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Gov. Wolf: State Police Deserve Adequate Funding Without Impacting Resources for Infrastructure

Gov. Wolf: State Police Deserve Adequate Funding Without Impacting Resources for Infrastructure

first_imgGov. Wolf: State Police Deserve Adequate Funding Without Impacting Resources for Infrastructure Press Release,  Public Safety Harrisburg, PA – At a press conference with legislators and the Pennsylvania State Police (PSP), Governor Tom Wolf today called for support for legislation that will impose a fee to municipalities that do not have a local police department and rely solely on State Police for local police coverage.“We all want safe communities,” Gov. Wolf said. “That means adequate police protection and structurally sound roads and bridges. But right now, some municipalities are not paying their fair share for police protection, and to compensate for that deficit, money is being taken from the Motor License Fund that would otherwise go to our roads and bridges.”Rep. Mike Sturla’s House Bill 959 and Sen. Jay Costa’s Senate Bill 741 will correct that imbalance by requiring municipalities that rely on state police to chip in on the cost of coverage. The fee will help supplement the funding PSP will lose as the Motor License Fund draw-down is reduced by 4 percent annually until it is capped in 2027.“This fee is about fairness,” Rep. Sturla said. “While 80 percent of Pennsylvanians pay for their local police services, some with average incomes barely above poverty, 20 percent rely solely on the PSP. The PSP is using Motor License Fund dollars to help fund those patrols and everyone is missing out on road and bridge repair projects that would improve public safety for all. Charging a reasonable fee for the exemplary service the PSP provides will give them the resources needed to provide those services while preserving public safety.”“When local governments disbanded their police forces, our State troopers stepped in to do the work,” Sen. Costa said. “They upheld their oath to protect all of our citizens. The problem in this funding stream is not with our brave men and women who are officers. But they are doing a new job now, and we need a fair, guaranteed revenue for their expanded scope.”“Approximately 10 million taxpayers currently support their own municipal police through local taxes,” State Police Commissioner Col. Robert Evanchick said. “This proposal simply asks the municipalities that do not fund a police department to begin to share in the cost that their neighbors already shoulder. This proposal begins to close the looming budget gap and creates a framework for supporting public safety now and in the years to come.”House Bill 959 and Senate Bill 741 would assess a fee on municipalities where the State Police provides full-time local policing services. The fee would be assessed to the municipality on a per-capita basis according to the most recent decennial census population, excluding the institutionalized population in state Department of Corrections Institutions. Distressed municipalities and those in Act 47 status are exempt from paying the fee.The fee schedule is set on a sliding scale ranging from $8.00 per capita for a municipality with a population up to 2,000, to $166 per capita for municipalities with a population over 20,000.During its first year, the fee would raise an estimated $104 million for PSP operations, services and cadet classes. Any fee increases would occur annually, based on the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) for the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD area. If the CPI-U does not increase, neither would the fee.“I’m asking for support for House Bill 959 and Senate Bill 741, which will help ensure all communities are kept safe without taking anything away from the infrastructure we all share and need,” Gov Wolf said. “It’s time that all Pennsylvanians pay their fair share.” June 11, 2019center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Transfer: Premier League Clubs Net January Profit

Transfer: Premier League Clubs Net January Profit

first_imgPremier League clubs have recorded a transfer window profit for the first time – despite spending reaching a six-year January high of £215m.Southampton and Burnley made late deadline-day deals, while Odion Ighalo moved from Watford to China for £20m.Saints paid about £14m for Napoli’s Manolo Gabbiadini, and the Clarets signed Robbie Brady for up to £13mHowever, top-flight sides brought in £40m more than they paid out, according to finance analysts Deloitte. Premier League teams have spent a record £1.38bn on transfers in the 2016-17 season, after a summer outlay of £1.165bn.Spending in January 2017 is the second highest – behind the record mark of £225m six years ago – and dwarfs the £35m spent in the first January transfer window in 2003.While the window is now closed for the major European leagues, there could still be departures as big-spending China has an official deadline of February 28.Deadline-day sales were led by Nigeria striker Ighalo, 27, moving to Chinese Super League club Changchun Yatai.Burnley were one of the busier sides, recruiting 25-year-old Republic of Ireland international Brady from Norwich for a club-record fee having earlier snapped up another midfielder, Ashley Westwood, from Aston Villa.Southampton bolstered their attacking options by bringing in Gabbiadini, 25, while Crystal Palace secured Liverpool centre-back Mamadou Sakho on loan and signed Serbia midfielder Luka Milivojevic from Greek side Olympiakos.Swansea City signed Aston Villa forward Jordan Ayew in a swap deal that saw Wales defender Neil Taylor go the other way.Several mooted moves did not go through on a relatively low-key day, with Celtic keeper Craig Gordon and striker Moussa Dembele staying with the Scottish champions despite reported interest from Chelsea.Sunderland, thwarted in their attempts to sign forward Leonardo Ulloa from Premier League champions Leicester City, had a bid of about £12m rejected by Southampton for forward Jay Rodriguez.Championship clubs spent a record £40m on deadline day, led by Aston Villa signing forward Scott Hogan from Brentford for a fee that could reach £12m.Wigan sold winger Yanic Wildschut to Norwich for £7m, but they ended the day with eight new players.Sheffield Wednesday have to wait until Wednesday to see if their £9.5m move for Middlesbrough striker Jordan Rhodes had gone through in time.Midfielder Ravel Morrison returned to QPR on a late loan deal from Italian side Lazio, and highly rated West Ham defender Reece Oxford, 18, moved to Reading on loan for the rest of the season.Striker Matty Taylor caused a stir by leaving Bristol Rovers, where he has scored 19 times this season, for local rivals Bristol City – the first time a player has done so since 1987.Championship side City wasted no time in winding up their League One foes, with manager Lee Johnson saying: “It’ll be a big step up in standard for him.”Meanwhile, Neil Danns’ tour of the clubs of the north west beginning with a B saw him tick off Blackpool. The midfielder’s loan deal from Bury follows spells at Bolton and Blackburn. He has also squeezed in Birmingham City and Bristol City along the way.Everton were the Premier League club to spend the most on a single player, paying Manchester United £22m for France midfielder Morgan Schneiderlin.However, the biggest fee was the £60m paid to Chelsea by Chinese Super League side Shanghai SIPG for Brazil attacking midfielder Oscar.Also departing the Premier League was Dimitri Payet – with West Ham accusing the France forward of lacking “commitment and respect” as he rejoined Marseille for £25m.The top six sides did not shell out – the only new purchase among the leading sides being Arsenal’s surprise signing of left-back Cohen Bramall from non-league Hednesford Town for £40,000. He had just been made redundant from his job in a car factory before a trial with the Gunners.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more