report concluded: “As it stands, the implementation of contextual admissions does not go far enough.“Research has shown that lowering advertised grades at high-tariff providers to BCC, for example, would broaden the pool of available applicants without a marked fall in academic standards.”High-tariff providers are generally universities requiring grades of AAB upwards at A-Level, including Oxbridge and Russell Group universities.The OfS said information about students – such as whether they qualify for free school meals – should be considered by all universities when assessing a candidate.League table providers are facing pressure to tweak their criteria so universities which make a greater number of contextual admissions are not penalised.Several top institutions last year expressed concern that any change to their admissions practice would cause “reputational damage” as they plunged down the rankings.But the OfS said there remains “no clearly understood approach” to contextual admissions across the sector, with guidance on grades which varies widely.Sir Michael Barber, chairman of the OfS, said: “A young person from a council estate who gets decent A levels has often had to work a lot harder than the young person from a better off neighbourhood who gets a few grades more.“That’s why it is right that contextual admissions are now an increasing part of the picture.“When I visit great American universities, I’m struck by how they look beyond standardised test scores to see potential civic leaders, potential public servants, potential entrepreneurs who can succeed if given the chance to shine.“When it comes to trying to reach beyond their traditional intakes, these universities have got something to teach us.”The regulator also identified the need for “more diverse routes” into higher education, such as bridging course, foundation years and degree apprenticeships.Foundation years can be offered to students who miss their A-Level requirements or lack qualifications as a precursor to their degree course, while apprenticeships integrate study and work.The OfS hopes to eliminate the gulf between the most and least disadvantaged students at the country’s top universities within the next 20 years. Poor pupils with one B and two Cs at A-Level should be considered for places at Oxbridge to increase diversity in top institutions, the universities regulator has said. The Office for Students (OfS) claimed so-called contextual offers give bright students from deprived areas a route into university, without risking a fall in academic standards.It suggested England’s higher education sector needed to be “more ambitious” with how it handles applications from  candidates with deprived backgrounds, similar to US and Scottish institutions.Under the traditional admissions system, the focus on top A-Level grades risks shutting out students with great potential from disadvantaged backgrounds, the OfS suggested in a report.Candidates from the most affluent neighbourhoods are nearly six times more likely to reach the top universities than their peers on the opposite end of the social scale, data from 2018 showed.This comes despite a “significant growth” in the number of contextual offers over recent years, according to the OfS. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Bitter sweet victory for Richard Ashcroft as Rolling Stones stars hand over

Bitter sweet victory for Richard Ashcroft as Rolling Stones stars hand over

The late Allen Klein, of ABKCO Records which owned the Rolling Stones catalogue up to 1970 including the sample in question, moved to protect his copyright in a legal negotiation which left Ashcroft signing over rights to the song and its lyrics.More than 20 years later, after his management approached Jagger and Richards directly to appeal for the return of the song, the Rolling Stones members agreed.Speaking at The Ivors 2019 after winning an award for his outstanding contribution to British music, Ashcroft said: “We’ve been working over the last few months, years, 20 years.”As of last month Mick Jagger and Keith Richards signed over all their publishing for Bitter Sweet Symphony.“Which is a truly kind and magnanimous thing to do, they didn’t need to do it.”As of last month, thank you so much Keith Richards and Mick Jagger, for acknowledging me as the writer of a f—— masterpiece – it’ll live forever.” Mick Jagger and Keith RichardsCredit: Mark Allan Mick Jagger and Keith Richards It centres on a sample of a four second sample of an Andrew Loog Oldham orchestral recording of The Last Time, used as a loop in the backing track.While permission for the use of the recording was obtained, that did not extend to permission for the use of the song with copies of The Verve’s album Urban Hymns already created and distributed around the world ready to be released before the error was noticed. Richard Ashcroft has regained rights to his song Bitter Sweet Symphony after more than two decades, after Sir Mick Jagger and Keith Richards agreed to hand over their legal entitlement to royalties.The Verve singer lost the rights to his most recognisable song in 1997 thanks to a four-second orchestral sample of Rolling Stones song The Last Time used as a backing track.On Thursday, Ashcroft disclosed that Jagger and Richards had returned them to him as a “truly kind and magnanimous thing to do”, after his management approached them directly to appeal.All future royalties that would have gone to the pair for Bitter Sweet Symphony will now go to Ashcroft, and they have removed their names from the credits for the track.The case had gone down in music folklore as a landmark copyright dispute, held up as a cautionary tale by some and an injustice by others. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

