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10 months agoHuddersfield close to deal for Leyton Orient starlet Joshua Koroma

10 months agoHuddersfield close to deal for Leyton Orient starlet Joshua Koroma

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Huddersfield close to deal for Leyton Orient starlet Joshua Koromaby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeyton Orient starlet Joshua Koroma is attracting Premier League interest.The Mirror says Huddersfield Town are set to win the race for Leyton Orient whiz Koroma.The 20-year-old has come through the youth ranks at Brisbane Road, and is highly-regarded.He was being tracked by Aston Villa, Derby and Middlesbrough.But the Terriers are now in pole position to hand him a dream move to the Premier League. last_img read more

Video: New York Knicks Fans Wildly Boo Pick Of Kristaps Porzingis

Video: New York Knicks Fans Wildly Boo Pick Of Kristaps Porzingis

first_imgkristaps porzings during a game with the knicksPHOENIX, AZ – JANUARY 26: Kristaps Porzingis #6 of the New York Knicks during the NBA game against the Phoenix Suns at Talking Stick Resort Arena on January 26, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)New York Knicks fans are not happy. The franchise, unfortunately slotted with the fourth pick (despite having the second-worst record in the league) in this year’s NBA Draft, chose Latvian center Kristaps Porzingis over former college stars like Justise Winslow, Frank Kaminsky and Stanley Johnson. The decision, which certainly may not turn out to be the wrong one in the long run, was met with a chorus of boos at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. One young fan was beside himself when he heard the news.Porzingis is just 19, so he may need a year or two to develop into a quality NBA player. It doesn’t look like Knicks fans are going to be patient heading into it all.last_img read more

YRB closing Buick Creek Road between 9 am and 3 pm for

YRB closing Buick Creek Road between 9 am and 3 pm for

first_imgMotorists are advised to plan an alternate route during the hours of the road closure.Anyone with concerns can call the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure at (250) 787-3237. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Officials with Yellowhead Road and Bridge say that the Buick Creek Road will be closed for six hours today.YRB North Peace Project Manager Andrew Stewart said that the road will be closed between 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 13th.Stewart also said that there will also be intermittent closures at the Buick Creek multi-plate pipe, between the Beatton Airport Road/Mile 73 Road and the Prespatou Road.last_img read more

Transparency in payments price

Transparency in payments price

first_imgThe importance of the flow of capital into the power and housing sectors in India cannot be overemphasised. Recent developments in both sectors once again bring to the fore the critical issues of effective payment mechanisms and price transparency as vital factors in boosting the economy. Let us examine the issue in the two sectors separately. The Supreme Court striking down the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) circular giving stressed power companies more time to find resolutions outside the bankruptcy court has started debates around paths that are ideal for resolving woes of the power sector. Amid the din and noise, it is essential to not lose sight of the core issues at hand, i.e., the late and, in many cases, non-payment of dues by state-run power distribution companies (discoms) in India. Also Read – A special kind of bondWhile not all the stressed assets of thermal power sector are attributable to non-payment issues from discoms, delayed payments are significant contributors to the mess. Late payments lead to debt servicing issues and major negative-working capital problems. The most critical aspect of the problem is that not just thermal power sector assets but energy sector assets in general, including the high-growth renewable energy sector, will face identical or similar issues in the foreseeable future unless the delayed payments issue is gradually sorted out. Also Read – Insider threat managementFor instance, in the solar energy sector, which is known for its high capital intensity with the majority of the capital expenditure required upfront, the entire business model is highly dependent on the power purchase agreement (PPA) being honoured. Given the fixed-income nature of payments, it is only natural that debt is utilised to fund a significant component of the business. Delays in payments from discoms will lead to solar energy developers facing debt-servicing issues and therefore, eventually adding to the non-performing assets (NPAs). The issues around debt-servicing and NPAs has serious ramifications from a cost of capital perspective. An improved payment mechanism, timely payment of interest coupons and lower-risk have the cascading positive effect of the lower cost of capital for any given sector. Hence, as the cost of capital in general declines, energy projects with a lower return on asset become viable. Therefore, a lowering of the cost of capital in the energy sector provides a significant boost to asset creation. The reverse holds true: when risk perceptions amongst investors for a sector rise, they reduce the flow of capital to the sector and thus render projects unviable. Resolving issues around discom payments is critical for India’s push towards renewable energy. While solutions will require some hard decisions to be made, the government must push in the right direction. Most importantly, the new sunrise sectors such as renewable energy must learn lessons from the thermal power sector of avoiding payment delays, excessive leverage and unsustainable tariffs. Issues in the thermal power sector provide a template of the pitfalls to avoid in energy sectors across the spectrum. The second sector of our concern here that has seen interesting developments of late is housing finance. Given the recent liquidity crunch faced by the Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs), the news that the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has set up a panel to review the development of the housing finance securitisation market is a welcome step. The broader aim of the panel is to facilitate the flow of high-quality capital to the NBFC sector to boost credit creation in India. Of all the steps towards the standardisation of the housing finance securitisation market, one that deserves most attention is ensuring a mechanism that allows for mark-to-market valuation of the securitised loans. In the long-run for the housing finance securitisation market to indeed facilitate the flow of sizeable quantities of capital and yet avoid major mishaps during periods of credit busts, access to constant pricing information in the market is vital. Standardisation of the pricing of debt-securities can be more challenging than that for equity-based securities. The difficulty arises from the fact that debt-based instruments are issued for multiple tenures as opposed to equity that does not have a maturity date. Hence, standardisation is harder in the case of debt-instruments. Lessons from credit markets in the developed economies in creating credit-based indices that assist the market in pricing loans in the secondary market are crucial. Going forward we must not lose focus on the core issues of “ensuring payment mechanisms” and “price transparency” to boost investor sentiment regarding the crucial power and housing markets in India. (The author heads Development Tracks, an infrastructure advisory firm. The views are strictly personal)last_img read more

