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Letters to the Editor for Monday, May 6

Letters to the Editor for Monday, May 6

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionStop the slander and get more informedToo often, we fire words with reckless intent to smear and demean.A recent writer’s brash claim, “Many Americans are surrendering their values” supporting a president whose “motives are driven by narcissism” trashes both our president and voting citizens exercising their right.Is the writer privy to the president’s motives, or uttering the mantras of a hostile media?Continuing to “illustrate” surrender of “values,” the “horrified” writer asserts, with nary a shred of evidence, that appointing William Barr as attorney general was a “sinister plot” by Trump to gain a protector in the position of the office. She then declares, in an unclear and unsubstantiated statement, “he has forever tainted and dishonored the office of United States Attorney General.”We bear the responsibility to be informed. Though we no longer rely on the media to report facts, we have easy access to information. Bill Barr’s Memorandum of 8 June 2018 on Mueller’s “Obstruction” Theory addressed to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is online. You will find more than 18 pages of articulate, carefully measured and weighed reasoning, referencing many legal cases. Kids get a taste of reality about vapingHere’s a lesson for you.One of my daughter’s friends, a teacher, stopped by and told me about a recent lesson she taught at one of the local middle schools.She started her lesson by saying to her 13-year-old students, “Today, we are going to make milkshakes, and we are going to use some of the same ingredients that are used in making e-cigarettes. Let’s start with blueberries. Flavor is important to both concoctions. Next, a little formaldehyde. It’s used to manufacture the colorless, gaseous stuff that makes the smoke in e-pens. Yes, it’s used in fertilizers and embalming fluids, but only large amounts are harmful.Next is the e-liquid. That’s the propellant used to get the smoke into the lungs. It causes cancer in rats and heart disease in humans, but only if used to excess. How about a little arsenic? It’s used in rat poison, but it keeps the ingredients in vape machines free of rodents in stores. Then, a little cyanide. It’s only dangerous in large amounts, but it, too, adds flavor to the smoke inhaled. In keeping with that flavor, let’s add a little yogurt. Our milkshake is complete and just as tasty as those trendy little e-pens. Now, who wants to try my milkshake?”  No hands went up, but a great discussion took place on whether to vape or not to vape.Allen R. RemaleySaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccinecenter_img U.S. Attorney General Barr is not a novice. He has served under a previous president. His reports to Congress are patient, intelligent, “just the facts” responses to even the most hostile and rude congressional members.Let us all determine to stop the slander and false accusations that ignite hostility.An informed citizenry engaging in civil discussion is one of the greatest blessings in our democratic republic and we ought to carefully safeguard it.Joanne DarlingPattersonvillelast_img read more

Biden blasts Trump’s photo op in front of riot-damaged church

Biden blasts Trump’s photo op in front of riot-damaged church

first_imgBiden, the presumptive Democratic presidential candidate in the November election, slammed Trump for “using the American military against the American people,” after the president vowed to order an army crackdown on the sweeping civil unrest.”He tear-gassed peaceful protesters and fired rubber bullets. For a photo,” Biden tweeted late Monday. “For our children, for the very soul of our country, we must defeat him.”Biden also announced he would speak Tuesday in Philadelphia “on the civil unrest facing communities across America.”Washington’s mayor Muriel Bowser called the move “shameful”.”I imposed a curfew at 7pm,” she tweeted. “A full 25 minutes before the curfew & w/o provocation, federal police used munitions on peaceful protestors in front of the White House, an act that will make the job of @DCPoliceDept officers more difficult.”New York governor Andrew Cuomo also expressed outrage over the incident.”What the president did today was he called out the American military against American citizens,” Cuomo tweeted.”He used the military to push out a peaceful protest so he could have a photo op at a church. It’s all just a reality TV show for this president.”The visit enraged Washington’s Episcopal bishop, Marian Budde.The president did not seek permission for the visit, she told CNN, condemning his use of a Bible, failure to pray, failure to acknowledge the agony of Americans and decision to use tear gas on protesters to make the visit.”I am outraged… we distance ourselves from the incendiary language of this president,” she said.”I just can’t believe what my eyes have seen tonight… I had no idea,” she added. Topics : As he spoke, law enforcement — including military police — could be seen firing tear gas to clear peaceful protesters in Lafayette Park, outside the White House, so the president could walk over to the church. Known as “the Church of the Presidents,” St. John’s was sprayed with graffiti and partially damaged by fire during unrest on Sunday.”We have a great country,” Trump declared just outside the Episcopal church, where he held up a Bible. He did not answer questions from reporters before leaving again. The backlash was swift.  US President Donald Trump spurred fresh outrage Monday after police used tear gas to clear protesters from outside the White House so he could pose for photographs at a nearby church damaged during civil unrest.The move earned him a sharp rebuke from the city mayor, the Episcopal bishop, and leading Democrats including former vice president Joe Biden, who decried the use of force merely “for a photo.”Trump’s visit to the historic St John’s Church, across the street from the White House came after he delivered an address denouncing vandalism that has followed anti-racism protests that have gripped the country for a week. last_img read more

