Category: dmkmwylitkhy

Shiv Sena may get deputy speaker’s post in Assembly

Shiv Sena may get deputy speaker’s post in Assembly

first_imgDespite the announcement of contesting the forthcoming general elections independently, the Shiv Sena is likely to accept the post of deputy speaker in the State Assembly, indicating both parties are patching up their differences. The move is seen as an attempt by the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) to soften its ally who has taken an aggressive stand over the issue of Ram temple in Ayodhya. Four years after the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)-led government took the reins of power, the State Assembly may have a deputy speaker in the form of Sena member of the Legislative Assembly Vijay Auti. Assembly speaker Haribhau Bagde made the announcement of the election programme for the post on Wednesday. As per the schedule, the election, if required, will be held on the last day of the winter session of the State legislature that falls on November 30. On Tuesday night, Revenue Minister Chandrakant Patil held a meeting with Sena chief Uddhav Thackeray to discuss the Maratha reservation issue. However the issue of the deputy speaker’s post in the Assembly and deputy chairman’s post in the State Council was also discussed. Sources said the BJP may also extend the post of deputy chairman in the Council to the Sena. According to sources in the Sena, Mr. Auti is likely to file nomination and will be elected unopposed. A senior leader of the Nationalist Congress Party said fighting for this post makes no sense for the Opposition as it does not have the numbers. “Why should we spend our energy fighting this battle? Barely seven months are left for the State Assembly polls to be announced. Let the BJP give this post to the Sena. It will also expose how both the parties are together, even though they are claiming otherwise,” he said. A Sena leader said although no name has been finalised, the decision would be taken by the party chief. He accepted that at a time when his party is aggressively criticising the BJP over the issue of Ram temple in Ayodhya, the move may send the wrong signals. “There is no reason to reject the offer if the post is offered to us. What will happen in the election is a different story altogether,” said the leader.last_img read more

Darwin’s ship library goes online

Darwin’s ship library goes online

first_imgAs Charles Darwin cruised the world on the HMS Beagle, he had access to an unusually well-stocked 400-volume library. That collection, which contained the observations of numerous other naturalists and explorers, has now been recreated online. As of today, all of more than 195,000 pages and 5000 illustrations from the works are available for the perusal of scholars and armchair naturalists alike, thanks to the Darwin Online project. The Beagle’s library included such influential reference texts as Charles Lyell’s Principles of Geology, as well as the writings of James Cook, Alexander von Humboldt, and Thomas Pennant (from whose 1793 book, History of Quadrupeds, this picture of a camel is taken). Atlases and books on travel, natural history, and geology made up most of the collection. But it had a few works of literature as well, including John Milton’s Paradise Lost. The Beagle library was dispersed when the voyage ended in October 1836. Scholars had previously identified 132 works as probably in the library based on Darwin’s writings. Science historian John van Wyhe, of the National University of Singapore, identified additional likely volumes by scouring Darwin’s field notebooks and the writings of other crew members for hints. The entire library—181 works in 404 volumes—includes works with illustrations digitized for the first time.last_img read more

Indian-Origin Family Attacks UK Celebrity For Drink-Driving Crash

Indian-Origin Family Attacks UK Celebrity For Drink-Driving Crash

first_imgAn Indian-origin family, involved in a car accident with a popular British celebrity, said today the TV star who was later arrested for drink-driving never came out of his vehicle and did not apologise for crashing into them.London-based restaurant owner Faheem Vanoo was at the wheel of his car with his wife Shilpa Dandekar and four-year-old daughter Amaira and two colleagues when television personality Ant McPartlin crashed into them.Read it at NDTV Related Itemslast_img

VOTE ON GUNS & SECURITY IN WOODBURY COURT BUILDINGS DELAYED A…

VOTE ON GUNS & SECURITY IN WOODBURY COURT BUILDINGS DELAYED A…

first_imgWOODBURY COUNTY SUPERVISORS WERE UNABLE TO TAKE ACTION ON OPTIONS TO FUND EXPANDED SECURITY IN THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, THE TROSPER-HOYT BUILDING AND THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CENTER AT THEIR TUESDAY MEETING.SHERIFF DAVE DREW ASKED THE SUPERVISORS TO RESCIND THEIR REQUEST TO ALLOW GUNS IN NON-COURT AREAS OF THOSE BUILDINGS OR TO FUND SCREENING COSTS BETWEEN $560-THOUSAND TO OVER $945-THOUSAND DOLLARS.Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/BAN.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC….LAW ENFORCEMENT CENTER. :14JUDGE DUANE HOFFMEYER ALSO TOLD SUPERVISORS THAT HE COULD ISSUE A NEW ORDER REINSTATING A WEAPONS BAN IF THEY REQUESTED IT:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/BAN2.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC………WHICH I HONORED. ;14CHAIRMAN ROCKY DEWITT THEN PROPOSED TO MAKE A MOTION TO REINSTATE THE WEAPONS BAN:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/BAN4.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC……..$900,000. :21BUT THE PLAN HIT A SNAG WHEN COUNTY ATTORNEY PATRICK JENNINGS TOLD SUPERVISORS THEY COULD NOT VOTE ON A MOTION BY CHAIRMAN ROCKY DEWITT TO RESCIND THE ORDER ALLOWING WEAPONS UNTIL NEXT TUESDAY, IN PART BECAUSE THE ITEM WAS ON THE AGENDA AS A BUDGET ITEM:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/BAN3.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC……CORRECT. ;11FEBRUARY 20TH IS THE DEADLINE SUPERVISORS HAVE TO FINALIZE THEIR BUDGET BEFORE A PUBLIC HEARING.THE ISSUE HAS ARISEN BECAUSE A MAJORITY OF SUPERVISORS HAVE PREVIOUSLY PUSHED OPENING THE COURTHOUSE TO ALLOW CITIZENS TO BRING GUNS INTO THE BUILDING IF THEY HAVE A CONCEAL/CARRY PERMIT, BASED ON AN ORDER FROM THE IOWA SUPREME COURT CHIEF JUSTICE.last_img read more

Recruit on the Radar: Meet Chanse Sylvie

Recruit on the Radar: Meet Chanse Sylvie

first_imgIf you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers! Chanse Sylvie is a 6-foot, 180 pound safety from Louisiana’s talent rich Calvary Baptist Academy. Sylvie has been pursued by the Pokes for awhile now, and his teammate, Rodarius Williams, has been committed to Oklahoma State since April.The good news for the Pokes is that it appears they have an inside connection. J.J. McCleskey, who is the father of recent OSU wide receiver signee Jalen McCleskey, coached the Louisiana Bootleggers 7-on-7 national championships over the weekend.McCleskey had nothing but good things to say about Sylvie. “This kid can play,” McCleskey told 247sports. “He is a leader and made all the calls and adjustments we asked him to make. He has great range and his footwork is already good. He’s a guy who is going to be even better in pads, but he was really good for us.”Consider that high praise from the former NFL player who now trains players at the high school, college and pro level.It’s worth noting that McCleskey recently helped bring recent commit Devin Harper aboard. Can’t blame him for wanting his son to be surrounded with talent in Stillwater, but if his connection with Sylvie plays a factor in his decision then Gundy may need to start paying for McCleskey’s Louisiana connections.last_img read more