2014 Big Ten Media Days Urban Meyer has worries about College Football

2014 Big Ten Media Days Urban Meyer has worries about College Football

OSU football coach Urban Meyer answers questions from the media at the 2014 Big Ten Media Days July 29 in Chicago.Credit: Tim Moody / Lantern sports editorCHICAGO –– Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer expressed his concerns with the new College Football Playoff system during day two of the Big Ten Media Days in Chicago.Meyer said Tuesday that while he believes the new system will be “great,” he worries about “fan fatigue, student-athlete fatigue and student-athlete family fatigue.”“We were talking about that at dinner last night,” Meyer said. “If I am (OSU senior defensive lineman) Michael Bennett’s family, and we go on a nice run, you can plan on spending $20,000 going to the Big Ten Championship Game, going to the semi-final game and going to the championship game.”Meyer said he was worried about his players’ families’ ability to watch their sons play and said he believes something needs to be done.“I think the NCAA — that needs to be addressed,” Meyer said. “How is that family going to not go watch their kid play? If I was on that committee I would have addressed that first.”Meyer went as far to say that be believes the players should be involved.“I think the student-athlete should have a say-so in that,” Meyer said. “It is not just a commissioner’s role. I got a feeling their families will go for free to the national championship game but my starting centers can’t? That’s not right.”Bennett said he thinks the playoff will be fun, but had not yet thought about the cost of travel for families.“That is three big vacation trips in about a month,” Bennett said. “That would be something that families have got to save up for and a lot of families won’t be able to afford.”College Football Playoff Chief Operating Officer Michael Kelly said he was excited about the playoff process, and said that the semi-final and national championship festivities will be similar to those in years past.“We’re going to take the former template of the BCS National Championship game week and transfer that into the College Football Playoff semifinal week,” Kelly said. “And by that they’ll be in town for six nights, but the first half of the event and activities in the community will be front loaded. They’ll have a great time. They’ll enjoy that.”Meyer said he is not so sure.“The kids get to go but the parents have to pay,” Meyer said. “They (parents) drive in the day of the game and they watch the game, and they go home.”Meyer said he believes that a “very small percentage” of his players’ families would be able to afford to travel to the bowl games and “do it the right way.”Bennett said he believes some money could be given to players’ families so that they could attend their sons’ games.“I think that would be nice, and not too much to ask for,” Bennett said of possible funding for the families. “It is not like they need anything extravagant, but to be able to see their children play in big time games instead of having to pick and choose. You don’t want to watch the Big Ten Championship and not have money to watch the national championship.”Meyer said he is not sure if the issue has been addressed yet, but believes it needs to be.“Doesn’t it have to?” Meyer said. “It might have been already discussed. I am hoping it has been. I have not sat in those meetings.”Meyer’s Buckeyes are scheduled to begin the 2014 season at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Md., against Navy Aug. 30. Kickoff is set for noon. read more

Terry rejects Spartak Moscow move

Terry rejects Spartak Moscow move

first_imgFormer Chelsea captain John Terry has closed words going around about his move to Spartak Moscow.He has said that the deal has been called off. Terry had gone to Rome on Saturday and undergone medicals after initial agreement of terms with Spartak Moscow.But after returning to England for a while, he has decided he will no longer be making the move to join the Russian side.“After considerable thought, I have decided to decline a contract offer from Spartak Moscow. I would like to take the opportunity to thank Spartak and wish them and their supporters well for the rest of the season,” Terry said on an Instagram post.“They are an ambitious club and I have been very impressed with their professionalism and the time they have given me. But after assessing this move with my family, we’ve decided this is not the right next move at this time. Good luck Spartak.”Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…last_img read more

