Month: January 2021

Soler, Bell set tone for year

Soler, Bell set tone for year

first_imgBridget Bredemann commended Weber on “an above-and-beyond job,” and McCormick described Brellenthin as “a model of the servant leader.”  “As senators, you are the number one source for student government and organizations on campus to keep everyone informed,” Soler said. The initial meeting of the new Senate established committee chairs and introduced new members to their responsibilities. An executive order from Soler created a new committee to deal with off-campus concerns.  One of the committee’s goals is to “expand beyond just the bubble of Notre Dame,” LeStrange said. “The whole student body was able to feel like they got something from the administration under Grant,” Becker said. The senators approved all nominations for committee chair positions. The nominees outlined the mission of their committees and their plans for the upcoming year.  The agenda for the new committee includes continuing to improve the Transpo service for students, educating off-campus students about improving their relationships with their neighbors in the local community and arranging student discounts at off-campus restaurants. Gender Issues Committee chairs Mariah McGrogan and Tim Castellini plan to address issues of gender, sexual orientation and the development of gender resources.“The most important thing about this committee is trying to make [these issues] more accessible to the student body,” Castellini said. The Community Relations committee, chaired by Claire Sokas, plays an important role in the upcoming Communiversity Day, and Sokas said she hopes to work on similar projects to engage students with the South Bend community. Student body president Catherine Soler and vice president Andrew Bell, who took office on April 1, set the tone for the upcoming year’s administration and welcomed the new senators to student government as they led their first meeting of the Student Senate Wednesday. Soler, Bell and the senators swore to “preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the student body” as they officially assumed their positions.  Social Concerns Committee chair Patrick McCormick said his committee would be working on the hunger initiative that was included in Soler and Bell’s election platform. Other approved committee chairs include Mick Mulhall for Academic Affairs, Casey Cockerham for Campus Technology, Matt High for Residence Life, Chase Riddle for University Affairs, Brigitte Githinji for Multicultural Affairs and Paige Becker for Oversight.The student senators unanimously passed resolutions bestowing emeritus status on former student body president Grant Schmidt, former vice president Cynthia Weber and former chief of staff Ryan Brellenthin. Veteran members of student government voiced their support for last year’s administration.  The new committee will compile many of the off-campus projects, such as Transpo, that were handled by various committees during the last administration, Off-Campus Concerns Committee chair Emily LeStrange said. The new senators will soon be settled into the various committees and liaison positions to other groups around campus. last_img read more

SMC Straight and Gay Alliance hosts Ally Week

SMC Straight and Gay Alliance hosts Ally Week

first_imgSaint Mary’s College Straight And Gay Alliance (SAGA) showed appreciation for the allies of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community by hosting Ally Week, which began Monday. The second annual Ally Week was dedicated to the students who support members of the LGBT community and SAGA offered different events each day. The first Ally Week took place during the Spring 2010 semester at the College. The week offered students a chance to learn how to get involved and show their understanding for members of the LGBT community, Karen Borga, president of SAGA said. “It’s important to LGBT students because it’s support that they can see,” she said. “[They can see] that there are people on campus who care about them, who want to know that they are safe.” Additionally, Borja said Ally Week is a way for all students to come together and provide encouragement for their fellow students. “For straight students, it’s a way for them to show support, in maybe other ways that they haven’t been able to before, or might not know how to show that support,” she said. A table was set up in the Student Center Atrium on Monday offering students a chance to sign a pledge to become an ally. Over 150 students signed the pledge, which was displayed on a bulletin board outside of the Noble Family Dining Hall throughout the week. “For me, as a gay student, it’s for me to show appreciation for those who enabled me to come out.” Laurel Javors, a senior at the College said. Javors said Ally Week allows LGBT students to feel more comfortable on campus and express gratitude to those who are allies. “Without allies, I don’t think coming out for gay students is possible,” Javors said. Borja said another goal of Ally week was to educate women. On Tuesday, students were offered an open house for the Women’s Resource Room, a place designed as a safety space on campus. On Wednesday, discussion titled “I’m an Ally. I’m out too!” was held in the Student Center Lounge and included stories from a professor and student allies. Thursday SAGA presented “The Laramie Project.” For Friday, the final day of Ally week, SAGA encourages all allies to wear their pins, stickers and T-shirts that were distributed throughout the events of Ally Week, Borja said. Borja said SAGA plans to offer several other events throughout the academic year including National Coming Out Day on Oct. 11.last_img read more

