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Your Options For Couch Touring This Halloween Weekend Are Bountiful

Your Options For Couch Touring This Halloween Weekend Are Bountiful

first_imgAny live music fan knows that the best place to celebrate Halloween is at a concert! With artists regularly putting on themed performances, there’s always an added layer of excitement for a Halloween show. As October 31st falls on a Monday this year, there is no shortage of live music to enjoy over the coming days! Fortunately, if you can’t make it to any shows, there are also plenty of options to enjoy from the comfort of your couch.It starts with The Disco Biscuits, who kick off a three night run at the Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas tonight through this Saturday. Tonight’s show will be a normal start time, while the subsequent two nights will come on post-Phish, so the Biscuits certainly have the late night grooves covered! Meanwhile,  Twiddle also kicks off a three night run at a Brooklyn Bowl tonight, the original venue in Brooklyn, NY, where they’ll set up shop from tonight through the 29th as well.Phil Lesh is also gearing up for a big three night run at the famed Capitol Theatre, running shows at the Port Chester, NY venue on October 28th, 29th, and 31st. Lesh will be joined by some all-star musicians over the big run, including Larry Campbell, Luther Dickinson, Barry Sless, Jason Crosby, John Molo, Teresa Williams & Nicki Bluhm on night one (10/28); Luther Dickinson, Scott Metzger, Barry Sless, Jason Crosby, John Molo, & Nicki Bluhm on night two (10/29); and Phil-O-Ween with Larry Campbell, Luther Dickinson, Barry Sless, Jason Crosby, John Molo, Teresa Williams, & Nicki Bluhm to close out the run.Not only are those great shows on the table, but Greensky Bluegrass has also announced a webcast of their late night show on October 30th in Las Vegas, as they’ll also be playing after Phish at the Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas. All of the webcasts mentioned above will be hosted by nugs.tv. Our partner LiveList is also running promotions for free webcast codes to Twiddle and Phil Lesh & Friends, so don’t miss a chance to win!Of course, Phish is also streaming their Vegas shows through the LivePhish platform, Widespread Panic will be offering live audio streams of their three-night run in Broomfield, CO, Umphrey’s McGee just announced a webcast of their two-night run in St. Louis, MO, and SiriusXM Jam ON is streaming live from Suwannee Hulaween all weekend long. You can see their schedule, which includes sets from The String Cheese Incident, My Morning Jacket, Umphrey’s McGee, Greensky Bluegrass, Benevento Russ & Burbridge, STS9 and more, right here.If you’re looking for something a little different, the Voodoo Music + Arts Experience is also streaming sets this weekend, with shows from Arcade Fire, The Weeknd, Beats Antique, Claypool Lennon Delirium and more. Check out their schedule here.Finally, we can’t help but promote our own stream, as we’ve teamed up with master videographer MKDevo to offer a full video stream of tonight’s Dopapod and Pigeons Playing Ping Pong performance at Toad’s Place in New Haven, CT. We know it’s not a Halloween show, but we can’t wait to watch both of these exciting bands take the stage on their remarkable fall tour!You can catch all of these official streams in the Live For Live Music channel on LiveList, specifically catered with live stream and YouTube content that is directly suited for you! Check it out, embedded below.last_img read more