Video: New York Knicks Fans Wildly Boo Pick Of Kristaps Porzingis

Video: New York Knicks Fans Wildly Boo Pick Of Kristaps Porzingis

first_imgkristaps porzings during a game with the knicksPHOENIX, AZ – JANUARY 26: Kristaps Porzingis #6 of the New York Knicks during the NBA game against the Phoenix Suns at Talking Stick Resort Arena on January 26, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)New York Knicks fans are not happy. The franchise, unfortunately slotted with the fourth pick (despite having the second-worst record in the league) in this year’s NBA Draft, chose Latvian center Kristaps Porzingis over former college stars like Justise Winslow, Frank Kaminsky and Stanley Johnson. The decision, which certainly may not turn out to be the wrong one in the long run, was met with a chorus of boos at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. One young fan was beside himself when he heard the news.Porzingis is just 19, so he may need a year or two to develop into a quality NBA player. It doesn’t look like Knicks fans are going to be patient heading into it all.last_img read more

When work pressure turns deadly

When work pressure turns deadly

first_imgFrom opening a store in 1996 to having 1,752 stores in the present time, success of VG Siddhartha’s premium coffee brand, Café Coffee Day, has been an enviable journey. Being the founder, Siddhartha had to deal with a lot of work pressure which further led him into depression. The effect was so severe that he decided to end his life – leaving behind a note stating himself as a ‘failed entrepreneur’.The news of his suicide and the dead body found on the bank of a river, left everyone in a whammy. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainSuch incidences, where many artists, celebrities, and top-notch businessmen ended their lives because of increased pressure, have become very frequent in the past few years, and as per World Health Organization, workplace stress is the most dangerous form of stress. It is the response people may have when presented with work demand and pressure. Basically, any issue in the workplace can affect a person’s wellbeing, and that is what leads to mental health problems like anxiety, depression and sometimes suicide. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma AwardThus, to understand the reasons of such actions, to know what might have gone wrong, and what can we do to make it right, Millennium Post talked to various experts in Mental Health sector. According to Dr. Aditi Govitrikar, Psychologist, just like success and failure are the reason for happiness and sadness, respectively, they affect one’s mental health too. “There are certain kinds of disorders which are common to the entrepreneurs, or bold people who have made very risky decisions in life and achieved success. The most common disorder with Type A personalities and entrepreneurs is Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder, which is also called Super Achievers’ Disease. Then there is, of course, depression that an entrepreneur faces when he goes through the down-phase of his business because they can’t show vulnerability,” she explains. According to a recent national mental health survey, over 150 million people in India are in need of serious mental health care interventions. Despite the fact that a large percent of our population suffers from some form of mental illness, mental health issues are considered a social taboo in our country and remain largely ignored. Talking about the same, Dr Shweta Sharma, Clinical Psychologist, Columbia Asia Gurgaon, says, “Our culture is such that a person juggles multiple relationships – social, familial, professional. He/ she has to deal with immense expectations and criticism, and that just increase the stress levels.” A study of 1990-2016 published in The Lancet indicates that India accounts for 37% of suicides in women and 24% of suicides in men. Individual 15-39 years old account for the largest number of suicides in India. There has been a 40% increase in suicides in india between 1990 and 2016. Addressing the issue of increasing suicide rate, Kamna Chhibber, Clinical Psychologist, HOD, Mental Health and Behavioral Sciences, Fortis Healthcare, states that the reasons for someone to think of suicide can be many. It is usually not a decision taken in a moment. The individual typically does not see a solution to their problems, struggles to share and express what is happening which can prompt him to take such a step.” It is important to know that 90% of those who commit suicide had an undiagnosed mental health illness and 70% of these had an undiagnosed depression. Dr Prakriti Poddar, expert in Mental Health, HR, Corporate and Education upliftment, Managing Trustee of the Poddar Foundation feels that creating awareness, sensitising people to understand clinical conditions, and accept them is very important. Simultaneously it is essential to reach out for help – making them comfortable to talk to the close ones, reaching out to experts in extreme cases, or calling helplines if needed.last_img read more

Court asked to give interim payment to victims of Humboldt crash

Court asked to give interim payment to victims of Humboldt crash

first_imgSASKATOON – A court hearing has been rescheduled for Aug. 15 to provide victims of the Humboldt Broncos bus crash with $50,000 each from a massive fundraising campaign.The Humboldt Broncos Memorial Fund Inc. will ask the Saskatchewan Court of Queen’s Bench to approve the interim payment to the 13 survivors and the families of the 16 people who died in the crash on April 6.The fund says some of the families affiliated with the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League team are in urgent need of money.A GoFundMe campaign was created immediately after the crash and received $15.2 million in donations from all over the world.The hearing, which was initially set for Aug. 13, will also establish a committee to determine how the rest of the money will be distributed.It’s expected to go to victims in the coming months.last_img read more

UN relief agency hails Australias decision to bring back refugees sent to

UN relief agency hails Australias decision to bring back refugees sent to

All but two of the 27 individuals concerned will go to Australia, and 13 of them will be granted asylum, according to UNHCR. The remaining dozen will be brought to Australia, where some will initially be “based in detention” while their long-term disposition is settled,” agency spokesman Ron Redmond said in Geneva.”Given the need to avoid further exacerbating reported mental health problems, UNHCR has urged the Australian Government to expedite any security clearance processes and to ensure that people being brought from Nauru will not need to be detained after arriving in Australia,” he said.Although the asylum seekers were not treated badly on Nauru, they endured prolonged isolation at the Offshore Processing Centre there, and another long-term detention could further exacerbate their reported mental health problems.Of the 13 men who have been granted asylum, eight are Afghans, and five are Iraqis. Among those who were not approved were eight Iraqis, two Bangladeshi, one Iranian and one Pakistani.Many refugees arrived to Australia by boat in 1999, and overwhelmed by the upsurge in people seeking asylum, the Australian Government sent some of them to Nauru or Papua New Guinea’s Manus Island. read more

