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Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast, September 17, 2018

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast, September 17, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  The remains of Hurricane Florence are working northward today, and will bring rain to about 60% of Ohio. We expect rain totals to run anywhere from a few hundredths to perhaps 1.25″ or more, depending on where thunderstorms and longer term rain streaks develop. Right now, we think the best chances for thunderstorms will be far south near the Ohio River, ,and then in east central OH into western PA. The upper end of the rain range will be over southern OH and the eastern third. There is a good chance we see nothing but clouds farther west in west central OH, and even a mix of clouds and sun in NW Ohio…so today’s weather spread may be all over the place, thanks to the remains of Florence. Temperatures do remain warmer than normal today, even with the rain. South flow will be key to keeping temps warm. The map at right shows potential for today’s rain.Drier weather is back for tomorrow, and we should stay dry for Wednesday and Thursday as well. The front we had been watching last week for midweek on Wednesday late afternoon has completely fallen apart down this way, and moisture looks to stay farther north, across WI, northern IL and into MI. But, even though we are taking moisture out at midweek, we are going to have to pay for it later. That payment comes due starting early Friday.Three waves of moisture will move over the state from Friday through Sunday, one for each day period. The first wave his for Friday, and goes into the evening, then another batch of moisture comes Saturday and a final batch Sunday. Combined, all three systems bring potential for half to 1.5” rains over about 90% of the state. We think a few areas see all three waves, but most areas see at least two of the three hitting over the 3-day period. This will bring a slowdown to harvest field work.Dry weather is back for next Monday through Wednesday. Temps will be a bit cooler behind the weekend rains but will stay mostly near normal for the period. Then, we kick off the extended 11-16 day window with a strong front for next Thursday and Friday, the 27th and 28th. This front brings half to 1.5” inch rain potential to a full 100% of the state. This front also ushers in much cooler Canadian high pressure out of the west. We expect temps to move to below normal levels to finish out the extended period, while dry weather finishes out the month and kicks off October. For the 29th and 30th, we think it wise to be on the look out for temps bottoming out near 40 degrees, and we won’t rule out a few upper 30s. A map of potential morning lows for the 30th is at right. However, keep in mind that there is plenty of time for that to change, though. Just putting it out there this morning.last_img read more