Study signals need to screen genes for stem cell transplants

Study signals need to screen genes for stem cell transplants

first_imgRegenerative medicine using human pluripotent stem cells to grow transplantable tissue outside the body carries the promise to treat a range of intractable disorders, such as diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.However, a research team from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI), Harvard Medical School (HMS), and the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has found that as stem cell lines grow in a lab dish, they often acquire mutations in the TP53 (p53) gene, an important tumor suppressor responsible for controlling cell growth and division.Their research suggests that genetic sequencing technologies should be used to screen for mutated cells in stem cell cultures, so that cultures with mutated cells can be excluded from scientific experiments and clinical therapies. If such methods are not employed it could lead to an elevated cancer risk in those receiving transplants.The paper, published online today in the journal Nature, comes at just the right time, the researchers said, as experimental treatments using human pluripotent stem cells are ramping up across the country.“Our results underscore the need for the field of regenerative medicine to proceed with care,” said the study’s co-corresponding author Kevin Eggan, an HSCI principal faculty member and the director of stem cell biology for the Stanley Center. Eggan’s lab in Harvard University’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology uses human stem cells to study the mechanisms of brain disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, intellectual disability, and schizophrenia.The research, the team said, should not discourage the pursuit of experimental treatments but instead be heeded as a call to screen rigorously all cell lines for mutations at various stages of development as well as immediately before transplantation.“Our findings indicate that an additional series of quality control checks should be implemented during the production of stem cells and their downstream use in developing therapies,” Eggan said. “Fortunately, these genetic checks can be readily performed with precise, sensitive, and increasingly inexpensive sequencing methods.”With human stem cells, researchers can re-create human tissue in the lab. This enables them to study the mechanisms by which certain genes can predispose an individual to a particular disease. Eggan has been working with Steve McCarroll, associate professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and director of genetics at the Stanley Center, to study how genes shape the biology of neurons, which can be derived from these stem cells.McCarroll’s lab recently discovered a common, precancerous condition in which a blood stem cell in the body acquires a pro-growth mutation and then outcompetes a person’s normal stem cells, becoming the dominant generator of his or her blood cells. People in whom this condition has appeared are 12 times likelier to develop blood cancer later in life. The study’s lead authors, Florian Merkle and Sulagna Ghosh, collaborated with Eggan and McCarroll to test whether laboratory-grown stem cells might be vulnerable to an analogous process.“Cells in the lab, like cells in the body, acquire mutations all the time,” said McCarroll, co-corresponding author. “Mutations in most genes have little impact on the larger tissue or cell line. But cells with a pro-growth mutation can outcompete other cells, become very numerous, and ‘take over’ a tissue. We found that this process of clonal selection — the basis of cancer formation in the body — is also routinely happening in laboratories.”To find acquired mutations, the researchers performed genetic analyses on 140 stem cell lines — 26 of which were developed for therapeutic purposes using Good Manufacturing Practices, a quality control standard set by regulatory agencies in multiple countries. The remaining 114 were listed on the National Institutes of Health registry of human pluripotent stem cells.“While we expected to find some mutations in stem cell lines, we were surprised to find that about 5 percent of the stem cell lines we analyzed had acquired mutations in a tumor-suppressing gene called p53,” said Merkle.Nicknamed the “guardian of the genome,” p53 controls cell growth and cell death. People who inherit p53 mutations develop a rare disorder called Li-Fraumeni Syndrome, which confers a near 100 percent risk of developing cancer in a wide range of tissue types.The specific mutations that the researchers observed are “dominant-negative” mutations, meaning that when they are present on even one copy of p53, they are able to compromise the function of the normal protein, whose components are made from both gene copies. The exact same dominant-negative mutations are among the most commonly observed mutations in human cancers.“These precise mutations are very familiar to cancer scientists. They are among the worst p53 mutations to have,” said Ghosh, a co-lead author of the study.The researchers performed a sophisticated set of DNA analyses to rule out the possibility that these mutations had been inherited rather than acquired as the cells grew in the lab. In subsequent experiments, the Harvard scientists found that p53 mutant cells outperformed and outcompeted non-mutant cells in the lab dish. In other words, a culture with a million healthy cells and one p53 mutant cell, said Eggan, could quickly become a culture of only mutant cells.“The spectrum of tissues at risk for transformation when harboring a p53 mutation includes many of those that we would like to target for repair with regenerative medicine using human pluripotent stem cells,” said Eggan. Those organs include the pancreas, brain, blood, bone, skin, liver, and lungs.However, Eggan and McCarroll emphasized that now that this phenomenon has been found, inexpensive gene-sequencing tests will allow researchers to identify and remove from the production line cell cultures with worrisome mutations that might prove dangerous after transplantation.The researchers point out in their paper that screening approaches to identify these p53 mutations and others that confer cancer risk already exist and are used in cancer diagnostics. In fact, in an ongoing clinical trial that is transplanting cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, gene sequencing is used to ensure the transplanted cell products are free of dangerous mutations.This work was supported by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, the Rosetrees Trust, the Azrieli Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Wellcome Trust, the Medical Research Council, the Academy of Medical Sciences, and by grants from the NIH.last_img read more