Neville Mourinho looks tired and fed up

Neville Mourinho looks tired and fed up

first_imgSky Sports pundit Gary Neville thinks Jose Mourinho is clearly fed up and tired considering his recent short press conference that lasted three minutes.The Red Devils are on a four-game winless run and currently occupy 10th position in the Premier League table after last weekend’s 3-1 defeat to West Ham.However, the Portuguese manager admitted his team’s levels have not been good enough ahead of what he dubbed a tough clash against Newcastle United at Old Trafford.“I have to say he looked fed up,” Neville said on Friday Night Football, before explaining constant media focus can take its toll on managers. “Obviously it’s not been a pleasant few weeks.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.“But we’ve seen over the last five or six years being on television here, sometimes you see managers who have had that run of bad results and you can see they’re aware of fatigue, of coming into press conferences.“I experienced it at Valencia in that last couple of months. Jose Mourinho has had seven matches in the last 18 to 20 days, he does a press conference pre-match and a press conference post-match, so 14 times he’s got to sit in that room and answer those questions when his team aren’t playing well, when his team aren’t getting the results.“He just looks worn to me. Looking at that footage, he looks tired. It’s sad to see actually, it’s not great to see.”last_img read more

Infosys to acquire Noah Consulting in allcash deal

Infosys to acquire Noah Consulting in allcash deal

first_imgContinuing its acquisition spree, Infosys on Monday said that it would acquire Houston-based Noah Consulting in an all-cash deal worth $70 million or Rs 450 crore.Noah Consulting is specialised in providing advanced information management consulting services for the oil and gas industry, Infosys said in a statement.The deal is expected to be completed before the end of the third quarter in the current fiscal year, Infosys said.Following the announcement, Infosys shares went up by 1.5% to trade at Rs 1,111 on the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE).India’s second largest IT firm, which remained “conservative” on acquisitions in the past, is now taking inorganic route to propel its growth after Vishal Sikka became the CEO of the company in August last year.Last month, Sikka had said that the company was mulling over acquisitions ‘similar’ to Accenture and Cognizant. Recently, it has announced a partnership with US-based venture capital firm Vertex Ventures as a part of its strategy to gain access to start-ups that work on disruptive technologies.Vertex Ventures, founded by former Facebook executive Jonathan Heiliger and former Accel Partners executive In Sik Rhee, has so far raised funds worth $141 million to support start-ups in areas “ranging from cloud computing to cyber security.”Further, Infosys had acquired Kallidus, a digital experience solutions firm, in a deal worth $120 million in April. It had also acquired US-based automation technology firm, Panaya, for $200 million in February, NDTV Profit reported.Infosys continued its post robust earnings for the second consecutive quarter in the July-September period, with its profit zooming by 9.8% on a sequential basis.last_img read more

Ruling party cadres intimidate voters in Rangpur polls BNP

Ruling party cadres intimidate voters in Rangpur polls BNP

first_imgRuhul Kabir RizviAccusing the ruling party men of driving out their mayoral candidate’s polling agents from different centres, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) on Thursday voiced strong doubt about neutral election in Rangpur City Corporation, reports UNB.Speaking at a press briefing at the party’s Naya Paltan central office, BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi also alleged that its mayoral candidate Kausar Zaman Babla is being obstructed from visiting polling stations as the Election Commission is playing an ‘inactive’ role.”The ruling party cadres forced out the polling agents of the sheaf of paddy from a number of centers soon after the start of voting. The voters are intimidated so that they don’t go to polling stations. We’ve received the information from our candidate and local leaders,” he said.Under the circumstances, the BNP leader said, “We’re in serious doubt whether the Rangpur City Corporation polls will be held in an impartial manner.”He said the ruling party men spread fear among the supporters of the BNP candidate by visiting their houses before the start of voting.Besides, Rizvi said, a local BNP leader, Shohidul, was arrested in the early hours on Thursday.He alleged that the Election Commission is playing a mysterious role in the polls. “They don’t take any action even after lodging of complaint with them. In fact, the EC is working relentlessly to appease the Awami League-led grand alliance.”The voting at 193 polling stations of the Rangpur City Corporation began at 8am and will continue until 4pm without any break.Outgoing mayor Sarfuddin Ahmed is contesting the election to retain his mayoral position with Awami League ticket while Kausar Zaman Babla and Mostafizur Rahman Mostaf with BNP and Jatiya Party tickets respectively.Rizvi opposed the use of Electronic Voting Machine (EVM) at some polling stations in the polls. “The commission has done it only to make the ruling party happy.”He also alleged that the prime minister’s special envoy and state minister for LGRD Moshiur Rahman Ranga have been influencing the election staying in the Rangpur city for the last few days.last_img read more

