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Lecture analyzes border deaths

Lecture analyzes border deaths

first_imgDeath is a powerful and interesting thing, according to Lawrence Taylor, vice president of international affairs and professor of anthropology at the National University of Ireland. Taylor gave a lecture titled “Death in the Desert: Conflicting Moral Geographies on the U.S. Mexico Border” Monday at the Vander Vennett Theatre in the Saint Mary’s Student Center. Taylor said death is often used as an event to promote certain ideas to bring about change. In his lecture, Taylor discussed two such examples in which death encouraged new legislation pertaining to the U.S. Mexico border. The first event was the death of 14 people who were lost in the desert in an attempt to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in May 2001. “All you have to do is get lost, and that’s what happened,” he said. “These were people entering the United States without papers.” Taylor said an inexperienced smuggler was leading the immigrants, believed he saw the headlights of a border patrol car and led them off course. The second event Taylor discussed was the death of Kris Eggle, a U.S. park ranger who was killed in August 2002 while in pursuit of a Mexican hitman who had crossed the border to escape the Mexican police. “Park rangers in this part of the world are very often trained in enforcement,” he said. “The enforcement that they’re looking for is not somebody who is lighting illegal campfires, but drug smugglers.” According to Taylor, different groups involved in border issues used these deaths in an attempt to gain support for their causes. One such group was Humane Borders, an activist group that places water tanks in various locations in the desert so immigrants who cross the border do not die of thirst. A rival group, Taylor said, is the Minutemen, seeks better border patrol to prevent immigrants from entering the United States. Taylor said Humane Borders attempted to use the 14 deaths as a way to gain permission to make water tanks available in the desert. “With the 14 who died … a group of local activists, including some attorneys, who are pro-immigrant, decided to sue the Department of the Interior for the deaths,” he said. “The argument for that was that Humane Borders, had previous to the deaths by about a month, a month and a half, had gone to the … refuge people who directly control that, and asked for permission to put water tanks out, and were turned down.” According to Taylor, this tactic was unsuccessful in its attempt to gain support for the pro-immigrant cause. With the other death event, Taylor said Eggle’s parents visited the border and spoke with a number of anti-immigration groups. The story gained media attention, and eventually, legislation was passed to pay for a Kris Eggle Memorial Fence, which would be erected on the border. “Some people say ‘I now know or believe my child died for a purpose,’ and that purpose is often legislative,” he said.last_img read more

Craig muMs Grant’s A Sucker Emcee & More for Labyrinth Theater Company’s New Season

Craig muMs Grant’s A Sucker Emcee & More for Labyrinth Theater Company’s New Season

first_img Nice Girl, written by Ross and directed by Mimi O’Donnell, will play in the spring of 2015. In suburban Massachusetts in 1984, 37 year-old Josephine Rosen has a dead end job, still lives with her mother, and has settled into the uncomfortable comfort of an unintended spinsterhood. But when a chance flirtation with an old classmate and a new friendship at work give her hope for the possibility of change, she dusts off the Jane Fonda tapes, and begins to take tentative steps towards a new life. The season will kick off in September with A Sucker Emcee, written and performed by muMs Grant, and directed by Jenny Koons. Infused with hip-hop, slam poetry and personal recollections, this one-man show charts the ups and downs of muMs’ journey, from growing up in the Bronx to starring on HBO’s Oz. A life set against the backdrop of the birth of hip-hop, this is the story of man looking for his spotlight and finding it in the most unlikely of places. View Comments Lear deBessonet will helm Thurber’s The Insurgents in early 2015. The play follows Sally Wright, an American wanderer, who has traveled across the country searching for something to believe in, only to find herself home again. Inspired by the lives of some of the most dynamic and controversial figures in American history, The Insurgents examines the lies and injustice that history has handed down to us and the actions people take when they finally decide that enough is enough. Craig muMs Grant’s A Sucker Emcee, along with Lucy Thurber’s The Insurgents and Melissa Ross’ Nice Girl, will all be presented as part of Labyrinth Theater Company’s 2014-15 season. The productions will play at off-Broadway’s Bank Street Theater.last_img read more

‘Bolivian Sunset’