World making slow progress toward ensuring safe blood supply UN health agency

World making slow progress toward ensuring safe blood supply UN health agency

However, some countries such as China, Malaysia and India have shown progress in the last two years by applying stricter principles to blood donation within their AIDS prevention programmes, the WHO said today ahead of the full survey results to be published on World Blood Donor Day on Wednesday.Regular, unpaid voluntary donors are the mainstay of a safe and sustainable blood supply because they are less likely to lie about their health status, WHO said. Evidence indicates that they are also more likely to keep themselves healthy. South Africa, for instance, has an HIV prevalence of 23.3 per cent in the adult population but only 0.03 per cent among its regular blood donors. The survey shows that out of the 124 countries that provided data to the WHO, 56 saw an increase in unpaid voluntary donations. The remaining 68 have either made no progress or have seen a decline in the number of unpaid voluntary donors. Of the 124 countries, 49 have reached 100 per cent unpaid voluntary blood donations but out of these 49, only 17 are developing countries. “The number of donations per 1000 population is about 15 times greater in high-income than in low-income countries,” WHO said in today’s release. “This is concerning because developing countries have an even greater need for sustained supplies of safe blood since many conditions requiring blood transfusions – such as severe malaria-related anaemia in children or serious pregnancy complications – are still claiming over one million lives every year.”In the area of blood testing, 56 out of 124 countries did not screen all of their donated blood for HIV, hepatitis B and C and syphilis and the reasons given for this include scarcity or unaffordability of test kits, lack of infrastructure and shortage of trained staff. However despite such poor findings, WHO said the survey did show some signs of progress. In particular, St. Lucia has made the biggest jump forward, going from 24.39 per cent of collected blood coming from unpaid volunteers in 2002 to just over 83 per cent in 2004, while Malaysia went from 50 per cent to 99 per cent and India from 45 per cent to 52.42 per cent.According to Government responses to the WHO questionnaire, the reason for progress is tied to stronger AIDS prevention programmes. In China , government figures show that all donated blood in 2005 was tested for the four infections, while in the area of blood donation, China has seen a rise of unpaid voluntary donors from 22 per cent in 1998 to 94.5 per cent last year. Much of China’s progress is due to its reduction of commercial blood and plasma, thus minimizing the practice of unregulated blood collection and provision throughout the country while also strengthening HIV prevention. The WHO introduced the 100 per cent unpaid, voluntary blood donation policy in 1997. World Blood Donor Day, an annual event on June 14, is a day to help governments reach that target by creating awareness of the need for sustainable supplies of safe blood. It is also a day to thank existing blood donors for the remarkable gift they make to those whose lives they have improved or saved, and to encourage new donors to commit. “Commitment” is the theme of this year’s World Blood Donor Day – commitment from regular and potential donors, but also from Governments and the global community, with the goal of keeping blood safety high on the agenda as a vital factor in treatment and disease prevention. The global observance of World Blood Donor Day this year will take place in Bangkok, Thailand. read more

iFixit awards Microsoft Surface Pro lowest repairability score Ever

iFixit awards Microsoft Surface Pro lowest repairability score Ever

first_imgWhile ease of self repair may not be a big feature in the eyes of most consumers today, there is a mountain of differencec between being difficult to repair and being near impossible. Today, iFixit sat the Microsoft Surface Pro on a shelf right next to the Retina MacBook Pro as the least repairable computers they have ever opened up.Microsoft is no stranger to designing and selling hardware, after years of revising the Xbox 360 and their own line of keyboards, mice, and cameras. The Surface line is their first foray into full computers, and on the outside they have an impressive machine. Their VaporMg casing feels good in the hand, and during their own tests they said the equipment was designed to survive more than a few rough drops. While some may cringe at the thought of a $1,000 tablet PC hitting the ground, those who have thumbed through the iFixit teardown of the Surface Pro will cringe at what it takes to repair this beast.In order to accomplish anything at all, from replacing the SSD, fixing a fan, to replacing the screen, you’ll have to battle with what can only be described as an unhealthy amount of glue. Just getting under the screen for anything will require significant application of heat and a very careful hand. If you’re lucky enough to get the screen off without damaging anything, you’re going to have to remove more than a handful of the 90 screws that keep Microsoft’s tablet PC together.If you’re trying to get to the battery, which iFixit admits is of impressive quality, you’re looking at even more glue and a warning not to try and remove it. Considering that battery life is one of the chief complaints with the Surface Pro, it looks like the only way you’re getting more battery is to hope Microsoft releases an accessory to take advantage of the extra pins on the bottom of this version of the Surface. Provided you find your way to what you are looking for and complete your objective, you’ll need to heat everything back up to get the screen back in place and pray you never need to open this thing again.iFixit gave the Surface Pro a 1 out of 10, which is the lowest possible score they could give the tablet. The only other machine in recent memory to earn this incredibly low rating is Apple’s Retina MacBook Best Price at Amazon , which also had an absurd amount of glue holding things together.If there was a lower bar for iFixit to put the Surface Pro on, there’s a good change that’s where it would be. For those who have already purchased a Surface Pro, or are interested in purchasing one in the future, it’s probably a good idea to take advantage of Microsoft’s AppleCare-style warranty. You’ll be able to take your Surface Pro into a Microsoft Store and have it serviced by their staff, or just replaced outright if necessary. At the very least, you’ll be able to get a replacement if you try to follow iFixit’s instructions and fail.last_img read more

China Punishes Inconsiderate Drivers By Making Them Stare Into High Beams

China Punishes Inconsiderate Drivers By Making Them Stare Into High Beams

first_img Keto Turns Your Smartphone Into Your Car KeysAston Martin Will Build You Your Very Own Supervillain Lair Stay on target It’s late at night. You’re driving on an empty road with your high beams on when suddenly there’s a vehicle coming the other way. You dim yours, but the other driver never returns the favor.You flash your brights, but there’s still no acknowledgment. As the car cruises past you mutter something about inconsiderate jerks to yourself and keep on driving while your eyes try to re-adjust. Someone really should teach that guy a lesson about courtesy, you figure.The police in China hear you loud and clear. They find inconsiderate high beam users to be not only a nuisance but a major safety risk, too. That’s why they’ve started cracking down, and they’re making sure that the punishment fits the crime.They’re sitting offending drivers in front of their vehicles and making them stare into the lights (on high) for a full minute. Ok, maybe that doesn’t totally fit the crime — most of us have probably never had to deal with a blast of bright that prolonged — but they probably figured that a few seconds wouldn’t really drive home the point.In just over two hours, Shenzen police stopped over 900 offenders. They shared images of the punishment being dished out on their official Weibo account, and it’s pretty clear that a lot of people in China think that this creative take on highway justice is welcome. One of the posts has been liked and shared more than 170,000 times.An interesting note about the “beamings” that were done: they were all voluntary. Xinhua, China’s state-run news agency, stated that the headlight part of the punishment wasn’t mandatory. The $45 fine was, however.Image via weibo.com/shenzhenjiaojinglast_img read more

Neville Mourinho looks tired and fed up

Neville Mourinho looks tired and fed up

first_imgSky Sports pundit Gary Neville thinks Jose Mourinho is clearly fed up and tired considering his recent short press conference that lasted three minutes.The Red Devils are on a four-game winless run and currently occupy 10th position in the Premier League table after last weekend’s 3-1 defeat to West Ham.However, the Portuguese manager admitted his team’s levels have not been good enough ahead of what he dubbed a tough clash against Newcastle United at Old Trafford.“I have to say he looked fed up,” Neville said on Friday Night Football, before explaining constant media focus can take its toll on managers. “Obviously it’s not been a pleasant few weeks.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.“But we’ve seen over the last five or six years being on television here, sometimes you see managers who have had that run of bad results and you can see they’re aware of fatigue, of coming into press conferences.“I experienced it at Valencia in that last couple of months. Jose Mourinho has had seven matches in the last 18 to 20 days, he does a press conference pre-match and a press conference post-match, so 14 times he’s got to sit in that room and answer those questions when his team aren’t playing well, when his team aren’t getting the results.“He just looks worn to me. Looking at that footage, he looks tired. It’s sad to see actually, it’s not great to see.”last_img read more