England’s WC winner Jack Charlton passes away

England’s WC winner Jack Charlton passes away

first_imgLONDON: England World Cup winner and legendary Leeds United defender Jack Charlton breathed his last at the age of 85.Leeds confirmed the news on their official website that their former centre-back had passed away on Friday night following a long-term illness. “Leeds United are deeply saddened to learn club legend Jack Charlton passed away last night at the age of 85 following a long-term illness. “Charlton made a club record 773 appearances for Leeds United over a 23-year period as a player, becoming one of the all-time great central defenders in the game. “He joined the club at the age of 15 in 1950 as part of the ground staff, before signing professional terms and was handed a debut against Doncaster Rovers on Saturday 25th April 1953 in a 1-1 draw at Elland Road,” the statement on leedsunited.com, said. Charlton had featured in every match during the 1966 World Cup which England went on to win, defeating West Germany 4-2 in the final at Wembley — England’s only World Cup success to date. Charlton called time on his career at the end of the 1972/73 season, with his final game coming against Southampton in 1973. He won a total of 35 caps for England, scoring six goals for his country. IANS ALSO WATCH: VEGETABLE PRICES BURN HOLE IN COMMON MAN’S POCKET IN GUWAHATIlast_img read more

UConn nears Big East return after conference presidents’ vote, report says

UConn nears Big East return after conference presidents’ vote, report says

first_img Lincoln Riley has 4.6 million reasons not to leave Oklahoma for NFL If approved by trustees, a formal announcement of UConn rejoining the Big East could happen as soon as Thursday.Among the details of the move, unidentified sources told The Courant: “(T)he exit fee from the AAC could be as high as $12 million because UConn would not be giving a full 27 months notice. The first payment of $2.5 million would be due once UConn notified the AAC of its withdrawal. The Big East entry fee is believed to be about $2.5 million.” Related News Neither the Big East nor multiple athletic departments in the conference would comment to the Courant on Monday’s vote.UConn has not offered a statement since its one Saturday that read: “It is our responsibility to always be mindful of what is in the best interest of our student athletes, our fans and our future. With that being said, we have been and remain proud members of the American Athletic Conference.”But for how long?The UConn athletic department has struggled in recent years with finances, most notably facing a $41 million deficit in 2018 that was offset by school and student fees. While the Huskies women’s basketball team has continued to thrive, the department’s two biggest expected revenue-producers — the football and men’s basketball teams — have struggled.Now, where coach Randy Edsall’s football team stands is in question as the university appears poised to join a conference that doesn’t compete in football.For his part, Edsall continued to tweet about his program, sending updates Monday on recruiting, new uniforms and a renovated locker room.Just before 1 p.m. ET, however, Edsall tweeted a gif of the character Sergeant Schultz from the ’60s era situation comedy “Hogan’s Heroes” that said, “I see nothing, I hear nothing. I KNOW NOTHING!” UConn moved another step closer to rejoining the Big East after a vote Monday by conference presidents to extend an invitation, according to multiple reports.The details of the potential move from the American Athletic Conference are set to be reviewed by Connecticut Attorney General William Tong and then the UConn Board of Trustees would meet at 9:30 a.m. ET Wednesday to vote on whether to accept, the Hartford Courant reported.center_img Why North Carolina basketball could look very different soon pic.twitter.com/lNcuu9Mb58— Randy Edsall (@RandyEdsall) June 22, 2019Edsall has not spoken publicly on the pending move.Meanwhile, initial conversations this week among AAC officials and representatives from member schools indicate the conference is unlikely to replace UConn, The Cincinnati Enquirer reported, citing an unidentified source.An 11-team AAC could eliminate divisions in football and instead match the two teams with the highest rankings in its conference championship game. That, the Enquirer’s source said, would help raise the conference’s profile and perhaps better position it for a College Football Playoff berth or, outside that, more prestigious bowl bids.last_img read more

Administration Wants To Use ValueBased Care Models To Rescue Medicare But Their

Administration Wants To Use ValueBased Care Models To Rescue Medicare But Their

first_img In other Medicare news — Modern Healthcare: White House Puts Faith In Value-Based Pay Tweaks To Save Medicare  Simplifying value-based care models and lowering spending on care delivery are key focuses for the Trump administration as it looks to shore up the Medicare trust fund, according to a senior White House official. Earlier this year, the Trump administration revealed that the Medicare trust fund will be insolvent by 2026, three years earlier than last year’s estimate. Government officials have touted shifting more beneficiaries to value-based pay models rather than fee for service as a way to maintain the federal health program. (Dickson, 9/20) Administration Wants To Use Value-Based Care Models To Rescue Medicare, But Their Savings So Far Have Been Limited Part of the problem is that the real-life application of the models is far too complicated to analyze. But experts say if the government overhauls how models are developed they might save money. Modern Healthcare: RACs Seek To Regain Reviewing Privileges For Medicare Claims  Recovery Audit Contractors are hoping a new report on the hundreds of millions they’ve recovered for Medicare will cause the CMS to reverse course on its decision to limit the number of claims they can review. RACs recovered $473.92 million in improper payments in fiscal year 2016, according to a report issued Monday by the CMS. That number is up from $440.69 million in fiscal year 2015. (Dickson, 9/19) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more