Vaccine skepticism lurks in town famous for syphilis study

Vaccine skepticism lurks in town famous for syphilis study

first_imgTUSKEGEE, Ala. (AP) — The coronavirus immunization campaign is off to a shaky start in Tuskegee, Alabama. Area leaders point to a lingering distrust of medicine that is linked to a 40-year government study here that used unknowing Black men as guinea pigs to study syphilis. Several people in the mostly Black city are trying to set an example by getting vaccinated. One of those is Black Tuskegee attorney Fred Gray. Gray is the one who filed a lawsuit on behalf of the men affected by the syphilis study that resulted in a $9 million settlement. The now-90-year-old Gray stresses that the syphilis study and the COVID-19 vaccine are completely different.last_img read more

Megan Hilty on Bombshell Concert: ‘It’s Going to be Amazing!’

Megan Hilty on Bombshell Concert: ‘It’s Going to be Amazing!’

first_img View Comments Megan Hilty With the Smashing news that Bombshell is heading to the Great White Way for one night only, we’re all eager for more details about the June 8 Actor’s Fund benefit concert at the Minskoff Theatre. Headliner Megan Hilty recently told Broadway.com, “It’s going to be amazing! It’s going to be a great, great, reunion for us.”Joshua Bergasse will co-direct and choreograph the show and Hilty revealed: “I know that Josh is going to start with the dancers in May and then add us as soon as they’re ready.” The score of the fictional musical was penned by Scott Wittman and Marc Shaiman and is famously demanding—will the real-life Broadway bombshell be given any downtime during the production? “I don’t think so…from the set list it doesn’t look like it so we’ll see if I can actually do it!”We know that Hilty can dig deep! Besides her role on Smash, she is known for starring on Broadway as Glinda in Wicked and Doralee in 9 to 5 as well as TV’s Sean Saves the World. Hilty recently signed on to lead an untitled Judah Miller comedy for ABC, co-starring Marissa Jaret Winokur.Bombshell follows the life of Marilyn Monroe, from her earlier days as Norma Jeane Mortenson to her untimely death at the age of 36. The fight for title role fueled the rivalry between New York newcomer Karen Cartwright and Broadway vet Ivy Lynn, played by Katharine McPhee and Hilty, respectively. McPhee and fellow fellow co-stars from the NBC drama Christian Borle, Will Chase and Debra Messing are all expected to reunite for event, which will be co-directed by Wittman.center_img Star Fileslast_img read more