‘Bolivian Sunset’

first_imgShady ground covers that bloom are sought-after in the gardening world, and ‘Bolivian Sunset’ is one of the most beautiful. The name itself conjures up visions of exotic colors.‘Bolivian Sunset,’ known botanically as “Seemannia sylvatica,” is native to Bolivia and Peru. It also has another common name, “hardy gloxinia.”This plant is cold hardy from zones 8 and higher, though everyone can enjoy it as a container plant to be enjoyed on the porch patio or deck and indoors, provided it has a shady or filtered-light location.In Savannah, Georgia, it always seems to be in bloom, but a journey through my photos shows that I have always photographed it starting in September. Now that it’s mid-October, it appears to be in its full glory.As a spreading ground cover in Savannah, our garden’s hardy gloxinia has spread outward and formed a clump about 8 feet wide and deep. The plants themselves reach 12 to 18 inches tall, and I would like it even if it never bloomed.The leaves are shaped like lances, leathery to the touch with a semigloss sheen. In a world of typically green leaves, the texture of this plant is much welcome in the garden. The flowers are dazzling. The tubular blossoms are a fiery orange-red with a yellow throat. They are produced in abundance on the multistemmed ground cover. The blooming commences in the fall — late August to September in Savannah — and will last until spring if not caught by frost. This is one reason why this is a sought-after houseplant.In the landscape, it may die back in zone 8 depending on the winter, then quickly grow back. It spreads by underground rhizomes, which makes me think that it may have opportunities for growth in protected areas of zone 7.Once you find yours, select a site with fertile, organic-rich soil that drains well. Ours is growing next to an old 1920s home that, though sandy, has had lots of organic amendments over the decades. Remember, however, the light requirements of morning sun and afternoon shade, or highly filtered light.When grown in containers, you’ll notice it quickly fills the pot with leaves, blooms and a very rhizomatous root system that may seem to have devoured your lush potting medium. This means that, as you choose to repot, you can make more plants to give away or use in other locations.In the landscape, it would partner extremely well with hostas and ferns for an absolutely lush and dreamy forest floor. We are growing ours in close proximity to shampoo gingers, or Zingiber zerumbet, and ‘Emperor’ hidden gingers for a tropical look.As you might expect, tubular flowers can bring in hummingbirds if they are still active in your area when the flowers begin blooming. Hanging baskets or containers that are off the ground are more suitable. Here at the Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, small bees and sulphur butterflies seem to be the most frequent visitors.Not many ground covers are as pretty as ‘Bolivian Sunset’ gloxinia. I hope you’ll give it a try in your landscape or in a container to beautify your home.Follow me on Twitter: @CGBGgardenguru. To learn more about the UGA Coastal Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm, visit coastalgeorgiabg.org.last_img read more

Rutland affordable housing project gets $175,000 for energy efficiency

Rutland affordable housing project gets $175,000 for energy efficiency

first_imgUS Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) today announced a $175,000 federal energy efficiency grant for a 17-unit affordable housing project in the historic St. Stanislaus School and Convent buildings. The project’s extraordinary energy-saving improvements could make it a national model.  While a typical weatherization project in Vermont can save 20 to 30 percent on energy consumption, the St. Stanislaus project will aim to reduce energy use for heating by 60 percent, and reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent or more. One result will be that energy costs at the St. Stanislaus project will be slashed by thousands of dollars every year.“I am very pleased that this grant will help the St. Stanislaus project set a new standard for energy efficient affordable housing,” Sanders said. There is little doubt in my mind that in the years to come the energy mix in this state will be very different than it is today.  This federal support will help move our state toward a greener economy.“At a time when many Vermonters are struggling economically, when affordable housing can be very hard to come by and when many low- and moderate-income people are spending 50 percent of more of their limited income on housing, this affordable housing project is sorely needed and I’m very excited to see it built in Rutland.” “Sen. Sanders is giving us an exciting challenge and a tremendous opportunity,” said Elisabeth Kulas, executive director of the Housing Trust of Rutland County. “We’ve been sensitive to energy improvements and the concept of renewal energy in our affordable housing development, having dabbled with solar hot water and spray foam insulation in the recent past. This grant is creating a pathway to implement the most advanced, yet proven, energy technologies. “Furthermore, and equally notable, pursuing this initiative in a project that is also meeting the National Park Services’ highest historic preservation standards  adds one more critical dimension and means this will serve as a poster child for historic preservation with energy efficiency and renewals technology for the rest of the country,” Kulas added.In order to achieve the energy efficiency goals, the project will increase roof and wall insulation and install high-efficiency lighting and appliances. It also will feature a wood pellet boiler, a solar hot water heater, triple-glazed windows, and an energy-saving ventilation system.In addition to the $175,000 grant that Sanders secured from the U.S. Department of Energy, the $4.6 million project also received $1.25 million from the federal stimulus package and significant funding from the Vermont Housing Conservation Board and other investors.The project will revitalize two long-abandoned historic buildings in West Rutland.  Both the school building and the convent which housed nuns who taught there are included on the state’s historic register and the National Register of Historic Places.Source: WEST RUTLAND, Vt. Oct. 27 – US Senator Bernie Sanderslast_img read more