The crime ministers

The crime ministers

first_imgThe symbolism surrounding the Commonwealth Games never ends. Just five days before the official opening, portions of three key roads in the Capital collapsed, one sinkhole big enough to swallow a bus. The Delhi Government has spent Rs 650 crore on “widening, strengthening and resurfacing of roads” and so far,,The symbolism surrounding the Commonwealth Games never ends. Just five days before the official opening, portions of three key roads in the Capital collapsed, one sinkhole big enough to swallow a bus. The Delhi Government has spent Rs 650 crore on “widening, strengthening and resurfacing of roads” and so far, two dozen cave-ins have been reported from various parts of the city since July. It was yet another ominous portent for an event already mired in scandals and embarrassing failures.The last minute interventions at the highest levels of government seem to have salvaged some pride but it could not compensate for the damage to the country’s image and the growing sense of anger among residents of Delhi and the feeling that the Games were used as a cover-up for large scale loot. The true extent of that will only emerge after the event is over since the Central Vigilance Commission (CVC) inquiries and other audits on cost overruns, corruption and deliberate delays have been put on the backburner, again to save national pride.But the contours of what is potentially the biggest collective scam in modern India have already emerged. Such is the cynicism that SMS jokes doing the rounds refer to CWG boss Suresh Kalmadi as Chef de Commission. Kalmadi may not have put his hand in the till, as he declares often, but certainly there is enough evidence to show that the embarrassments and scandals have not ended. They may have just begun.It starts with the showpiece of the CWG, the Village. The basements in the Games Village towers are flooded because the builders, Emaar MGF, in league with the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), violated the original norms. Each tower was meant to have two levels of basement parking since the flats were to be sold after the Games. To increase the number of flats, the builders ensured that the final design had just one basement level. That’s not all.advertisementThe massive water seepage in the basement is because the foundation level is lower than that of the Yamuna River, just 150 metre away. The seepage has caused lifts and other electrical fittings to malfunction. Initially, the Games Village was to be built near Bawana, but it was shifted to the current location near the Yamuna at the insistence of Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit. It was a violation of the National Capital Region Plan that calls for decongestion of Delhi by focusing on development of satellite towns. The controversial project started on the PPP model with the DDA joining hands with Emaar MGF.A portion of Delhi’s Vikas Marg caves in after rains.Once construction was on in full swing, the latter claimed to have run out of funds and was bailed out by the DDA which bought 333 flats for Rs 766 crore last year. The real situation came to light only when the project was completed in June this year and the extra flats were discovered in areas originally meant for parking. DDA sources now say that Rs 250 crore, a part of the bailout amount, was diverted by Emaar MGF to other projects they were involved in. Delhi’s Lieutenant Governor Tejendra Khanna has now ordered an audit and quality report to ascertain how original rules were flouted by the builders and whether the DDA was in the know all along. At the intervention of Khanna, who is also its chairman, the DDA gave Emaar MGF a temporary completion certificate so that the Village could be used for the Games.The Scapegoat?: Suresh Kalmadi takes the flak but the blame extends far beyond his jurisdiction.”The lieutenant governor has ordered to keep the bank guarantee of the developer alive till the enquiry is complete,” says Ranjan Mukherjee, Khanna’s Officer on Special Duty for the CWG.Then there is the scandal surrounding the Rs 5-crore pedestrian overbridge at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium that collapsed last month and is now the most potent symbol of how most of the CWG projects were marred by huge cost over-runs, poor site management, delays and quality compromises. Remarking that the overbridge “collapsed like a pack of cards”, the Supreme Court slammed the Centre and Delhi government for “rampant corruption” in the Games “where the payments are made without work being done”.The bridge was being constructed under the supervision of Delhi Government’s Public Works Department (PWD). It was designed by Tandon Consultants Private Limited, based in Jangpura, Delhi, who were debarred for two years in July 2009 by the Delhi Metro following an accident where a cantilever arm gave in at Zamrudpur in south Delhi. An enquiry revealed “serious” deficiency in their design. The contractor was Chandigarh-based PR Infrastructures who were involved in another overbridge, construction of which has now been stopped. Another potential scam is the Rs 650-crore contract for upgrading streetlights across Delhi.advertisementAGENCIES THAT GOT YOU CWG 2010Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF): Owner of the Commonwealth GamesOrganising Committee (OC): Responsible for successful conduct of the GamesGovernment of IndiaMinistry of Youth Affairs and Sports: Nodal Ministry responsible for the Games Group of Ministers, chaired by Urban Development Minister: Responsible for top-level policy decisionsCommittee of Secretaries, chaired by Cabinet Secretary: Monitors implementation of policy decisionsGOVERNMENT OF NATIONAL CAPITAL TERRITORY OF DELHI (GNCTD)Lieutenant Governor: Responsible for security, law & order and DDA-related workChief Minister’s Committee: Responsible for infrastructure and other activities within GNCTDEmpowered Committee Chaired by chief secretary: Oversees projects executed by the GNCTD and its agenciesImplementing Agencies (For infrastructure and venue development)PARIMAL RAI, NDMC ChairmanCentral PWD, DDA, NDMC, MCD, GNCTD (PWD), Engineers India Ltd and RITES LtdK.S. MEHRA, MCD CommissionerA.K. NIGAM, DDA Vice-chairman  The project was to replace perfectly functional street lighting systems with a new one. The New Delhi Municipal Corporation (NDMC) floated a tender for the project, with an estimated cost of Rs 62 crore. Phillips Electronics India agreed to execute the project at Rs 34 crore, which indicated that the project budget was outlandish. That a scam was in the making was evidenced by the fact that MLA Karan Singh Tanwar, who is also a member of the NDMC, raised the issue and officially recorded his dissent.There have been allegations that NDMC Chairman Parimal Rai has been sheltering the chief engineer in charge of the project. The vigilance department of the NDMC diverted the issue by putting the blame for delays and cost over-runs on two assistant engineers, one of who has already retired. Later it was concluded that “there was no mala fide intention.”That will be under scrutiny when the Games are over and the full-scale investigation into the delays and sub-standard work begins. The technical wing of the CVC has inspected 16 Games-related projects which came under the Union Sports Ministry, Urban Development Ministry and the Delhi Government and made damaging revelations. Its report says that all the organisations executing works for the Games had used “inadmissible factors” to raise the budgeted costs citing “urgent/emergent circumstances”. Further, certain items, which were not part of the tender, were later incorporated in the contract at higher rates.There’s more. Of all the upgrades that greet Delhi citizens these days, the most common are the swanky new buses ordered to ferry athletes and CWG officials. The Delhi government spent Rs 1,800 crore to augment the existing fleet with 2,276 extra buses and spent another Rs 900 crore to construct bus depots to house them.The combined expenditure is three times the cost of constructing the main Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium. This translates into an average cost of Rs 80 lakh per bus. What has raised eyebrows in official circles is that a state-of-the-art Volvo luxury ac bus is available in India for Rs 40 lakh, exactly half of what the Dikshit Government paid.advertisementThere have been numerous other instances highlighted by the media but nothing illustrates official apathy and lack of priorities more than the fact that even while the scandals and embarrassments were piling up with venues unfinished and shoddy workmanship, the highest official body responsible for the Games, the Group of Ministers under Urban Development Minister, Jaipal Reddy, in their last two meetings on September 6 and 16, discussed just two issues: the opening and closing ceremonies. With that sort of priority, it’s no wonder that the CWG has become a symbol of India’s backwardness rather than a showpiece for India Rising.last_img read more