2 juveniles arrested in Lauderdale Lakes home burglary

2 juveniles arrested in Lauderdale Lakes home burglary

first_imgLAUDERDALE LAKES, FLA. (WSVN) – Authorities have arrested two male juveniles in connection to an armed occupied burglary at a home in Lauderdale Lakes.7Skyforce HD hovered above the scene near Northwest 36th Terrace and 32nd Street, as a SWAT unit surrounded the residence, Thursday morning.According to the Broward Sheriff’s Office, the SWAT unit was called in to clear the house because they believed there was a third subject, but that did not turn out to be the case.No shots were fired, and no one was injured.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Nerkonda Paarvai first single Here is Vaanil Irul song from Ajiths film

Nerkonda Paarvai first single Here is Vaanil Irul song from Ajiths film

first_imgAjith Kumar in Nerkonda Paarvai.PR HandoutThe makers of Nerkonda Paarvai have surprised the fans of Ajith again. After the trailer, they have released the first single from the actor’s upcoming movie on Thursday, 27 June, without much hype. [Crawl down to listen to the song]It is a melodious song with a lot of intensity composed by Yuvan Shankar Raja. Dhee has sung the track for which Umadevi has penned the lyrics. The track has a good emotional impact with some fantastic lines.Dhee’s voice syncs well with the lyrics and the tune. After superhit ‘Rowdy Baby’ song, the singer is set to register a hit track to her credit again. It has already started gaining a lot of positive words on social media site and select-few responses can be ready below:Kaushik LM: #VaanilIrul from #Thala #Ajith’s #NerKondaPaarvai – intense, serious and story driven. The trademark voice of Dhee adds to the depth of the song..Ramesh Bala: A Fantastic Melody with lot of intensity.. Repeat-worthy song.. Beautiful singing by #Dhee Meaningful lyrics by #Umadevi – A Winner! #NerKondaPaarvaiFirstSingle #NerKondaPaarvaiMelodyTreat #VaanilIrulNerkonda Paarvai is about three girls, falsely accused of prostitution and murder attempt, fighting for justice with the support of a lawyer played by Amitabh Bachchan in the original.In Nerkonda Paarvai, the actor, who is known as Thala to his fans, will be the defense lawyer. H Vinoth-directorial movie has Vidya Balan playing Thala’s wife, while Shraddha Srinath, Andrea Tariang and Abhirami Venkatachalam are in the important roles. Delhi Ganesh, Arjun Chidambaram, Ashwin Rao and others are in the cast.last_img read more