County lines epidemic blamed as number of children missing or linked to

County lines epidemic blamed as number of children missing or linked to

Show more The smuggling networks are known as “county lines”. Academics and MPs described the figures, analysed by The Guardian, as “shocking”.“There will be elements of that about increased reporting and awareness but that is not going to account for such a big rise – there is something happening,” Simon Harding, an associate professor of criminology at the University of West London, told the newspaper. “Working in county lines has a great allure for young people. It gives them a tax-free income, gives them a regular income and high income”.  The Department for Education data showed a steady rise in the number of vulnerable children who go missing or become involved with gangs over the past few years. Factors for a child disappearing are complex but can also include the absence of social services in the area, along with the work of drugs gangs. Josie Allan, of Missing People UK, said: “I did research recently with a small group of young people involved in county lines, and everyone who took part said that going missing was a key feature, especially in the early stages of criminal exploitation.”Another factor thought to be driving the trend of children being reported missing is a drop in the number of parents or teachers reporting them as “absent” instead.  “Our national ‘tackling child exploitation’ support programme is helping specialists in education, social care, health, the police and the voluntary sector to improve how they respond to these kinds of threats in their communities, including gangs, county lines drug activity and trafficking, and our serious violence strategy includes a range of actions to combat county lines.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. County lines drug networks have been blamed for a huge spike in the number of children identified as having links to gangs, after the figure more than doubled in three years.Social services in England carried out 8,650 assessments of young people whom they labelled as vulnerable with gangs highlighted as an issue in 2017-18. It marked a significant jump on 2014-15, when 3,680 such cases were recorded.A similar trend was found in the number of children who went missing during the same period – from 8,850 to 16,070 – which is considered a trait of county lines networks.Drugs gangs increasingly recruit vulnerable children to ferry narcotics from cities to smaller towns, with around 2,000 operations believed to be operating across the UK. Ann Coffey, the MP for Stockport and chair of the all-party Parliamentary committee on runaway and missing children and adults, told the newspaper: “What concerns me is that we are not really making inroads on arresting and taking those senior gang leaders out of county lines. As long as they continue to operate, the number of children exploited will continue to grow.”A Government spokesman said: “Any child that goes missing from home, school or care could be in danger of exploitation from gangs or violent criminals – that’s why we are equipping the professionals who protect vulnerable children to help them identify those who are most at risk and keep them safe. read more

Banks DIH donates over 4M to charities

Banks DIH donates over 4M to charities

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedPension raised for Banks DIH retired employeesFebruary 22, 2016In “latest news”Banks DIH rewards 23 NGSA highflyers with bursariesSeptember 5, 2017In “Local News”Citizens Bank profits plummet during peak business seasonMay 24, 2017In “Business”,Banks DIH Limited on Monday made its annual donation to charities which amounted to over $4 million.Representatives of the 25 charities that benefited pose with the company’s Chairman, Clifford Reis (back row, second from right) and Managing Director, George McDonaldAt a simple ceremony held at Thirst Park, Greater Georgetown, the cheques were handed over to the 25 charities by the company’s Chairman, Clifford Reis and Managing Director, George McDonald.The donations are done annually after shareholders of the company approve a sum of money to be disbursed under the heading “Deeds of covenant with organisations”.Some of the charities that received donations are the Salvation Army, Uncle Eddie’s Home, Dharma Shala, the Blind Society, Guyana Seventh-Day Adventist Churches, and the Young Women’s Christian Association among others.This is the first time that the company held a ceremony to hand over the donations.Banks DIH, throughout the years, has continued to aid the Guyanese public making donations when necessary. Major donations are made to the education sector and also to promote sports in Guyana.Funds are even sent abroad to help when disaster strikes. Banks DIH Limited on Monday made its annual donation to charities which amounted to over $4 million.Representatives of the 25 charities that benefited pose with the company’s Chairman, Clifford Reis (back row, second from right) and Managing Director, George McDonaldAt a simple ceremony held at Thirst Park, Greater Georgetown, the cheques were handed over to the 25 charities by the company’s Chairman, Clifford Reis and Managing Director, George McDonald.The donations are done annually after shareholders of the company approve a sum of money to be disbursed under the heading “Deeds of covenant with organisations”.Some of the charities that received donations are the Salvation Army, Uncle Eddie’s Home, Dharma Shala, the Blind Society, Guyana Seventh-Day Adventist Churches, and the Young Women’s Christian Association among others.This is the first time that the company held a ceremony to hand over the donations.Banks DIH, throughout the years, has continued to aid the Guyanese public making donations when necessary. Major donations are made to the education sector and also to promote sports in Guyana.Funds are even sent abroad to help when disaster strikes. read more