Massacre in Myanmar

Massacre in Myanmar

first_imgThis photo was taken on the day the 10 Rohingya men were killed. Paramilitary police officer Aung Min, left, stands guard behind them. The picture was obtained from a Buddhist village elder, and authenticated by witnesses. Photo: Reuters Bound together, the 10 Rohingya Muslim captives watched their Buddhist neighbors dig a shallow grave. Soon afterwards, on the morning of 2 September 2, all 10 lay dead. At least two were hacked to death by Buddhist villagers. The rest were shot by Myanmar troops, two of the gravediggers said.“One grave for 10 people,” said Soe Chay, 55, a retired soldier from Inn Din’s Rakhine Buddhist community who said he helped dig the pit and saw the killings. The soldiers shot each man two or three times, he said. “When they were being buried, some were still making noises. Others were already dead.”The killings in the coastal village of Inn Din marked another bloody episode in the ethnic violence sweeping northern Rakhine state, on Myanmar’s western fringe. Nearly 690,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled their villages and crossed the border into Bangladesh since August. None of Inn Din’s 6,000 Rohingya remained in the village as of October.The Rohingya accuse the army of arson, rapes and killings aimed at rubbing them out of existence in this mainly Buddhist nation of 53 million. The United Nations has said the army may have committed genocide; the United States has called the action ethnic cleansing. Myanmar says its “clearance operation” is a legitimate response to attacks by Rohingya insurgents.Rohingya trace their presence in Rakhine back centuries. But most Burmese consider them to be unwanted immigrants from Bangladesh; the army refers to the Rohingya as “Bengalis.” In recent years, sectarian tensions have risen and the government has confined more than 100,000 Rohingya in camps where they have limited access to food, medicine and education.Reuters has pieced together what happened in Inn Din in the days leading up to the killing of the 10 Rohingya – eight men and two high school students in their late teens.Until now, accounts of the violence against the Rohingya in Rakhine state have been provided only by its victims. The Reuters reconstruction draws for the first time on interviews with Buddhist villagers who confessed to torching Rohingya homes, burying bodies and killing Muslims.This account also marks the first time soldiers and paramilitary police have been implicated by testimony from security personnel themselves. Members of the paramilitary police gave Reuters insider descriptions of the operation to drive out the Rohingya from Inn Din, confirming that the military played the lead role in the campaign.The slain men’s families, now sheltering in Bangladesh refugee camps, identified the victims through photographs shown to them by Reuters. The dead men were fishermen, shopkeepers, the two teenage students and an Islamic teacher.Three photographs, provided to Reuters by a Buddhist village elder, capture key moments in the massacre at Inn Din, from the Rohingya men’s detention by soldiers in the early evening of 1 September to their execution shortly after 10 a.m. on 2 Sept. Two photos – one taken the first day, the other on the day of the killings – show the 10 captives lined up in a row, kneeling. The final photograph shows the men’s bloodied bodies piled in the shallow grave.The Reuters investigation of the Inn Din massacre was what prompted Myanmar police authorities to arrest two of the news agency’s reporters. The reporters, Burmese citizens Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, were detained on Dec. 12 for allegedly obtaining confidential documents relating to Rakhine.Then, on Jan. 10, the military issued a statement that confirmed portions of what Wa Lone, Kyaw Soe Oo and their colleagues were preparing to report, acknowledging that 10 Rohingya men were massacred in the village. It confirmed that Buddhist villagers attacked some of the men with swords and soldiers shot the others dead.The statement coincided with an application to the court by prosecutors to charge Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo under Myanmar’s Official Secrets Act, which dates back to the time of colonial British rule. The charges carry a maximum 14-year prison sentence.But the military’s version of events is contradicted in important respects by accounts given to Reuters by Rakhine Buddhist and Rohingya Muslim witnesses. The military said the 10 men belonged to a group of 200 “terrorists” that attacked security forces. Soldiers decided to kill the men, the army said, because intense fighting in the area made it impossible to transfer them to police custody. The army said it would take action against those involved.Buddhist villagers interviewed for this article reported no attack by a large number of insurgents on security forces in Inn Din. And Rohingya witnesses told Reuters that soldiers plucked the 10 from among hundreds of men, women and children who had sought safety on a nearby beach.Scores of interviews with Rakhine Buddhist villagers, soldiers, paramilitary police, Rohingya Muslims and local administrators further revealed:• The military and paramilitary police organized Buddhist residents of Inn Din and at least two other villages to torch Rohingya homes, more than a dozen Buddhist villagers said. Eleven Buddhist villagers said Buddhists committed acts of violence, including killings. The government and army have repeatedly blamed Rohingya insurgents for burning villages and homes.