Lady Beetle Revisited

Lady Beetle Revisited

first_imgThere are more than 6,000 species of lady beetles in the world, most having different natural histories and roles in their environments. Being able to identify the different species is vital to understanding them, and knowing what they look like is typically a major part of that process.That’s where Brad Hounkpati comes in. Hounkpati, a doctoral candidate in entomology at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), established a replacement reference specimen for an important lady beetle species found in South Africa. His work was published in the March 2019 edition of the taxonomic journal Zootaxa.Hounkpati, a Fulbright scholar at UGA, is the first Borlaug LEAP Fellow from Togo, a West African country, and one of the first LEAP fellows hosted by UGA. His primary focus of study has been on the taxonomy of lady beetles in western Africa. His interest in lady beetles started in 1995 when he was working to battle sugar cane pests on Togo farms.As part of his UGA graduate research, he started investigating Rodolia iceryae, a brownish hemispherical beetle, for its potential use as a biological control agent on West African farms. The beetle, which is native to Africa, was described in scientific literature. Hounkpati thought it could be a good analog to the North American lady beetles that were being used as biological control agents in the states.However, when Hounkpati researched the lady beetle in the official literature and museum collections, he realized that the name-bearing type specimen was missing.“Knowing that the vedalia lady beetle (Rodolia cardinalis) and Rodolia iceryae are already established as specialist predators of giant scale insects, and that the vedalia lady beetle occurs in Africa, I wanted to see if Rodolia iceryae has been collected in the West African region,” Hounkpati said. “After unsuccessful research in the two largest insect museums in West Africa, I was quickly interested in knowing more about Rodolia iceryae.”The genus Rodolia is made up of many species of lady beetles that are known to feed on small mites, aphids and scale insects, making them great potential agents of biological control. Members of the Rodolia genus have been used to control pest insects all around the world as far back as 1888.Through his research, Hounkpati found that Rodolia iceryae was originally described by Victorian-age entomologist Oliver Erichson Janson in 1887. But in the century since it was first described, the original specimens had been lost. While Janson’s description was preserved in published literature, it was vague. The loss of the original physical specimen — called a “holotype” in taxonomy circles — put a hole in the scientific record. No one had the physical specimen or an original image to go with the description. There was no way to clarify ambiguity in Janson’s original text.Hounkpati, along with Juanita A. Forrester, an entomologist at Chattahoochee Technical College, and Joseph V. McHugh, a UGA CAES entomology professor and curator of arthropods at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, helped establish that the type material of Rodolia iceryae, originally examined and described by Janson, was lost.Together they helped to find museum specimens that represented the same species described by Janson. They wrote a new, more detailed description of Rodolia iceryae that clarifies the ambiguity about the species’ identity. One of the specimens was chosen to serve as the neotype — the official replacement for the missing original holotype — and the physical reference for that species name. “With this neotype established, the appearance of the species would be clarified,” Hounkpati said. “This would be very helpful in future surveys to recognize Rodolia iceryae in West Africa. If found, that could be the beginning of more research on its efficiency in controlling giant scale insects in West Africa.”The team found that Rodolia iceryae can be recognized by its distinctive genitalia, hemispherical body, a blood-red semicircle on the base of its forewings and its head shape. Specifically, the male genitalia are notable due to an extreme curvature, almost to the point of forming a complete circle.This neotype will hopefully aid the taxonomy of ladybird beetles in the Afrotropical region. This clarification of the concept of Rodolia iceryae in the taxonomic record will help scientists identify the beetle for biological control use in Africa and across the world.McHugh, who works with Hounkpati on his graduate research, says projects like this help build a strong foundation to support other types of research on insects in the region.“Taxonomy is constantly growing and being refined,” McHugh said. “Having a physical reference specimen makes the meaning of a species name clear. It also makes people feel more connected to a species. It’s one thing to have a description and a name; it’s another to be able to look at an actual specimen and know that ‘This is the thing that is actually out there walking around.’”To read the full paper, visit dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4563.2.12. For more information about the UGA Collection of Arthropods, visit site.caes.uga.edu/ugca/.last_img read more

Trans-Sylvania Productions Covid-19 Updates

Trans-Sylvania Productions Covid-19 Updates

first_imgPostponed  Uwharrie Forest Gravel Grinder (May 9, 2020)Uwharrie Gravel Run (May 9, 2020)Swatara Creek Run (May 16, 2020) June 2020 Events We have two events (Holly Shelter Gravel Grinder and Holly Shelter Gravel Run) at the beginning of the month that we will make a decision on around the middle to end of May. We also have two events (Rattling Creek Run and Rattling MTB Marathon) scheduled at the end of June that we will make a decision on around the middle of June. Canceled/Rescheduled to 2021 Trans-Sylvania Mountain Bike Epic – New Date is May 25-29, 2021Seven Mountains Creek Run – New Date is May 29, 2021 It is our intention to host these races in 2020.  When we know that it is safe to have events again, we will assess the situation and work out a new date with each location.  With the uncertainty of COVID-19 and when we can host races again, we have made some decisions to our May events.  See below about those decisions.  Virtual Races We are finishing up putting together some run and cycling virtual races.  We hope this will give you all a little competition to look forward to while we’re waiting to get back to competing together in person.  We will compete for sponsor prizes, TSP swag and credit towards future TSP events.  More to come on this soon. last_img read more