Massacre in Myanmar

Massacre in Myanmar

first_imgThis photo was taken on the day the 10 Rohingya men were killed. Paramilitary police officer Aung Min, left, stands guard behind them. The picture was obtained from a Buddhist village elder, and authenticated by witnesses. Photo: Reuters Bound together, the 10 Rohingya Muslim captives watched their Buddhist neighbors dig a shallow grave. Soon afterwards, on the morning of 2 September 2, all 10 lay dead. At least two were hacked to death by Buddhist villagers. The rest were shot by Myanmar troops, two of the gravediggers said.“One grave for 10 people,” said Soe Chay, 55, a retired soldier from Inn Din’s Rakhine Buddhist community who said he helped dig the pit and saw the killings. The soldiers shot each man two or three times, he said. “When they were being buried, some were still making noises. Others were already dead.”The killings in the coastal village of Inn Din marked another bloody episode in the ethnic violence sweeping northern Rakhine state, on Myanmar’s western fringe. Nearly 690,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled their villages and crossed the border into Bangladesh since August. None of Inn Din’s 6,000 Rohingya remained in the village as of October.The Rohingya accuse the army of arson, rapes and killings aimed at rubbing them out of existence in this mainly Buddhist nation of 53 million. The United Nations has said the army may have committed genocide; the United States has called the action ethnic cleansing. Myanmar says its “clearance operation” is a legitimate response to attacks by Rohingya insurgents.Rohingya trace their presence in Rakhine back centuries. But most Burmese consider them to be unwanted immigrants from Bangladesh; the army refers to the Rohingya as “Bengalis.” In recent years, sectarian tensions have risen and the government has confined more than 100,000 Rohingya in camps where they have limited access to food, medicine and education.Reuters has pieced together what happened in Inn Din in the days leading up to the killing of the 10 Rohingya – eight men and two high school students in their late teens.Until now, accounts of the violence against the Rohingya in Rakhine state have been provided only by its victims. The Reuters reconstruction draws for the first time on interviews with Buddhist villagers who confessed to torching Rohingya homes, burying bodies and killing Muslims.This account also marks the first time soldiers and paramilitary police have been implicated by testimony from security personnel themselves. Members of the paramilitary police gave Reuters insider descriptions of the operation to drive out the Rohingya from Inn Din, confirming that the military played the lead role in the campaign.The slain men’s families, now sheltering in Bangladesh refugee camps, identified the victims through photographs shown to them by Reuters. The dead men were fishermen, shopkeepers, the two teenage students and an Islamic teacher.Three photographs, provided to Reuters by a Buddhist village elder, capture key moments in the massacre at Inn Din, from the Rohingya men’s detention by soldiers in the early evening of 1 September to their execution shortly after 10 a.m. on 2 Sept. Two photos – one taken the first day, the other on the day of the killings – show the 10 captives lined up in a row, kneeling. The final photograph shows the men’s bloodied bodies piled in the shallow grave.The Reuters investigation of the Inn Din massacre was what prompted Myanmar police authorities to arrest two of the news agency’s reporters. The reporters, Burmese citizens Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, were detained on Dec. 12 for allegedly obtaining confidential documents relating to Rakhine.Then, on Jan. 10, the military issued a statement that confirmed portions of what Wa Lone, Kyaw Soe Oo and their colleagues were preparing to report, acknowledging that 10 Rohingya men were massacred in the village. It confirmed that Buddhist villagers attacked some of the men with swords and soldiers shot the others dead.The statement coincided with an application to the court by prosecutors to charge Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo under Myanmar’s Official Secrets Act, which dates back to the time of colonial British rule. The charges carry a maximum 14-year prison sentence.But the military’s version of events is contradicted in important respects by accounts given to Reuters by Rakhine Buddhist and Rohingya Muslim witnesses. The military said the 10 men belonged to a group of 200 “terrorists” that attacked security forces. Soldiers decided to kill the men, the army said, because intense fighting in the area made it impossible to transfer them to police custody. The army said it would take action against those involved.Buddhist villagers interviewed for this article reported no attack by a large number of insurgents on security forces in Inn Din. And Rohingya witnesses told Reuters that soldiers plucked the 10 from among hundreds of men, women and children who had sought safety on a nearby beach.Scores of interviews with Rakhine Buddhist villagers, soldiers, paramilitary police, Rohingya Muslims and local administrators further revealed:• The military and paramilitary police organized Buddhist residents of Inn Din and at least two other villages to torch Rohingya homes, more than a dozen Buddhist villagers said. Eleven Buddhist villagers said Buddhists committed acts of violence, including killings. The government and army have repeatedly blamed Rohingya insurgents for burning villages and homes.• An order to “clear” Inn Din’s Rohingya hamlets was passed down the command chain from the military, said three paramilitary police officers speaking on condition of anonymity and a fourth police officer at an intelligence unit in the regional capital Sittwe. Security forces wore civilian clothes to avoid detection during raids, one of the paramilitary police officers said.• Some members of the paramilitary police looted Rohingya property, including cows and motorcycles, in order to sell it, according to village administrator Maung Thein Chay and one of the paramilitary police officers.• Operations in Inn Din were led by the army’s 33rd Light Infantry Division, supported by the paramilitary 8th Security Police Battalion, according to four police officers, all of them members of the battalion.The killings in Inn DinMichael G. Karnavas, a U.S. lawyer based in The Hague who has worked on cases at international criminal tribunals, said evidence that the military had organized Buddhist civilians to commit violence against Rohingya “would be the closest thing to a smoking gun in establishing not just intent, but even specific genocidal intent, since the attacks seem designed to destroy the Rohingya or at least a significant part of them.”Evidence of the execution of men in government custody also could be used to build a case of crimes against humanity against military commanders, Karnavas said, if it could be shown that it was part of a “widespread or systematic” campaign targeting the Rohingya population. Kevin Jon Heller, a University of London law professor who served as a legal associate for convicted war criminal and former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, said an order to clear villages by military command was “unequivocally the crime against humanity of forcible transfer.”In December, the United States imposed sanctions on the army officer who had been in charge of Western Command troops in Rakhine, Major General Maung Maung Soe. So far, however, Myanmar has not faced international sanctions over the violence. Myanmar’s leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, has disappointed many former supporters in the West by not speaking out against the army’s actions. They had hoped the election of her National League for Democracy party in 2015 would bring democratic reform and an opening of the country. Instead, critics say, Suu Kyi is in thrall to the generals who freed her from house arrest in 2010.Asked about the evidence Reuters has uncovered about the massacre, government spokesman Zaw Htay said, “We are not denying the allegations about violations of human rights. And we are not giving blanket denials.” If there was “strong and reliable primary evidence” of abuses, the government would investigate, he said. “And then if we found the evidence is true and the violations are there, we will take the necessary action according to our existing law.”When told that paramilitary police officers had said they received orders to “clear” Inn Din’s Rohingya hamlets, he replied, “We have to verify. We have to ask the Ministry of Home Affairs and Myanmar police forces.” Asked about the allegations of looting by paramilitary police officers, he said the police would investigate.He expressed surprise when told that Buddhist villagers had confessed to burning Rohingya homes, then added, “We recognize that many, many different allegations are there, but we need to verify who did it. It is very difficult in the current situation.”Zaw Htay defended the military operation in Rakhine. “The international community needs to understand who did the first terrorist attacks. If that kind of terrorist attack took place in European countries, in the United States, in London, New York, Washington, what would the media say?”NEIGHBOR TURNS ON NEIGHBORInn Din lies between the Mayu mountain range and the Bay of Bengal, about 50 km (30 miles) north of Rakhine’s state capital Sittwe. The settlement is made up of a scattering of hamlets around a school, clinic and Buddhist monastery. Buddhist homes cluster in the northern part of the village. For many years there had been tensions between the Buddhists and their Muslim neighbors, who accounted for almost 90 percent of the roughly 7,000 people in the village. But the two communities had managed to co-exist, fishing the coastal waters and cultivating rice in the paddies.In October 2016, Rohingya militants attacked three police posts in northern Rakhine – the beginning of a new insurgency. After the attacks, Rohingya in Inn Din said many Buddhists stopped hiring them as farmhands and home help. The Buddhists said the Rohingya stopped showing up for work.On Aug. 25 last year, the rebels struck again, hitting 30 police posts and an army base. The closest attack was just 4 km to the north. In Inn Din, several hundred fearful Buddhists took refuge in the monastery in the center of the village, more than a dozen of their number said. Inn Din’s Buddhist night watchman San Thein, 36, said Buddhist villagers feared being “swallowed up” by their Muslim neighbors. A Buddhist elder said all Rohingya, “including children,” were part of the insurgency and therefore “terrorists.”On Aug. 27, about 80 troops from Myanmar’s 33rd Light Infantry Division arrived in Inn Din, nine Buddhist villagers said. Two paramilitary police officers and Soe Chay, the retired soldier, said the troops belonged to the 11th infantry regiment of this division. The army officer in charge told villagers they must cook for the soldiers and act as lookouts at night, Soe Chay said. The officer promised his troops would protect Buddhist villagers from their Rohingya neighbors. Five Buddhist villagers said the officer told them they could volunteer to join security operations. Young volunteers would need their parents’ permission to join the troops, however.DETAINED: Reuters journalists Wa Lone (foreground) and Kyaw Soe Oo were arrested on Dec. 12 for allegedly obtaining confidential documents related to Rakhine. Here they are seen arriving for a court hearing in Yangon earlier this month.The army found willing participants among Inn Din’s Buddhist “security group,” nine members of the organization and two other villagers said. This informal militia was formed after violence broke out in 2012 between Rakhine’s Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims, sparked by reports of the rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men. Myanmar media reported at the time that the three were sentenced to death by a district court.Inn Din’s security group built watch huts around the Buddhist part of the village, and its members took turns to stand guard. Its ranks included Buddhist firefighters, school teachers, students and unemployed young men. They were useful to the military because they knew the local geography, said Inn Din’s Buddhist administrator, Maung Thein Chay.Most of the group’s 80 to 100 men armed themselves with machetes and sticks. They also had a handful of guns, according to one member. Some wore green fatigue-style clothing they called “militia suits.”In the days that followed the 33rd Light Infantry’s arrival, soldiers, police and Buddhist villagers burned most of the homes of Inn Din’s Rohingya Muslims, a dozen Buddhist residents said.Two of the paramilitary police officers, both members of the 8th Security Police Battalion, said their battalion raided Rohingya hamlets with soldiers from the newly arrived 33rd Light Infantry. One of the police officers said he received verbal orders from his commander to “go and clear” areas where Rohingya lived, which he took to mean to burn them.The second police officer described taking part in several raids on villages north of Inn Din. The raids involved at least 20 soldiers and between five and seven police, he said. A military captain or major led the soldiers, while a police captain oversaw the police team. The purpose of the raids was to deter the Rohingya from returning.“If they have a place to live, if they have food to eat, they can carry out more attacks,” he said. “That’s why we burned their houses, mainly for security reasons.”AFTERMATH: Reuters obtained this picture of the slain Rohingya men from a Buddhist elder. The image is deliberately blurred here; click on the arrow to view at full resolution. Reuters shared the photo with Luis Fondebrider, a forensic anthropologist. He said injuries on two of the bodies were consistent with “the action of a machete or something sharp.”