In the Twilight zone: H.M. Naqvi on Karachi

In the Twilight zone: H.M. Naqvi on Karachi

first_imgH.M. NaqviMany cities are founded by gods, heroes, conquerors but Karachi emerges from nothing, from stories. There are stories about Ram and Sita sojourning in a verdant cove that would become a canton of the city. There are stories about a wandering Sufi who settled by a creek and in,H.M. NaqviMany cities are founded by gods, heroes, conquerors but Karachi emerges from nothing, from stories. There are stories about Ram and Sita sojourning in a verdant cove that would become a canton of the city. There are stories about a wandering Sufi who settled by a creek and in time the lice he shook from his head metamorphosed into crocodiles. There are stories about some natural calamity, an earthquake perhaps, that compelled the inhabitants of nearby bastis to populate the scrim of coast on the Arabian Sea that is now populated by some 18.2 million souls officially (21 million unofficially).Karachi is vast and varied. It might rain in Orangi but it remains sunny in Pipri. There might be street battles in Lyari while families picnic on the seaside at Sandspit. There are Balochi neighbourhoods such as Razaqabad where women are holed up in dull, concrete, single-storied structures, and cantons that include McNeil Road where Christian matrons wander on the streets in skirts. Any attempt then to distill the city into discourse is fraught, if not always futile. One might begin with one’s own story, one’s own Karachi.****My grandfather arrived in the city not long after the sudden, sundering inception of India and Pakistan. He would wind up in a onebedroom, ground-floor portion of a semi-detached house in Paposh Nagar that featured low ceilings, flimsy doors, paved concrete floors, and despite the sehen in the back, could feel somewhat claustrophobic. The household comprised some 15 members then, many of whom sprawled on charpoys under the sky at night because it would be warm inside.advertisementPeople celebrate Pakistan Independence day in Karachi in 2011.Recently, I visited Paposh Nagar after an eon. When I arrived, the curious neighbourhood children, tossing a wizened tennis ball, inquired after me, and when I told them my grandfather lived here, they informed the landlord’s wife of my visit. “My husband’s at the shop,” she said, hand on hip- the same shop his father ran half a century ago.We used to look up to the landlord, literally and figuratively: He lived above us, he owned real estate, ran a business. Whereas there were times when my grandfather would not be able to feed his eight children and would have to dispatch them to his in-laws. My slight, unschooled, sariclad, Purbi-speaking grandmother, however, made certain that her children were educated, that they worked hard, that they excelled. Consequently, in the span of a generation, almost all her children moved from one part of town to the other. They would become doctors, engineers, chartered accountants, bankers and one joined the foreign service. Although my grandfather died in a rented house, his sons would, in time, purchase land, build homes, make a life for themselves.****The story of Karachi is a story of immigration. After all, save the crocodiles at Mungho Pir, there was nothing to Karachi 300 years ago. But when scattered communities of fishermen congregated in and around Karachi, the Baloch rulers of Sind took note. By the 18th century, the latter tried to capture the emergent trading post thrice. Karachiwallahs only relented in 1795 on the condition that the Baloch would not enter town. As a result, the conquering force set up camp along the Lyari River-the second wave of immigrants to the city. In 1800, Karachiwallahs threw out the small British contingent that had set up a factory within the town limits. The denizens of Karachi have always been hardy and fiercely independent.The third wave of immigrants came after 1831, after the bloody battle at Miani where British forces slaughtered 10,000 locals to secure Sind. They were Parsi, Goan, Lohana, Bohra. Last month, I met with the Bohra Lanewallah clan, one of the oldest extant families of Karachi. They owned vast swaths of real estate once, including the spectacular Sayfi Apartments, home to many of the city’s Jews. At one juncture, the Lanewallahs were among the most prosperous families in the city. Things, however, have since changed: The Jews have packed up and the Sayfi Apartments have frayed. The dynamic of immigration is straightforward: Each wave displaces the last. And each community grates against the other, then coexists.Unlike Lahore or Islamabad, Karachi is not pretty. It’s a rough and tumble megalopolis like Sao Paulo, like Mumbai, that features a hardy, dynamic populace.There are periods when other immigrant communities are at daggers drawn-Mohajir, Pathan, Balochi, Sindhi-followed by periods of relative amity. In the last decade, Karachi mostly flourished. Trash was collected. Parks sprang up. Roads, water lines were laid. Above