Lecture analyzes border deaths

Lecture analyzes border deaths

first_imgDeath is a powerful and interesting thing, according to Lawrence Taylor, vice president of international affairs and professor of anthropology at the National University of Ireland. Taylor gave a lecture titled “Death in the Desert: Conflicting Moral Geographies on the U.S. Mexico Border” Monday at the Vander Vennett Theatre in the Saint Mary’s Student Center. Taylor said death is often used as an event to promote certain ideas to bring about change. In his lecture, Taylor discussed two such examples in which death encouraged new legislation pertaining to the U.S. Mexico border. The first event was the death of 14 people who were lost in the desert in an attempt to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in May 2001. “All you have to do is get lost, and that’s what happened,” he said. “These were people entering the United States without papers.” Taylor said an inexperienced smuggler was leading the immigrants, believed he saw the headlights of a border patrol car and led them off course. The second event Taylor discussed was the death of Kris Eggle, a U.S. park ranger who was killed in August 2002 while in pursuit of a Mexican hitman who had crossed the border to escape the Mexican police. “Park rangers in this part of the world are very often trained in enforcement,” he said. “The enforcement that they’re looking for is not somebody who is lighting illegal campfires, but drug smugglers.” According to Taylor, different groups involved in border issues used these deaths in an attempt to gain support for their causes. One such group was Humane Borders, an activist group that places water tanks in various locations in the desert so immigrants who cross the border do not die of thirst. A rival group, Taylor said, is the Minutemen, seeks better border patrol to prevent immigrants from entering the United States. Taylor said Humane Borders attempted to use the 14 deaths as a way to gain permission to make water tanks available in the desert. “With the 14 who died … a group of local activists, including some attorneys, who are pro-immigrant, decided to sue the Department of the Interior for the deaths,” he said. “The argument for that was that Humane Borders, had previous to the deaths by about a month, a month and a half, had gone to the … refuge people who directly control that, and asked for permission to put water tanks out, and were turned down.” According to Taylor, this tactic was unsuccessful in its attempt to gain support for the pro-immigrant cause. With the other death event, Taylor said Eggle’s parents visited the border and spoke with a number of anti-immigration groups. The story gained media attention, and eventually, legislation was passed to pay for a Kris Eggle Memorial Fence, which would be erected on the border. “Some people say ‘I now know or believe my child died for a purpose,’ and that purpose is often legislative,” he said.last_img read more