• An order to “clear” Inn Din’s Rohingya hamlets was passed down the command chain from the military, said three paramilitary police officers speaking on condition of anonymity and a fourth police officer at an intelligence unit in the regional capital Sittwe. Security forces wore civilian clothes to avoid detection during raids, one of the paramilitary police officers said.• Some members of the paramilitary police looted Rohingya property, including cows and motorcycles, in order to sell it, according to village administrator Maung Thein Chay and one of the paramilitary police officers.• Operations in Inn Din were led by the army’s 33rd Light Infantry Division, supported by the paramilitary 8th Security Police Battalion, according to four police officers, all of them members of the battalion.The killings in Inn DinMichael G. Karnavas, a U.S. lawyer based in The Hague who has worked on cases at international criminal tribunals, said evidence that the military had organized Buddhist civilians to commit violence against Rohingya “would be the closest thing to a smoking gun in establishing not just intent, but even specific genocidal intent, since the attacks seem designed to destroy the Rohingya or at least a significant part of them.”Evidence of the execution of men in government custody also could be used to build a case of crimes against humanity against military commanders, Karnavas said, if it could be shown that it was part of a “widespread or systematic” campaign targeting the Rohingya population. Kevin Jon Heller, a University of London law professor who served as a legal associate for convicted war criminal and former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, said an order to clear villages by military command was “unequivocally the crime against humanity of forcible transfer.”In December, the United States imposed sanctions on the army officer who had been in charge of Western Command troops in Rakhine, Major General Maung Maung Soe. So far, however, Myanmar has not faced international sanctions over the violence. Myanmar’s leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, has disappointed many former supporters in the West by not speaking out against the army’s actions. They had hoped the election of her National League for Democracy party in 2015 would bring democratic reform and an opening of the country. Instead, critics say, Suu Kyi is in thrall to the generals who freed her from house arrest in 2010.Asked about the evidence Reuters has uncovered about the massacre, government spokesman Zaw Htay said, “We are not denying the allegations about violations of human rights. And we are not giving blanket denials.” If there was “strong and reliable primary evidence” of abuses, the government would investigate, he said. “And then if we found the evidence is true and the violations are there, we will take the necessary action according to our existing law.”When told that paramilitary police officers had said they received orders to “clear” Inn Din’s Rohingya hamlets, he replied, “We have to verify. We have to ask the Ministry of Home Affairs and Myanmar police forces.” Asked about the allegations of looting by paramilitary police officers, he said the police would investigate.He expressed surprise when told that Buddhist villagers had confessed to burning Rohingya homes, then added, “We recognize that many, many different allegations are there, but we need to verify who did it. It is very difficult in the current situation.”Zaw Htay defended the military operation in Rakhine. “The international community needs to understand who did the first terrorist attacks. If that kind of terrorist attack took place in European countries, in the United States, in London, New York, Washington, what would the media say?”NEIGHBOR TURNS ON NEIGHBORInn Din lies between the Mayu mountain range and the Bay of Bengal, about 50 km (30 miles) north of Rakhine’s state capital Sittwe. The settlement is made up of a scattering of hamlets around a school, clinic and Buddhist monastery. Buddhist homes cluster in the northern part of the village. For many years there had been tensions between the Buddhists and their Muslim neighbors, who accounted for almost 90 percent of the roughly 7,000 people in the village. But the two communities had managed to co-exist, fishing the coastal waters and cultivating rice in the paddies.In October 2016, Rohingya militants attacked three police posts in northern Rakhine – the beginning of a new insurgency. After the attacks, Rohingya in Inn Din said many Buddhists stopped hiring them as farmhands and home help. The Buddhists said the Rohingya stopped showing up for work.On Aug. 25 last year, the rebels struck again, hitting 30 police posts and an army base. The closest attack was just 4 km to the north. In Inn Din, several hundred fearful Buddhists took refuge in the monastery in the center of the village, more than a dozen of their number said. Inn Din’s Buddhist night watchman San Thein, 36, said Buddhist villagers feared being “swallowed up” by their Muslim neighbors. A Buddhist elder said all Rohingya, “including children,” were part of the insurgency and therefore “terrorists.”On Aug. 27, about 80 troops from Myanmar’s 33rd Light Infantry Division arrived in Inn Din, nine Buddhist villagers said. Two paramilitary police officers and Soe Chay, the retired soldier, said the troops belonged to the 11th infantry regiment of this division. The army officer in charge told villagers they must cook for the soldiers and act as lookouts at night, Soe Chay said. The officer promised his troops would protect Buddhist villagers from their Rohingya neighbors. Five Buddhist villagers said the officer told them they could volunteer to join security