“I want to be transparent on this case. I don’t want it to happen like that in the future.”A Rakhine Buddhist elder, explaining why he chose to speak to Reuters about the killingsSoldiers and paramilitary police wore civilian shirts and shorts to blend in with the villagers, according to the second police officer and Inn Din’s Buddhist administrator, Maung Thein Chay. If the media identified the involvement of security personnel, the police officer explained, “we would have very big problems.”A police spokesman, Colonel Myo Thu Soe, said he knew of no instances of security forces torching villages or wearing civilian clothing. Nor was there any order to “go and clear” or “set fire” to villages. “This is very much impossible,” he told Reuters. “If there are things like that, it should be reported officially, and it has to be investigated officially.”“As you’ve told me about these matters now, we will scrutinize and check back,” he added. “What I want to say for now is that as for the security forces, there are orders and instructions and step-by-step management, and they have to follow them. So, I don’t think these things happened.”The army did not respond to a request for comment.A medical assistant at the Inn Din village clinic, Aung Myat Tun, 20, said he took part in several raids. “Muslim houses were easy to burn because of the thatched roofs. You just light the edge of the roof,” he said. “The village elders put monks’ robes on the end of sticks to make the torches and soaked them with kerosene. We couldn’t bring phones. The police said they will shoot and kill us if they see any of us taking photos.”The night watchman San Thein, a leading member of the village security group, said troops first swept through the Muslim hamlets. Then, he said, the military sent in Buddhist villagers to burn the houses.“We got the kerosene for free from the village market after the kalars ran away,” he said, using a Burmese slur for people from South Asia.A Rakhine Buddhist youth said he thought he heard the sound of a child inside one Rohingya home that was burned. A second villager said he participated in burning a Rohingya home that was occupied.Soe Chay, the retired soldier who was to dig the grave for the 10 Rohingya men, said he participated in one killing. He told Reuters that troops discovered three Rohingya men and a woman hiding beside a haystack in Inn Din on Aug. 28. One of the men had a smartphone that could be used to take incriminating pictures.The soldiers told Soe Chay to “do whatever you want to them,” he said. They pointed out the man with the phone and told him to stand up. “I started hacking him with a sword, and a soldier shot him when he fell down.”Similar violence was playing out across a large part of northern Rakhine, dozens of Buddhist and Rohingya residents said.Data from the U.N. Operational Satellite Applications Programme shows scores of Rohingya villages in Rakhine state burned in an area stretching 110 km. New York-based Human Rights Watch says more than 350 villages were torched over the three months from Aug. 25, according to an analysis of satellite imagery.In the village of Laungdon, some 65 km north of Inn Din, Thar Nge, 38, said he was asked by police and local officials to join a Buddhist security group. “The army invited us to burn the kalar village at Hpaw Ti Kaung,” he said, adding that four villagers and nearly 20 soldiers and police were involved in the operation. “Police shot inside the village so all the villagers fled and then we set fire to it. Their village was burned because police believed the villagers supported Rohingya militants – that’s why they cleaned it with fire.”A Buddhist student from Ta Man Tha village, 15 km north of Laungdon, said he too participated in the burning of Rohingya homes. An army officer sought 30 volunteers to burn “kalar” villages, said the student. Nearly 50 volunteered and gathered fuel from motorbikes and from a market.“They separated us into several groups. We were not allowed to enter the village directly. We had to surround it and approach the village that way. The army would shoot gunfire ahead of us and then the army asked us to enter,” he said.“Muslim houses were easy to burn because of the thatched roofs. You just light the edge of the roof.”Buddhist villager Aung Myat TunAfter the Rohingya had fled Inn Din, Buddhist villagers took their property, including chickens and goats, Buddhist residents told Reuters. But the most valuable goods, mostly motorcycles and cattle, were collected by members of the 8th Security Police Battalion and sold, said the first police officer and Inn Din village administrator Maung Thein Chay. Maung Thein Chay said the commander of the 8th Battalion, Thant Zin Oo, struck a deal with Buddhist businessmen from other parts of Rakhine state and sold them cattle. The police officer said he had stolen four cows from Rohingya villagers, only for Thant Zin Oo to snatch them away.Reached by phone, Thant Zin Oo did not comment. Colonel Myo Thu Soe, the police spokesman, said the police would investigate the allegations of looting.By Sept. 1, several hundred Rohingya from Inn Din were sheltering at a makeshift camp on a nearby beach. They erected tarpaulin shelters to shield themselves from heavy rain.Among this group were the 10 Rohingya men who would be killed the next morning. Reuters has identified all of the 10 by speaking to witnesses among Inn Din’s Buddhist community and Rohingya relatives and witnesses tracked down in refugee camps in Bangladesh.Five of the men, Dil Mohammed, 35, Nur Mohammed, 29, Shoket Ullah, 35, Habizu, 40, and Shaker Ahmed, 45, were fishermen or fish sellers. The wealthiest of the group, Abul Hashim, 25, ran a store selling nets and machine parts to fishermen and farmers. Abdul Majid, a 45-year-old father of eight, ran a small shop selling areca nut wrapped in betel leaves, commonly chewed like tobacco. Abulu, 17, and Rashid Ahmed, 18, were high school students. Abdul Malik, 30, was an Islamic teacher.According to the statement released by the army on Jan. 10, security forces had gone to a coastal area where they “were attacked by about 200 Bengalis with sticks and swords.” The statement said that “as the security forces opened fire into the sky, the Bengalis dispersed and ran away. Ten of them were arrested.”Three Buddhist and more than a dozen Rohingya witnesses contradict this version of events. Their accounts differ from one another in some details. The Buddhists spoke of a confrontation between a small group of Rohingya men and some soldiers near the beach. But there is unanimity on a crucial point: None said the military had come under a large-scale attack in Inn Din.Government spokesman Zaw Htay referred Reuters to the army’s statement of Jan. 10 and declined to elaborate further. The army did not respond to a request for comment.The Rohingya witnesses, who were on or near the beach, said Islamic teacher Abdul Malik had gone back to his hamlet with his sons to collect food and bamboo for shelter. When he returned, a group of at least seven soldiers and armed Buddhist villagers were following him, these witnesses said. Abdul Malik walked towards the watching Rohingya Muslims unsteadily, with blood dripping from his head. Some witnesses said they had seen one of the armed men strike the back of Abdul Malik’s head with a knife.Then the military beckoned with their guns to the crowd of roughly 300 Rohingya to assemble in the paddies, these witnesses said. The soldiers and the Rohingya, hailing from different parts of Myanmar, spoke different languages. Educated villagers translated for their fellow Rohingya.“I could not hear much, but they pointed toward my husband and some other men to get up and come forward,” said Rehana Khatun, 22, the wife of Nur Mohammed, one of the 10 who were later slain. “We heard they wanted the men for a meeting. The military asked the rest of us to return to the beach.”Soldiers held and questioned the 10 men in a building at Inn Din’s school for a night, the military said. Rashid Ahmed and Abulu had studied there alongside Rakhine Buddhist students until the attacks by Rohingya rebels in October 2016. Schools were shut temporarily, disrupting the pair’s final year.“I just remember him sitting there and studying, and it was always amazing to me because I am not educated,” said Rashid Ahmed’s father, farmer Abdu Shakur, 50. “I would look at him reading. He would be the first one in the family to be educated.”A photograph, taken on the evening the men were detained, shows the two Rohingya students and the eight older men kneeling on a path beside the village clinic, most of them shirtless. They were stripped when first detained, a dozen Rohingya witnesses said. It isn’t clear why. That evening, Buddhist villagers said, the men were “treated” to a last meal of beef. They were provided with fresh clothing.On Sept. 2, the men were taken to scrubland north of the village, near a graveyard for Buddhist residents, six Buddhist villagers said. The spot is backed by a hill crested with trees. There, on their knees, the 10 were photographed again and questioned by security personnel about the disappearance of a local Buddhist farmer named Maung Ni, according to a Rakhine elder who said he witnessed the interrogation.Reuters was not able to establish what happened to Maung Ni. According to Buddhist neighbors, the farmer went missing after leaving home early on Aug. 25 to tend his cattle. Several Rakhine Buddhist and Rohingya villagers told Reuters they believed he had been killed, but they knew of no evidence connecting any of the 10 men to his disappearance. The army said in its Jan. 10 statement that “Bengali terrorists” had killed Maung Ni, but did not identify the perpetrators.Two of the men pictured behind the Rohingya prisoners in the photograph taken on the morning of Sept. 2 belong to the 8th Security Police Battalion. Reuters confirmed the identities of the two men from their Facebook pages and by visiting them in person.One of the two officers, Aung Min, a police recruit from Yangon, stands directly behind the captives. He looks at the camera as he holds a weapon. The other officer, police Captain Moe Yan Naing, is the figure on the top right. He walks with his rifle over his shoulder.The day after the two Reuters reporters were arrested in December, Myanmar’s government also announced that Moe Yan Naing had been arrested and was being investigated under the 1923 Official Secrets Act.Aung Min, who is not facing legal action, declined to speak to Reuters.Three Buddhist youths said they watched from a hut as the 10 Rohingya captives were led up a hill by soldiers towards the site of their deaths.One of the gravediggers, retired soldier Soe Chay, said Maung Ni’s sons were invited by the army officer in charge of the squad to strike the first blows.The first son beheaded the Islamic teacher, Abdul Malik, according to Soe Chay. The second son hacked another of the men in the neck.REUTERS INVESTIGATESMore Reuters investigations and long-form narrativesGot a confidential news tip? Reuters Investigates offers several ways to securely contact our reporters“After the brothers sliced them both with swords, the squad fired with guns. Two to three shots to one person,” said Soe Chay. A second gravedigger, who declined to be identified, confirmed that soldiers had shot some of the men.In its Jan. 10 statement, the military said the two brothers and a third villager had “cut the Bengali terrorists” with swords and then, in the chaos, four members of the security forces had shot the captives. “Action will be taken against the villagers who participated in the case and the members of security forces who broke the Rules of Engagement under the law,” the statement said. It didn’t spell out those rules.Tun Aye, one of the sons of Maung Ni, has been detained on murder charges, his lawyer said on Jan. 13. Contacted by Reuters on Feb. 8, the lawyer declined to comment further. Reuters was unable to reach the other brother.In October, Inn Din locals pointed two Reuters reporters towards an area of brush behind the hill where they said the killings took place. The reporters discovered a newly cut trail leading to soft, recently disturbed earth littered with bones. Some of the bones were entangled with scraps of clothing and string that appeared to match the cord that is seen binding the captives’ wrists in the photographs. The immediate area was marked by the smell of death.Reuters showed photographs of the site to three forensic experts: Homer Venters, director of programs at Physicians for Human Rights; Derrick Pounder, a pathologist who has consulted for Amnesty International and the United Nations; and Luis Fondebrider, president of the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team, who investigated the graves of those killed under Argentina’s military junta in the 1970s and 1980s. All observed human remains, including the thoracic part of a spinal column, ribs, scapula, femur and tibia. Pounder said he couldn’t rule out the presence of animal bones as well.The Rakhine Buddhist elder provided Reuters reporters with a photograph which shows the aftermath of the execution. In it, the 10 Rohingya men are wearing the same clothing as in the previous photo and are tied to each other with the same yellow cord, piled into a small hole in the earth, blood pooling around them. Abdul Malik, the Islamic teacher, appears to have been beheaded. Abulu, the student, has a gaping wound in his neck. Both injuries appear consistent with Soe Chay’s account.Fondebrider reviewed this picture. He said injuries visible on two of the bodies were consistent with “the action of a machete or something sharp that was applied on the throat.”Some family members did not know for sure that the men had been killed until Reuters returned to their shelters in Bangladesh in January.“I can’t explain what I feel inside. My husband is dead,” said Rehana Khatun, wife of Nur Mohammed. “My husband is gone forever. I don’t want anything else, but I want justice for his death.”In Inn Din, the Buddhist elder explained why he chose to share evidence of the killings with Reuters. “I want to be transparent on this case. I don’t want it to happen like that in future.”last_img read more