Students petition for light

Students petition for light

first_imgAfter senior Monica O’Hearn was hit by a car Wednesday night at the intersection of Twyckenham Road and Vaness Street, her roommate, senior Karen Allen, started a personal petition on behalf of O’Heam to install a stoplight. The petition has gathered more than half of the 300 signatures Allen set goal for. She plans to submit the signatures to the University when she reaches her goal O’Hearn said she thinks the accident could have been prevented if there were a stoplight there.             “I was biking to my apartment and had stopped at the crosswalk,” O’Hearn said. “The road has two lanes in each direction, and a car in the far lane had honked his horn for me to pass. I hadn’t noticed as I started to pedal that there was a car in the near lane, and when the driver and I realized what was about to happen, I pedaled faster and he hit the brakes, but the car still hit my bike.             “I was thrown off the road, but thankfully, my injuries are minor and I walked away with only bruises and cuts on my legs and sides.”             O’Hearn said she believes a stoplight at the intersection would remove these communication issues between drivers and pedestrians.             “If there were a stoplight, it would provide an opportunity for pedestrians and bikers like myself to cross safely, as well as clear doubt in drivers’ minds about whether stopping was necessary,” she said.             Senior Mary Jeanne Brenholts, one of the 163 signers of the petition, said the current situation at the intersection is not safe for pedestrians. The intersection, near the student housing at Irish Row and Clover Ridge, currently has a crosswalk light that alerts oncoming cars when people are crossing.             “When you’re crossing the street, you push a button and the yellow flashing lights come on,” Brenholts said. “Sometimes the lights are on and the drivers still don’t slow down, so every time you cross the street you’re not sure whether they’ll slow down this time or not.”             Brenholts said the problem is partially because drivers are unfamiliar with the meaning of the yellow lights.             “The lights come on right away when you push the buttons because the pedestrians do have the right of way, but drivers don’t always slow down for us,” she said.             Kevin Condit said he signed the petition because he thinks the area is at a “high risk” for pedestrian-automobile accidents, and he has seen too many close calls.             “I ride my bike through that intersection every day, so I’m familiar with it, and I see people go pretty fast through there,” Condit said. “I think a stop sign would be a good addition because it’s a high-traffic intersection.”             Both Brenholts and Condit said that they became aware of the petition through Facebook, and signed because of their personal connection to the area.             “I live off-campus in Clover Ridge, and I bike to campus because I don’t have a car,” Brenholts said. “Sometimes, it just doesn’t feel safe, and I know [O’Hearn’s accident] is the kind of thing that could have happened to anyone.”             Condit said he thinks that installing a stoplight is the best way to make students feel safer when passing through the area.             “The importance of this cause is definitely highlighted by the fact that someone got hit there,” Condit said. “Sometimes, it unfortunately takes an accident like that to show you just how important it is.”             O’Hearn said Allen contacted the Department of University Affairs in student government to see what can be done within the university, and the two are hoping to get the city of South Bend involved as well.             “We are looking into possibilities in South Bend, and hoping to use the petition as an indicator of student concerns.”             Students interested in accessing the petition can find it at http://www.change.org/petitions/university-of-notre-dame-put-a-stoplight-at-the-crosswalk-at-vaness-and-twyckenham.last_img read more