operations. Young volunteers would need their parents’ permission to join the troops, however.DETAINED: Reuters journalists Wa Lone (foreground) and Kyaw Soe Oo were arrested on Dec. 12 for allegedly obtaining confidential documents related to Rakhine. Here they are seen arriving for a court hearing in Yangon earlier this month.The army found willing participants among Inn Din’s Buddhist “security group,” nine members of the organization and two other villagers said. This informal militia was formed after violence broke out in 2012 between Rakhine’s Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims, sparked by reports of the rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men. Myanmar media reported at the time that the three were sentenced to death by a district court.Inn Din’s security group built watch huts around the Buddhist part of the village, and its members took turns to stand guard. Its ranks included Buddhist firefighters, school teachers, students and unemployed young men. They were useful to the military because they knew the local geography, said Inn Din’s Buddhist administrator, Maung Thein Chay.Most of the group’s 80 to 100 men armed themselves with machetes and sticks. They also had a handful of guns, according to one member. Some wore green fatigue-style clothing they called “militia suits.”In the days that followed the 33rd Light Infantry’s arrival, soldiers, police and Buddhist villagers burned most of the homes of Inn Din’s Rohingya Muslims, a dozen Buddhist residents said.Two of the paramilitary police officers, both members of the 8th Security Police Battalion, said their battalion raided Rohingya hamlets with soldiers from the newly arrived 33rd Light Infantry. One of the police officers said he received verbal orders from his commander to “go and clear” areas where Rohingya lived, which he took to mean to burn them.The second police officer described taking part in several raids on villages north of Inn Din. The raids involved at least 20 soldiers and between five and seven police, he said. A military captain or major led the soldiers, while a police captain oversaw the police team. The purpose of the raids was to deter the Rohingya from returning.“If they have a place to live, if they have food to eat, they can carry out more attacks,” he said. “That’s why we burned their houses, mainly for security reasons.”AFTERMATH: Reuters obtained this picture of the slain Rohingya men from a Buddhist elder. The image is deliberately blurred here; click on the arrow to view at full resolution. Reuters shared the photo with Luis Fondebrider, a forensic anthropologist. He said injuries on two of the bodies were consistent with “the action of a machete or something sharp.”“I want to be transparent on this case. I don’t want it to happen like that in the future.”A Rakhine Buddhist elder, explaining why he chose to speak to Reuters about the killingsSoldiers and paramilitary police wore civilian shirts and shorts to blend in with the villagers, according to the second police officer and Inn Din’s Buddhist administrator, Maung Thein Chay. If the media identified the involvement of security personnel, the police officer explained, “we would have very big problems.”A police spokesman, Colonel Myo Thu Soe, said he knew of no instances of security forces torching villages or wearing civilian clothing. Nor was there any order to “go and clear” or “set fire” to villages. “This is very much impossible,” he told Reuters. “If there are things like that, it should be reported officially, and it has to be investigated officially.”“As you’ve told me about these matters now, we will scrutinize and check back,” he added. “What I want to say for now is that as for the security forces, there are orders and instructions and step-by-step management, and they have to follow them. So, I don’t think these things happened.”The army did not respond to a request for comment.A medical assistant at the Inn Din village clinic, Aung Myat Tun, 20, said he took part in several raids. “Muslim houses were easy to burn because of the thatched roofs. You just light the edge of the roof,” he said. “The village elders put monks’ robes on the end of sticks to make the torches and soaked them with kerosene. We couldn’t bring phones. The police said they will shoot and kill us if they see any of us taking photos.”The night watchman San Thein, a leading member of the village security group, said troops first swept through the Muslim hamlets. Then, he said, the military sent in Buddhist villagers to burn the houses.“We got the kerosene for free from the village market after the kalars ran away,” he said, using a Burmese slur for people from South Asia.A Rakhine Buddhist youth said he thought he heard the sound of a child inside one Rohingya home that was burned. A second villager said he participated in burning a Rohingya home that was occupied.Soe Chay, the retired soldier who was to dig the grave for the 10 Rohingya men, said he participated in one killing. He told Reuters that troops discovered three Rohingya men and a woman hiding beside a haystack in Inn Din on Aug. 28. One of the men had a smartphone that could be used to take incriminating pictures.The soldiers told Soe Chay to “do whatever you want to them,” he said. They pointed out the man with the phone and told him to stand up. “I started hacking him with a sword, and a soldier shot him when he fell down.”Similar violence was playing out across a large part of northern Rakhine, dozens of Buddhist and Rohingya residents said.Data from the U.N. Operational Satellite Applications Programme shows scores of Rohingya villages in Rakhine state burned in an