We Finally Get a Full Look at Blade Runner 2049

We Finally Get a Full Look at Blade Runner 2049

first_img Rutger Hauer, ‘Blade Runner’ Actor, Dies at 752019 in Sci-Fi: What Movies, Games, and TV Told Us Will Happen This Year After months of waiting in trepidation for any hint of the new Blade Runner film’s quality, Warner Bros. released another trailer.Blade Runner 2049, which stars Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, Robin Wright, Dave Bautista, and others, takes place 30 years after the original.In some ways, the new film looks like the classic, thanks to a shot through rainy Los Angeles streets that looks like it was picked straight from it. However, we also get glimpses of a dusty yellow landscape (possibly another planet) and an empty but decorated home.We’re still unclear on how the sequel will tie in with the original, but Warner Bros. released a brief plot synopsis:“A new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what’s left of society into chaos. K’s discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for 30 years.”We’re still surprised that this sequel even exists. A sequel of some sort has been in production since 1999. The original Blade Runner, released in 1982, while highly regarded nowadays as a science fiction, noir classic, wasn’t consistently received upon release by critics. Ford and then-director Ridley Scott tangled on set, and Scott himself disagreed with the studio in the following decades on proper cuts of the film. It’s why multiple versions of the film exist, although according to Scott, there’s only one real version.With the sequel, we can finally get some concrete answers on questions posed in the first film. Is Deckard a replicant? What ever happened to Deckard and Rachael? What was Gaff’s deal?Blade Runner 2049 can probably never be separated from its predecessor, but it’s working to stand on its own, at least based on this first footage. Additionally, the film is directed by Denis Villeneuve, who was at the helm for this year’s optimistic but tragic science fiction piece Arrival. Scott is on board as an executive producer.Blade Runner 2049 will hit theaters on Oct. 6, 2017. Stay on targetlast_img read more