Fr. Hesburgh commemorated with U.S. ‘Forever’ stamp

Fr. Hesburgh commemorated with U.S. ‘Forever’ stamp

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice speaks at a ceremony unveiling University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh’s stamp on Friday in the Purcell Pavilion.“When we see that ‘God, country, Notre Dame’ — he lived it,” Phelps said. “God, yes — he was a priest his whole life. Country — and what he did with that civil rights act. Back then it was for African-Americans, but as we talk years later, it was for all cultures, all colors of skin and all religions coming into this country. And finally, you talk about ‘God, country, Notre Dame?’ He was president for 35 years, and what you see today was his vision to reality.”Of these three pillars, Jenkins said Hesburgh always identified most strongly with the first.“Fr. Ted often said the defining moment of his life, his most important calling, was his ordination as a priest,” he said. “He celebrated Mass every day, he loved the church [and] he preached the gospel, but he never saw his priesthood as devoted exclusively to those who were Roman Catholic.”Hesburgh thought of his mission as a priest as uniting people around the world, Jenkins said.“He would often point out that the ancient Latin word for priest is ‘pontifex’ — bridge builder,” Jenkins said. “As a priest, Fr. Ted devoted his life to building bridges. Bridges between people who were estranged, bridges between men and women and God, bridges between nations [and] bridges between faiths.”This mission, Brennan said, led Hesburgh to serve as a leader on a global scale.“Fr. Hesburgh was a leader on a broad stage,” she said. “He served the global community. He fought to advance humanitarian causes, to include the people who found themselves most marginalized. He worked to open the arms of civil society to the people who needed it most.”Hesburgh’s selection as the subject of a stamp is not only the University’s proudest connection with the Postal Service, Jenkins said, but also something Hesburgh would be proud of.“Notre Dame has a long, proud history with the postal service, but we were never prouder than we are today,” he said. “Thousands — if not tens of thousands — of worthy candidates are submitted each year to the postal service to be considered for the honor accorded Fr. Hesburgh. … Fr. Ted was proud of this nation. He loved it, and he spent endless hours in service to it, to make it a better place. He would be so tremendously proud that the United States has given him the tremendous honor of recognizing him on this stamp.”Hesburgh’s years of impactful service and his lasting legacy regarding female education made him the best candidate for a stamp, Brennan, the first female to hold her position, said.“Popes and presidents called on Fr. Hesburgh to be their voice and to provide leadership on the tough issues facing peoples and governments,” she said. “ … We also honor him because his legacy of service to humanity is still felt today in so many ways. Fr. Hesburgh was a leading national voice for equality in education, and because he led Notre Dame’s transition to coeducation, many other universities and colleges followed suit. Those opportunities for millions of women weren’t as available just a generation prior. It’s hard to believe today that this had to be fought for, but it did.”Of all Hesburgh’s accomplishments as President of the University, Phelps said, integrating women into the Notre Dame community was the one of which he was proudest.“ … One time when I was with him, and I said to him, ‘What is your greatest accomplishment while you were here as president for 35 years?’ he said, ‘When we went coed,” Phelps said.One of the beneficiaries of Hesburgh’s work to integrate Notre Dame was 66th Secretary of State of the United States Condoleezza Rice, who graduated from the University’s graduate program in 1975. Rice said Hesburgh was a “transformational figure” in the world and at Notre Dame.“ … Fr. Ted transformed students’ lives because he cared so much for them,” she said. “When you’d walk across this campus and there was a light in the administration building at the top of the Golden Dome, people would say, ‘Fr. Ted’s working late tonight.’ That’s how the students thought of him. And it wasn’t just the generation of students that knew him. When I was here for his memorial service, more than a year ago, I was told of the students that lined the way for his funeral bier — students who had never known him, but to them, too, he was Fr. Ted.”Perhaps more than Hesburgh’s ability to be transformational, Rice said, is his transcendence.“And today it is not just his transformational character that we celebrate,” Rice said. “We celebrate his transcendence. For more than a century and a half, the U.S. postal service has honored Americans who are transcendent,” she said. “Americans who transcended the places they were born, the titles that they held, the work that they did, transcended the time in which they lived to be a part of a timeless transmission of the values that we so admire. Values of faith, and justice, and belief in equality and not just the ability to tolerate those who are different, but to really admire and embrace them. That transcendence is also a part of Fr. Hesburgh’s heritage because it is who we was. When you looked at him you knew that this was a very special man.”People will be able to notice this quality when they look at the new stamp, Brennan said.“You’ll see a likeness that exudes the warmth and openness Fr. Hesburgh was known for,” Brennan said. “The smile is subtle and the eyes are fixed ahead, capturing his benevolence and his determination. You’ll notice the words on the stamp — it reads, ‘Fr. Ted Hesburgh.’ This isn’t his formal given name. It’s the name he preferred. It’s the one given to him by the community he served. You’ll also notice the words ‘Forever’ and ‘USA.’ That’s our way of saying Fr. Hesburgh represents the very best of America, and will do so always.”Jenkins said everyone should try to emulate this ideal representation of America in the midst of a divisive political climate.“We face many challenges to day in our nation,” he said. “There are deep divisions. There unfortunately are dark forces at work — racists, anti-semitic and hateful chants, violent clashes. I think if there’s one thing Fr. Ted would say to us today it would be this: ‘Let us all be bridge builders. Let us work for justice, let us yearn for true peace.’ And as we consider his image on this stamp, let it call each of us to that.”Hesburgh’s visions for Notre Dame and the world, Rice said, will be immortalized not only by this stamp, but also by the people he affected.“ … Fr. Ted is someone who didn’t just see the world as it is. He saw the world as it should be,” she said. “And that transcendent message will live on in this stamp as it lives on in the lives of those that he transformed in this wonderful, wonderful community of Notre Dame.”Tags: commemorative stamp, Fr. Ted Hesburgh, legacy, stamp, U.S. Postal Service After he stamped his place in the history books of both Notre Dame and the U.S. through years of service to the University and his country, the U.S. Postal Service honored University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh with a 49-cent Forever stamp bearing his image.The Postal Service unveiled the stamp at a ceremony celebrating Hesburgh on Friday in the Purcell Pavilion with speakers including University President Fr. John Jenkins, Postmaster General of the U. S. Postal Service Megan Brennan and former Secretary of State and Notre Dame alumna Condoleezza Rice.Hesburgh, the longest-tenured University president with 35 years in the position, served four popes and nine American presidents, was the first priest to be appointed a United States ambassador and was awarded the Medal of Freedom and Congressional Gold Medal, according to a video remembering Hesburgh’s legacy that was shown during the ceremony.“It’s a privilege to celebrate and commemorate the life of Fr. Hesburgh,” Brennan said. “To an organization like the Postal Service, which is dedicated to public service, Fr. Hesburgh epitomizes the ideal of service to others, to community and country. … Today we are honoring a man who believed strongly and acted courageously and righteously for worthy causes, for equality, civil rights, compassion, virtues and community.”Former men’s basketball coach Digger Phelps, the emcee of the event — who served as a member of the citizen’s stamp advisory committee for 22 years — said Hesburgh was emblematic of the words displayed above the entrance to the Basilica of the Sacred Heart: God, Country, Notre Dame.last_img read more