all, law and order was maintained. In 2001, for instance, the homicide per capita rate in the city was lower than Boston, than Seattle. Things changed circa 2008. The detritus from the war on the border flowed downstream. Turf wars became routine. This summer, Lyari, a troubled canton ruled by feuding mafias (much like Dongri), went up in flames. The day I began writing this piece, 12 died in what newspapers term “targeted killings”.Lyari, however, is also renowned for its soccer players, snooker players, boxers and beer halls. Since I enjoy beer, I had tried visiting several times but each time I attempted I was told “it’s not such a good time”. During the soccer World Cup, however, Pax Lyrariana was declared. Massive screens were set up (reportedly 26 altogether), courtesy of the reigning don, Uzair Balouch. Thousands spilled on to the streets, some swilling beer, all championing Spain. (When I asked a Makrani boy raising a large yellow flag, Why Spain, given the expulsion of Muslims, the inquisition, he thoughtfully replied, Yes, but they still have Muslim blood in them!)advertisementAt halftime, I was summoned by Uzair. I expected a large, fearsome character. Instead, I found myself face to face with a handsome, soft-spoken fellow about my age, sporting a Brazil jersey. “You’ve come from outside,” he said. “Tell them to give us money for our stadiums, for the youth.”A stone’s throw from Lyari is Lee Market, an animate commercial mecca of the city, offering everything from tea and tinned products to nuts and dry goods. In offices the size of closets, Memons, Punjabis and Pathans conduct trade worth millions of rupees daily. And they will tell you that Uzair’s men run a massive extortion racket. One powdered milk merchant informed me, “Once upon a time the MQM collected bhatta. But they left it. Maybe they have other things to do.”****There are other stories, other dynamics that inform Karachi but routinely escape discourse. Once I visited Qazafi Town, a far-flung canton populated by Waziris, Pathans who hail from the troubled badlands of the country bordering Afghanistan. Had I walked into a home in Waziristan (especially being a Shia), I might have been deemed wajib-e-qatl, or “liable to be killed”, but in Qazafi Town I was invited into a co-ed home-school by two young women.Their mother, a tough matriarch, sat surveying her domain on a charpoy, while their brother, a bearded character with his shalwar above his ankles, was on his way to the mosque around the corner- rumoured to be patronised by the sectarian terrorist outfit, Sipah-e-Sahaba. How, I wondered, did he allow the school to function?I learned that after his father’s death, he became responsible for three women. Consequently, when approached by a local start-up NGO, he made an economic decision, not a religious one: By allowing the home-school, his sisters would receive a salary, free medical treatment (via a monthly mobile health clinic) and the school-his house-received floor mats, a water cooler. In a few years, he changed the way he lived and thought, the way his people lived and thought for centuries.advertisementFLAME, the organisation funding the homeschool (and hundreds around the country), is characteristic of the private social initiatives that define the life of the city. A student leader Adeeb Rizvi, built SIUT, a free, world-class kidney hospital from scratch. A group of businessmen that include Jameel Yusuf founded the Citizens Police Liaison Committee, an institution cited by the UN as a model for crime prevention. Humanitarians such as Akhter Hamid Khan, a pioneer in microfinance and “bottom up community development”, and Abdul Sattar Edhi-founder of a social welfare programme that operates the largest ambulance service in the world, not to mention orphanages, clinics and women’s shelters-have been Nobel contenders. Where the state fails, Karachiwallahs pick up the slack.****Unlike Lahore or Islamabad, Karachi is not pretty. It’s a rough and tumble megalopolis like Sao Paulo, like Mumbai, that features a hardy, dynamic populace. Karachiwallahs make Karachi Karachi. The city is populated by thugs and humanitarians, businessmen and novelists. No other city in Pakistan (or say, Austria for that matter) could sustain something like the Karachi Literature Festival. No other city can boast weekly qawwalis and mushairas as well as art exhibitions and plays. Karachi has changed dramatically in three centuries and will continue changing at the same pace. Whether it will change for the better or worse is a matter best left to punters and political pundits. I need qawwali, a plate of nihari and the energy of a megalopolis.Like my grandfather, I might not own any real estate in the city (or, for the record, anywhere else), but I have carved a life for myself here. As a storyteller, Karachi fascinates. There’s a story under every stone.-The writer is an award-winning author of Home Boy. He lives in Karachi. His next novel, to be out in 2013, is set in the city.last_img read more