Navies from 15 Countries Attend Warships Conference in Rio de Janeiro

Navies from 15 Countries Attend Warships Conference in Rio de Janeiro

first_imgNew ships on the wayVice Adm. Cunha said the Submarine Development Program, which is building four conventional and one nuclear-powered submarine, is essential to fulfill this mission.“The Brazilian Navy, however, is not limited to warfare, it is also a navy that develops social programs, contributes to the development of the defense industry, is committed to international agreements, and works on search and rescue missions,” Vice Adm. Cunha said. “The Brazilian Navy needs to secure properly tested, reliable, and high-tech vessels, with high performance at sea, to complete our thousand tasks and missions.”According to Rear Admiral Hermann Ibere Boehmer, head of MB’s Procurement and Program Management, the Tamandaré-Class Project, which handles the construction of four corvettes, is the most important project to upgrade MB’s current fleet. “Our vessels need to be upgraded. We have 11 aging surface ships, averaging 36 years. Except for the Barroso Corvette, they have all been operating for more than 20 years,” said Rear Adm. Ibere, adding that the modern Tamandaré-class corvettes are expected by 2024.Partnering to combat common threatsMost speakers stressed the importance of participating in international missions, training with other navies, and the exchange of experiences and collaboration among countries to fight the threats to security in the region.“The Uruguayan Navy is well-known for its commitment to peacekeeping missions, although the navy has less than 5,000 members. In recent years we participated in several international missions; we have two bases in Antarctica and we also carry out missions such as maritime search and rescue, border control, and control over jurisdictional waters, an area equivalent to double the country’s land mass,” said Rear Admiral Ricardo Della Santa, commander of the Uruguayan Navy.Rear Adm. Della Santa also addressed upgrading the fleet of the Uruguayan Navy. To overcome budget challenges, the officer said that Uruguay is considering the acquisition of ships from other countries, including Brazil’s Inhaúma-class corvettes. “Today, on the event’s first day, I made several contacts for projects we intend to carry out, and we will possibly meet partners here to make them a reality,” Rear Adm. Della Santa said. The conference facilitates solutions for these matters.Captain José Jorge Fortín Aguilar, chief of the Honduran Navy General Staff, spoke about the challenges faced to protect his country’s maritime border, and stressed that combating narcotrafficking is the priority. “From January to June 2019, we made 35 arrests and seized 223 kilograms of cocaine and 69 kg of cocaine paste. We need more personnel, new vessels, and training to be able to complete the mission. A coastal patrol vessel is under construction and will be delivered in December,” Capt. Fortín said.The conference ended with a tour of the P120 Amazonas OPV, which MB incorporated in 2012 to monitor the Blue Amazon. The vessel has great autonomy and the ability to operate with a helicopter and speedboats. By Nelza Oliveira/Diálogo September 10, 2019 Brazil hosted the Warships and Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) Latin America Conference, June 25-27, 2019. Navy representatives from 15 countries — Argentina, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, the United States, and Uruguay — attended the eighth edition of the annual event in Rio de Janeiro. This is the fourth time Brazil has hosted the conference since its 2012 inception. Prior editions took place in Colombia (2014), Ecuador (2015), Peru (2016), and Chile (2017).With support from the Brazilian Navy (MB, in Portuguese), 130 guests, including service members and representatives from the naval construction sector, and security and defense products, attended the conference. The objective of the event was to propose solutions to develop naval defense policies, to offer information on new resources and means, and to exchange experiences among navies worldwide.Brazilian service members opened the event by presenting an MB overview. Vice Admiral José Augusto Vieira da Cunha de Menezes, MB commander, said that the force is responsible for protecting the region known as the Blue Amazon, an area of 1.3 million square miles of sea, rich in Brazilian minerals and oil.last_img read more