Need Help Retaining Employees Some Apps for That

Need Help Retaining Employees Some Apps for That

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Recognizing an employee for a job well done can be a big morale booster and doesn’t have to cost a lot.These days, you can choose from a variety of low-cost web-based rewards-and-recognition programs to give employees a public shout out.The best part: These apps are based on the same kind of social sharing that make Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest popular, which means employees pick up on how to use them fairly quickly, and they’re fun. And while you’re recognizing someone for going above and beyond, they can share their accomplishment with other employees, and in some cases family and friends, making them look good — and you too.Getting staff to feel good about what they do and where they work pays off, according to a recent employee engagement survey from Aon Hewitt, a human-resources consulting firm based in Lincolnshire, Ill. As the economy improves, it is likely to get harder to hold on to top talent. Smart organizations will find out what matters most to workers and find ways to provide it, it says.One way companies are improving employee engagement is by singling workers out for their accomplishments more often — in some cases on a daily or weekly basis — and encouraging other staff to do likewise, and be public with their praise. The popularity of big social networks such as Facebook and Twitter has pushed long-time vendors of rewards-and-recognition programs to incorporate their own social-media platforms into what they offer, and lured startups into the business. Because many entry-level versions of these social sharing apps cost nothing or next to it, businesses of all sizes in all kinds of industries can, and are, using them, including companies in everything from pharmaceuticals to retail.Related: How to Attract — And Retain — Staff When You Can’t Pay Big BucksMany of these services can be used as desktop or smartphone apps. Most have dashboards that managers can use to track staffers’ recognition and rewards activity, budgets and spending. Here’s some of what’s available:GiveAWOWEmployees can use Terryberry’s virtual bulletin board to give each other virtual high-fives, then share recognitions they receive on Facebook and Twitter. The program connects with a company’s intranet so employees can use their existing user name and password to log in. It can be used on its own or as part of the Grand Rapids, Mich., company’s complete suite of employee rewards and recognition programs.Fun fact: Employees can earn instant Billboard music downloads.Available on: Web-based desktop application, iPhone, iPad or Android appCost: 30-day free trial; after that, prices start at $99 a month for up to 50 users.iAppreciateThe iAppreciate smartphone app is one of several offerings O.C. Tanner Co. has unveiled as the 85-year-old Salt Lake City company integrates social media into its extensive rewards-and-recognition product line. A company owner can use the app to set a date for an employee recognition event, invite people to speak, create certificates in 14 languages, and set reminders for birthday and anniversaries. Employees can use the app to send e-cards to fellow workers. Related applications let people share their accomplishments on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, and use a virtual bulletin board to post digital certificates and notes.Fun fact: The app can be used to create “e-buttons” with messages like “You Did It!” or “Great Job!” that employees can display on their digital bulletin boards.Available on: iOS, Droid and BlackBerryCost: Smartphone app is free; costs for other O.C. Tanner applications vary.Related: Gordon Ramsay’s Lessons for Motivating a Sales TeamSparcetLaunched in February by Charleston, S.C., startup SPARC LLC, Sparcets are virtual recognitions that managers can give to employees or employees can give to each other via email along with a personal note explaining why they’re giving someone the digital thank you. Employees can sign up for the service by uploading an existing Facebook or LinkedIn profile. They can also link their Sparcet account to outside social networks.Fun fact: Managers can use the app’s group message function to tell a project team or entire department they’ve done a fantastic job.Available on: Desktop, iOS devices and Android phonesCost: Free; beta version of upgraded SPARC’D employee-recognition service with more features is $3.89 per employee per month.AchieversCompany owners can use the app from Achievers Inc., a San Francisco and Toronto-based rewards-and-recognition vendor formerly known as I Love Rewards, to award points to workers for sharing a job opening on their social network, achieving company goals, or just because. Employees use a Facebook-style personal page to track points that they can save toward trips, gift cards or merchandise. They also can use the app’s news feed feature to give fellow workers points or comment on their achievements.Fun fact: Besides using them toward trips and merchandise, employees can turn accumulated points into a donation to a favorite charity.Available on: Web-based, mobile-optimized application works on desktop computers, smartphones and tabletsCost: Varies by company size and how program is structured, but generally about 1 percent of total annual payroll.Related: A New Tool to Compare Health-Care Plans Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 5 min read July 5, 2012 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now »last_img read more

Cristina Torres Gómez confirms she intends to run again for mayor

Cristina Torres Gómez confirms she intends to run again for mayor

first_imgPlaya del Carmen, Q.R. — The municipal president of Solidarity, Cristina Torres Gómez, announced that she intends to submit the necessary documentation to participate in the internal process of the National Action Party (PAN), to run again for mayor of Solidaridad.“Now I am going to participate in the registration, present the documentation while continuing to govern Solidarity,” the mayor said.According to Carlos Jiménez Jiménez, leader of PAN in Solidaridad, the evaluation of the pre-candidates before the Electoral Institute of Quintana Roo will begin sometime at the beginning of February.While the internal selection process takes place, Cristina Torres affirmed that she will continue working at the head of the municipal government and reiterated that she is only part of the “registration mechanism”.Torres Gómez was nominated as municipal president by PAN as an external candidate in the last electoral process and in 2016, so if she were chosen again, she would go to re-election.Previously, both Carlos Jiménez and Alejandra Cárdenas Nájera, municipal leader of the PRD in Solidaridad, have shown their support for Torres Gómez.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Marriott International has launched an allinclusi

Marriott International has launched an allinclusi

first_imgMarriott International has launched an all-inclusive platform to bring its brands, scale and trusted service to growing, global vacation segment, leveraging its Marriott Bonvoy travel program and iconic brands, including The Ritz-Carlton and Westin Hotels & ResortsThe company also announced that it has signed management contracts with hotel developers who plan to build five new all-inclusive resorts, investing more than $800 million and demonstrating their confidence in Marriott International’s scale, loyalty platform and operational expertise. The resorts are expected to open between 2022 and 2025.“Our new, all-inclusive resort platform is a natural progression for Marriott International,” said Tony Capuano, Marriott International’s Executive Vice President and Global Chief Development Officer. “It will provide the ownership community a game-changing value proposition for their luxury and premium resort projects around the world, while providing guests a new vacation option with brands they trust.”Marriott International plans to further expand its all-inclusive portfolio in popular leisure destinations worldwide with a mix of new-build properties and conversions of existing resorts, including properties currently in the Marriott International portfolio. The new platform will provide the company’s 133 million Marriott Bonvoy members the option to earn and redeem points for this convenient, pay-one-price concept. Marriott Internationallast_img read more