Zahm House rector explores history, traditions of dorm

Zahm House rector explores history, traditions of dorm

first_imgEditor’s note: This article is one in a series profiling the dorms. Previous articles have covered dorms built before Zahm House.Built in 1937, Zahm House is hailed by its residents as the one of the most tightly-knit communities on campus.The dorm is named after Fr. John Zahm, a Notre Dame graduate, researcher and Notre Dame vice president. Among the 180 students who live there, the residential hall is affectionately called Zahm House rather than by its official name of Zahm Hall.“In the official books for Notre Dame, it’s Zahm Hall,” Fr. Matt Hovde, the rector of Zahm Hall, said. “The guys who live here will call it because of the familial sense they’re trying to cultivate. … This is actually supposed to be a brotherhood. The sense of the familial community here that guys are really trying to claim ownership of [is] more than a place that they pass through.”During World War II, when the University was facing a lack of students and a lack of funding, Zahm functioned as a barracks for the Naval Academy. The residence hall was reserved exclusively for naval officers. When the war ended, however, the building returned to housing Notre Dame students.Zahm tradition holds that the dorm formed its identity back when students were allowed to choose their residence halls on a yearly basis, based on their grades. Zahm was among the least desirable, the story says, so it housed those with lower grades, thus garnering a reputation as a more carefree dorm.“I don’t think [the story] is actually true, but it is propagated out there,” Hovde said. “It was one of the newer ones, so it doesn’t quite fit.”The Zahm mascot is a moose, though the various interhall teams sport different names, including “Zahm-bies,” the Rabbit Bats, Fear and Pain. According to Zahm tradition, the mascot came to be associated with Zahm after two students asked to take it from the trash of a Canadian ski lodge set to go out of business.“So [the students] couldn’t go skiing, but they did come back with a moose head, and they hung it up in the basement and it’s been there ever since,” Hovde said.Community service is the focus of Zahm House’s signature events: every fall the men of Zahm host a Halloween party for children with chronic illness, and every spring they plan and execute a carnival for the students and families at the Robinson Community Learning Center, a community learning center located in South Bend. Many Zahm residents volunteer at the center throughout the year and develop relationships with the staff, Hovde said.“We realized two years ago that we did nothing for students, so last year and the year before … we’re looking at Zahm-A-Palooza for an event, which is basically those things we do for the students in South Bend but available for Notre Dame students,” Hovde said.For Hovde, the best part about being the rector of Zahm is the students and the community they cultivate within the hall.“I think any rector would say [the best part] is the students,” Hovde said. “They want to do stuff with each other, and I think it’s really laudable that they want to celebrate each other. I think [they] deal with a little bit of a stigma being in Zahm, but I think it’s something that contributes to the closeness that guys get here. They wear a little bit of a badge of pride … My role as rector isn’t ever trying to create a sense of community, but to prune it [and] to cultivate what they are already doing … I’m a fan of Zahm.”Tags: dorm features, Zahm Houselast_img read more