Lawyers urged to get involved in court system funding debate

Lawyers urged to get involved in court system funding debate

first_img Lawyers urged to get involved in court system funding debate Eleventh Circuit Judge Joseph Farina spoke at the 2003 All Bar Conference on January 16 in Miami, inviting all lawyers to get involved in the court funding challenge that faces Florida:“I’m here on behalf of not only the chief judges of the state of Florida, chief judges of the trial courts, but also on behalf of Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead, who unfortunately cannot be here this morning, as he is in Tallahassee dealing with some court funding issues. In fact, that is why I am here this morning, as well. On behalf of the chief justice, on behalf of the chief judges of the trial courts of this state, we are asking for your help.“As you know in Tallahassee, there is a great deal of discussion regarding certain recent constitutional amendments, involving education primarily, and also involving the bullet train.“There is one that is very important and dear to our hearts, our hearts as attorneys, our hearts as community activists, and that has to do with the funding of the state courts system. Because all of you surely remember that four years ago, the state of Florida’s population agreed to amend Article V, through Revision 7, which calls for the shifting of funds from primarily a county-funded state court system to a state-funded court system. And there is a drop-dead date, and that is July 1, 2004.“Four years have gone by. The legislature has now determined that these last two years will be the opportunity to decide which court essential functions will be funded by the state and which will not. Through this Florida Bar, you have lent your expertise and support through the Board of Governors, and through your officers, in a Revision 7 communications committee effort, and we have developed a theme, which is ‘Justice for All Floridians.’“What I am asking, and what the chief justice is asking, is that you please call and contact your local chief judge of your local trial court system. He or she has an active program in reaching out to your local communities — in order to ask them, the civic leaders, the business leaders, the other leaders of your local communities, to reach your own local delegation to Tallahassee, to impress upon them the importance of fully funding the trial court system.“If that doesn’t happen, we as attorneys will lose an important forum for our profession; our clients will not have their day in court; and the public is not going to be properly served. So all of us have a stake in this. As bar leaders, you are great volunteers, otherwise you wouldn’t be here. And I have found over the years that people who volunteer for the bar association — whether The Florida Bar or the local bar association — volunteer everywhere else in the community. Eventually, your chief judge would like to work with you in going out into that community and asking those citizens in charitable and business groups to write on their letterhead, with their engraved seal (or embossed, in these difficult times), a letter to the local delegation asking them to support full and adequate trial court funding.“When you get back home, pick up the phone and make an appointment to see your local chief judge. He or she will be welcoming you, and you will help make a difference in the future of all Floridians.” Lawyers urged to get involved in court system funding debate February 1, 2003 Regular Newslast_img read more

How safe are you from overdraft lawsuits?

How safe are you from overdraft lawsuits?

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Just because you use a model form when asking members if they want to opt-in to overdraft protections, don’t assume that your credit union is safe from being sued over the adequacy of these disclosures. That is my takeaway from the latest case I have seen. It joins a growing body of litigation in which members are being allowed to sue credit unions for providing inadequate account balance disclosures which lead to unnecessary overdraft fees.First some background, with apologies to those of you who already know most of this. There are two basic methods for calculating account balances: the actual or ledger balance method refers to all money currently in a member’s account. In contrast, the available balance method refers only to those funds actually available for use by the member. A second key point to keep in mind is that 12 CFR 1005.17 stipulates that opt-in disclosures for overdraft protections shall be “substantially similar” to model form A9. My guess is, this is the form your credit union uses. The Electronic Funds Transfer Act shields credit unions from liability for any failure to make disclosures improper form provided that the model form is used. continue reading »last_img read more

Westbury Teen Killed in Crash

Westbury Teen Killed in Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 19-year-old man was killed when he crashed his vehicle in his hometown of Westbury over the weekend.Nassau County police said Quentin Abram was driving a Toyota southbound on Merrick Avenue at a high rate of speed when he crossed into the opposite lane of traffic and struck a tree at 8:35 a.m. Sunday.The victim was taken to a local hospital, where he died. He was driving alone.Third Squad detectives impounded the vehicle, found no apparent criminality and are continuing the investigation.last_img read more

Gov. Wolf: State Police Deserve Adequate Funding Without Impacting Resources for Infrastructure

Gov. Wolf: State Police Deserve Adequate Funding Without Impacting Resources for Infrastructure