area stretching 110 km. New York-based Human Rights Watch says more than 350 villages were torched over the three months from Aug. 25, according to an analysis of satellite imagery.In the village of Laungdon, some 65 km north of Inn Din, Thar Nge, 38, said he was asked by police and local officials to join a Buddhist security group. “The army invited us to burn the kalar village at Hpaw Ti Kaung,” he said, adding that four villagers and nearly 20 soldiers and police were involved in the operation. “Police shot inside the village so all the villagers fled and then we set fire to it. Their village was burned because police believed the villagers supported Rohingya militants – that’s why they cleaned it with fire.”A Buddhist student from Ta Man Tha village, 15 km north of Laungdon, said he too participated in the burning of Rohingya homes. An army officer sought 30 volunteers to burn “kalar” villages, said the student. Nearly 50 volunteered and gathered fuel from motorbikes and from a market.“They separated us into several groups. We were not allowed to enter the village directly. We had to surround it and approach the village that way. The army would shoot gunfire ahead of us and then the army asked us to enter,” he said.“Muslim houses were easy to burn because of the thatched roofs. You just light the edge of the roof.”Buddhist villager Aung Myat TunAfter the Rohingya had fled Inn Din, Buddhist villagers took their property, including chickens and goats, Buddhist residents told Reuters. But the most valuable goods, mostly motorcycles and cattle, were collected by members of the 8th Security Police Battalion and sold, said the first police officer and Inn Din village administrator Maung Thein Chay. Maung Thein Chay said the commander of the 8th Battalion, Thant Zin Oo, struck a deal with Buddhist businessmen from other parts of Rakhine state and sold them cattle. The police officer said he had stolen four cows from Rohingya villagers, only for Thant Zin Oo to snatch them away.Reached by phone, Thant Zin Oo did not comment. Colonel Myo Thu Soe, the police spokesman, said the police would investigate the allegations of looting.By Sept. 1, several hundred Rohingya from Inn Din were sheltering at a makeshift camp on a nearby beach. They erected tarpaulin shelters to shield themselves from heavy rain.Among this group were the 10 Rohingya men who would be killed the next morning. Reuters has identified all of the 10 by speaking to witnesses among Inn Din’s Buddhist community and Rohingya relatives and witnesses tracked down in refugee camps in Bangladesh.Five of the men, Dil Mohammed, 35, Nur Mohammed, 29, Shoket Ullah, 35, Habizu, 40, and Shaker Ahmed, 45, were fishermen or fish sellers. The wealthiest of the group, Abul Hashim, 25, ran a store selling nets and machine parts to fishermen and farmers. Abdul Majid, a 45-year-old father of eight, ran a small shop selling areca nut wrapped in betel leaves, commonly chewed like tobacco. Abulu, 17, and Rashid Ahmed, 18, were high school students. Abdul Malik, 30, was an Islamic teacher.According to the statement released by the army on Jan. 10, security forces had gone to a coastal area where they “were attacked by about 200 Bengalis with sticks and swords.” The statement said that “as the security forces opened fire into the sky, the Bengalis dispersed and ran away. Ten of them were arrested.”Three Buddhist and more than a dozen Rohingya witnesses contradict this version of events. Their accounts differ from one another in some details. The Buddhists spoke of a confrontation between a small group of Rohingya men and some soldiers near the beach. But there is unanimity on a crucial point: None said the military had come under a large-scale attack in Inn Din.Government spokesman Zaw Htay referred Reuters to the army’s statement of Jan. 10 and declined to elaborate further. The army did not respond to a request for comment.The Rohingya witnesses, who were on or near the beach, said Islamic teacher Abdul Malik had gone back to his hamlet with his sons to collect food and bamboo for shelter. When he returned, a group of at least seven soldiers and armed Buddhist villagers were following him, these witnesses said. Abdul Malik walked towards the watching Rohingya Muslims unsteadily, with blood dripping from his head. Some witnesses said they had seen one of the armed men strike the back of Abdul Malik’s head with a knife.Then the military beckoned with their guns to the crowd of roughly 300 Rohingya to assemble in the paddies, these witnesses said. The soldiers and the Rohingya, hailing from different parts of Myanmar, spoke different languages. Educated villagers translated for their fellow Rohingya.“I could not hear much, but they pointed toward my husband and some other men to get up and come forward,” said Rehana Khatun, 22, the wife of Nur Mohammed, one of the 10 who were later slain. “We heard they wanted the men for a meeting. The military asked the rest of us to return to the beach.”Soldiers held and questioned the 10 men in a building at Inn Din’s school for a night, the military said. Rashid Ahmed and Abulu had studied there alongside Rakhine Buddhist students until the attacks by Rohingya rebels in October 2016. Schools were shut temporarily, disrupting the pair’s final year.