Government shutdown ends as Congress passes 2-year funding deal

Government shutdown ends as Congress passes 2-year funding deal

first_img continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Congress has reached a deal to fund the federal government for two years, ending a brief government shutdown. The previous funding measure expired at midnight Thursday; the president is expected to sign the measure.The budget increases defense and domestic spending over two years, lifts the debt ceiling (which would have required congressional action in the next few weeks) and provides billions in disaster aid. Funding for the National Flood Insurance Program is included in this spending bill, and it also retroactively extends tax breaks for mortgage insurance and forgiven mortgage debt for 2017 tax filings.last_img read more

Three cybersecurity tips for credit unions in a COVID world

Three cybersecurity tips for credit unions in a COVID world

first_imgWhen the COVID-19 pandemic hit, credit unions everywhere rolled out business disaster recovery and business continuity plans. Alongside drive-thru services and social distancing, credit unions implemented cybersecurity policies to maintain data integrity and safeguard customer data. States and municipalities are now beginning to lift stay-at-home mandates, but credit union employees who can work from home are still being encouraged to do so. This will continue to put cybersecurity in the spotlight.After all, the pandemic might have changed working conditions, but that didn’t stop cyber criminals from trying to take advantage. Phishing attempts have increased almost 350%. Banking trojans have returned, and the instant transition to remote work resulted in a slew of new vulnerabilities overnight. While a complete security overhaul might be a bit much to ask of overextended IT departments, these tips can help maintain your cybersecurity and keep from being exploited.1. Video ConferencingIt’s very likely that you’ve seen videos of users falling for so-called “Zoombombing” meeting traps. This is easily preventable. Most of the popular web conferencing tools like Zoom, GoToMeeting and WebEx have beefed up their privacy and security features. Be sure to review them before holding a sensitive virtual meeting. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

DCSA rolls out standards for digital exchange of operational vessel schedules

DCSA rolls out standards for digital exchange of operational vessel schedules

first_img“Digitising them is necessary if we want to build a higher degree of effectiveness and efficiency into the fabric of container shipping processes, and this release is an important step in that direction. The release of the standards comes at a time when the schedule reliability of container carriers is particularly challenged by the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. “With the new standards in place, carriers can digitally publish their schedules, and their partners and operational service providers can subscribe to the carrier’s feed to automatically receive updates, or retrieve updates as needed,” DCSA said. According to Copenhagen-based Sea Intelligence, since the coronavirus outbreak in February, and the blank sailings that followed, there has not been a material negative impact on schedule reliability, but rather an improving trend heading into June 2020. “Ultimately, the more transparency and efficiency we build into these fundamental processes the more each stakeholder will be able to trust and benefit in terms of lower costs, increased productivity, greater innovation, a better customer experience, and less impact on the environment.” “We are fast approaching the lowest level we have recorded since we started measuring reliability in 2012. Additionally, only 15% of the services had May 2020 reliability over 95%, which is the lowest recorded share,” Alan Murphy, CEO, Sea-Intelligence, said. The group has also published OVS API definitions on the SwaggerHub open source API development platform, where future enhancements will be published. “Operational vessel schedules are core to the functioning of the container shipping industry,” said Thomas Bagge, CEO of DCSA. center_img The group believes this will provide complete vessel schedule transparency, increasing efficiency and enabling better planning and optimisation of shipping activities. Digital Container Shipping Association (DCSA), a non-profit group established to further digitalisation of container shipping technology standards, has published standards for the exchange of operational vessel schedules (OVS). The standards can be implemented by vessel operators, as well as their Vessel Sharing Agreement (VSA) partners and operational service providers, to enable automatic sharing of schedule information. The DCSA OVS standard publication comprises a set of documents: However, the consultancy found that of those offered services, only 37% of deep-sea services provided over 85% schedule reliability. The DCSA Industry Blueprint 2.0 with OVS schedule definitions and an updated glossary of termsThe DCSA Information Model 2.0DCSA Data Interface Standards for OVS 1.0 and associated Reading Guideslast_img read more