first_imgGov. Wolf: State Police Deserve Adequate Funding Without Impacting Resources for Infrastructure Press Release,  Public Safety Harrisburg, PA – At a press conference with legislators and the Pennsylvania State Police (PSP), Governor Tom Wolf today called for support for legislation that will impose a fee to municipalities that do not have a local police department and rely solely on State Police for local police coverage.“We all want safe communities,” Gov. Wolf said. “That means adequate police protection and structurally sound roads and bridges. But right now, some municipalities are not paying their fair share for police protection, and to compensate for that deficit, money is being taken from the Motor License Fund that would otherwise go to our roads and bridges.”Rep. Mike Sturla’s House Bill 959 and Sen. Jay Costa’s Senate Bill 741 will correct that imbalance by requiring municipalities that rely on state police to chip in on the cost of coverage. The fee will help supplement the funding PSP will lose as the Motor License Fund draw-down is reduced by 4 percent annually until it is capped in 2027.“This fee is about fairness,” Rep. Sturla said. “While 80 percent of Pennsylvanians pay for their local police services, some with average incomes barely above poverty, 20 percent rely solely on the PSP. The PSP is using Motor License Fund dollars to help fund those patrols and everyone is missing out on road and bridge repair projects that would improve public safety for all. Charging a reasonable fee for the exemplary service the PSP provides will give them the resources needed to provide those services while preserving public safety.”“When local governments disbanded their police forces, our State troopers stepped in to do the work,” Sen. Costa said. “They upheld their oath to protect all of our citizens. The problem in this funding stream is not with our brave men and women who are officers. But they are doing a new job now, and we need a fair, guaranteed revenue for their expanded scope.”“Approximately 10 million taxpayers currently support their own municipal police through local taxes,” State Police Commissioner Col. Robert Evanchick said. “This proposal simply asks the municipalities that do not fund a police department to begin to share in the cost that their neighbors already shoulder. This proposal begins to close the looming budget gap and creates a framework for supporting public safety now and in the years to come.”House Bill 959 and Senate Bill 741 would assess a fee on municipalities where the State Police provides full-time local policing services. The fee would be assessed to the municipality on a per-capita basis according to the most recent decennial census population, excluding the institutionalized population in state Department of Corrections Institutions. Distressed municipalities and those in Act 47 status are exempt from paying the fee.The fee schedule is set on a sliding scale ranging from $8.00 per capita for a municipality with a population up to 2,000, to $166 per capita for municipalities with a population over 20,000.During its first year, the fee would raise an estimated $104 million for PSP operations, services and cadet classes. Any fee increases would occur annually, based on the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) for the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD area. If the CPI-U does not increase, neither would the fee.“I’m asking for support for House Bill 959 and Senate Bill 741, which will help ensure all communities are kept safe without taking anything away from the infrastructure we all share and need,” Gov Wolf said. “It’s time that all Pennsylvanians pay their fair share.” June 11, 2019center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Dutch library scheme grants indexation while reducing accrual

Dutch library scheme grants indexation while reducing accrual

first_imgThe €2bn Dutch sector scheme for public libraries said it has decided to grant its participants and pensioners an inflation compensation, while reducing its annual pensions accrual.According to its website, the Pensioenfonds Openbare Bibliotheken has raised existing pension rights by 1.1% as of 1 January, as its funding ratio of 113.6% at the end of November enabled the increase.It is the third consecutive year that the library scheme grants an indexation.However, it said it is reducing accrual from 1.738% to 1.4% for 2020, following an agreement between employers and trade unions about the minimum “premium funding”, which reflects how much of the current contribution covers new liabilities. The social partners had set a minimum level of 85% but, based on the low interest rates of September-end, the premium coverage was likely to drop to 69%, Margreet Teunissen, the scheme’s chair, pointed out.“This would be definitively too low and would undermine the pension fund’s financial position,” she said.During the past months, employers and trade unions had failed to reach an agreement on raising contributions, according to Teunissen.“Therefore, our only tool left was reducing pensions accrual,” said the chair, who emphasised that the scheme’s target remained 1.738%.In the past four years, the pension fund has charged a premium of 19.7% of the salary, with three-quarters of the contribution paid by the employers.Because of the current process of pensions reform, and pending a new collective labour agreement for the library sector, the social partners had agreed to extend the arrangement by another year.This year, the social partners and the pension fund will negotiate a new pension plan as well as a new contribution and accrual level.The Pensioenfonds Openbare Bibliotheken has close to 7,000 active participants.last_img read more

78-years later Pearl Harbor vet to be laid to rest

78-years later Pearl Harbor vet to be laid to rest

first_imgMadison, In. — Sixteen million Americans served in World War II, more than 400,000 died, more than 72,000 are still missing, now one Butler County Veteran has been accounted for and will be laid to rest.Navy Fireman 3rd Class Willard Lawson was 25-years-old when he was killed during the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor 78-years ago. Officials from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency say Lawson was positively identified last August and will be laid to rest in Madison, Indiana on Saturday.Lawson served on the battleship USS Oklahoma which was docked at Ford Island in Pearl Harbor when multiple torpedo strikes caused the vessel to capsize killing 429 sailors.The remains of the sailors were recovered between 1941 and 1944 and interned in a Hawaiian cemetery. In April of 2015, the U.S. Department of Defense began the disinterment and identification process. Scientists used DNA, dental and anthropological information to identify Lawson.last_img read more