“I just remember him sitting there and studying, and it was always amazing to me because I am not educated,” said Rashid Ahmed’s father, farmer Abdu Shakur, 50. “I would look at him reading. He would be the first one in the family to be educated.”A photograph, taken on the evening the men were detained, shows the two Rohingya students and the eight older men kneeling on a path beside the village clinic, most of them shirtless. They were stripped when first detained, a dozen Rohingya witnesses said. It isn’t clear why. That evening, Buddhist villagers said, the men were “treated” to a last meal of beef. They were provided with fresh clothing.On Sept. 2, the men were taken to scrubland north of the village, near a graveyard for Buddhist residents, six Buddhist villagers said. The spot is backed by a hill crested with trees. There, on their knees, the 10 were photographed again and questioned by security personnel about the disappearance of a local Buddhist farmer named Maung Ni, according to a Rakhine elder who said he witnessed the interrogation.Reuters was not able to establish what happened to Maung Ni. According to Buddhist neighbors, the farmer went missing after leaving home early on Aug. 25 to tend his cattle. Several Rakhine Buddhist and Rohingya villagers told Reuters they believed he had been killed, but they knew of no evidence connecting any of the 10 men to his disappearance. The army said in its Jan. 10 statement that “Bengali terrorists” had killed Maung Ni, but did not identify the perpetrators.Two of the men pictured behind the Rohingya prisoners in the photograph taken on the morning of Sept. 2 belong to the 8th Security Police Battalion. Reuters confirmed the identities of the two men from their Facebook pages and by visiting them in person.One of the two officers, Aung Min, a police recruit from Yangon, stands directly behind the captives. He looks at the camera as he holds a weapon. The other officer, police Captain Moe Yan Naing, is the figure on the top right. He walks with his rifle over his shoulder.The day after the two Reuters reporters were arrested in December, Myanmar’s government also announced that Moe Yan Naing had been arrested and was being investigated under the 1923 Official Secrets Act.Aung Min, who is not facing legal action, declined to speak to Reuters.Three Buddhist youths said they watched from a hut as the 10 Rohingya captives were led up a hill by soldiers towards the site of their deaths.One of the gravediggers, retired soldier Soe Chay, said Maung Ni’s sons were invited by the army officer in charge of the squad to strike the first blows.The first son beheaded the Islamic teacher, Abdul Malik, according to Soe Chay. The second son hacked another of the men in the neck.REUTERS INVESTIGATESMore Reuters investigations and long-form narrativesGot a confidential news tip? Reuters Investigates offers several ways to securely contact our reporters“After the brothers sliced them both with swords, the squad fired with guns. Two to three shots to one person,” said Soe Chay. A second gravedigger, who declined to be identified, confirmed that soldiers had shot some of the men.In its Jan. 10 statement, the military said the two brothers and a third villager had “cut the Bengali terrorists” with swords and then, in the chaos, four members of the security forces had shot the captives. “Action will be taken against the villagers who participated in the case and the members of security forces who broke the Rules of Engagement under the law,” the statement said. It didn’t spell out those rules.Tun Aye, one of the sons of Maung Ni, has been detained on murder charges, his lawyer said on Jan. 13. Contacted by Reuters on Feb. 8, the lawyer declined to comment further. Reuters was unable to reach the other brother.In October, Inn Din locals pointed two Reuters reporters towards an area of brush behind the hill where they said the killings took place. The reporters discovered a newly cut trail leading to soft, recently disturbed earth littered with bones. Some of the bones were entangled with scraps of clothing and string that appeared to match the cord that is seen binding the captives’ wrists in the photographs. The immediate area was marked by the smell of death.Reuters showed photographs of the site to three forensic experts: Homer Venters, director of programs at Physicians for Human Rights; Derrick Pounder, a pathologist who has consulted for Amnesty International and the United Nations; and Luis Fondebrider, president of the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team, who investigated the graves of those killed under Argentina’s military junta in the 1970s and 1980s. All observed human remains, including the thoracic part of a spinal column, ribs, scapula, femur and tibia. Pounder said he couldn’t rule out the presence of animal bones as well.The Rakhine Buddhist elder provided Reuters reporters with a photograph which shows the aftermath of the execution. In it, the 10 Rohingya men are wearing the same clothing as in the previous photo and are tied to each other with the same yellow cord, piled into a small hole in the earth, blood pooling around them. Abdul Malik, the Islamic teacher, appears to have been beheaded. Abulu, the student, has a gaping wound in his neck. Both injuries appear consistent with Soe Chay’s account.Fondebrider reviewed this picture. He said injuries visible on two of the bodies were consistent with “the action of a machete or something sharp that was applied on the throat.”Some family members did not know for sure that the men had been killed until Reuters returned to their shelters in Bangladesh in January.“I can’t explain what I feel inside. My husband is dead,” said Rehana Khatun, wife of Nur Mohammed. “My husband is gone forever. I don’t want anything else, but I want justice for his death.”In Inn Din, the Buddhist elder explained why he chose to share evidence of the killings with Reuters. “I want to be transparent on this case. I don’t want it to happen like that in future.”last_img read more