Church leaders deliver lectures on preferential option for the poor

Church leaders deliver lectures on preferential option for the poor

first_imgCatholic leaders Cardinal Charles Maung Bo and Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez urged the Church for a greater devotion to the poor in the Center for Social Concerns’ 2019 Catholic Social Tradition conference, titled “Engaging Social Tradition: Option for the Poor.”The seminar, which took place from Thursday to Saturday, hosted a number of presentations, lectures and panels on the topic of the preferential option for the poor — a modern principle of Catholic theology based on advocacy for the marginalized.In a lecture Friday evening in McKenna Hall, Bo, the first-ever cardinal of Myanmar, called for the Church to remember the needs of the poor in Myanmar and similar impoverished countries.Catholicism was first brought to the country by Jesuit missionaries in the ’50s, he said. In 1962, however, a coup d’etat ushered in an era of martial law that would last nearly half a century. During this time, non-Buddhist minority groups, including the Catholic Church, endured intense persecution from the state.“In 1962, we lost everything, and [the] myopic socialist regime expelled the missionaries,” he said. “All our resources were challenged.”Catholicism in Myanmar nevertheless continued to grow, increasing from around 300,000 in the ’60s to about 700,000 today. Still, Bo said, the Church there is struggling. Despite being rich with natural resources, 75 percent of Myanmar lives below the poverty line; hunger, disease and violence run rampant, with ethnic minorities being the most vulnerable.“As we walk through Lent, I often feel the life of the people of Myanmar is the way of the Cross,” Bo said. Though they have much to offer, Bo said he feels wealthy nations have turned their backs on Myanmar’s poor.“Pope Francis called this a ‘globalization of indifference,’” he said. “The problem today is not ‘fake news,’ but the fragmented discourses about human suffering — [a] total hijacking of the discourse of the poor men’s and women’s tears and brokenness is the sad reality of this era.”Bo said the heavy hand of Myanmar’s corrupt government and a lack of humanitarian aid from abroad has crippled the country.“Brothers and sisters, poverty is not natural as rain or snow. Poverty is a manmade disaster,” he said. “People are made poor, kept poor — poverty is the modern sin of the modern times.”Though theological scholars have written about the preferential option for the poor since ’70s, Bo said the poor demand the doctrine’s teachings be implemented.“For every man of faith, option of the poor is not an option but a mandate from Jesus himself,” he said. “The poor are always with us, as Jesus said. We have no alternative. We are poor, powerless and align ourselves with the most powerless and those thrown out of their society.”Gutierrez, who helped found liberation theology — a modern Christian doctrine which upholds social, economic and political freedom for the oppressed — delivered a lecture in McKenna Hall on Saturday. Speaking via translator, Gutierrez called for the Church to make charity the bedrock of its faith.“Salvation is understood sometimes as trying to save oneself. And then our option for the poor — you know, almsgiving and helping people in need — is understood as a way to save [oneself],” he said. “We need to think about being christians as something way more than that.” The Church must also acknowledge poverty extends beyond monetary privation, he said.“We need to go beyond the understanding of poverty that thinks about it in terms of lack of economic means, lack of money,” Gutierrez said. “It’s way more than that. It’s about despising people, it’s about racism, it’s about just despising those who are not like [us]. Overall, when we think about the poor we need to understand it in terms of those who are seen as not being human.”Echoing Bo, Gutierrez said poverty has, in part, global inaction to blame.“Poverty was [once] considered to be an unfortunate situation and given,” he said. “We need to continue asking the greater question about this fixed position and the idea that poverty is not a given situation but a caused situation.”Intrinsic to the option of the poor is the understanding that God is close to those who help the suffering, Gutierrez said.“This is the heart of the Bible. This is the Bible,” he said. “Of course, there are many nuances we should add, there are many ways to resemble the closeness that God has for the poor and hungry, but the key point is that this is the core of the Bible.”Tags: Catholic Social Teaching, Center for Social Concerns, liberation theology, Myanmar, poverty, Preferential Option for the Poor, Religious Discriminationlast_img read more

Donations Sought For Family Who Lost Home In Fire

Donations Sought For Family Who Lost Home In Fire

first_imgImage via Falconer Fire Department / Facebook.FALCONER – A GoFundMe page is seeking to raise money for a Village of Falconer family who lost their home in a fire over the weekend.Image via Falconer Fire Department / Facebook.The Falconer Fire Department says on Sunday, just after 2:30 a.m., crews responded a house fire at 217 E. Pearl St.When firefighters first arrived on scene heavy smoke and flames were spotted coming from the second story of the single-family home.The family is now asking for the community’s help. They are seeking donations of clothing for their three-year-old daughter with toddler sizes of T3 and T4. They are also asking for women’s clothing sizes; small shirts, size 8 shoes, size 4 pants and size small/medium scrubs.Donations can be dropped off to the Falconer Fire Department at 6 p.m. Monday night. Monetary donations can also be made to a GoFundMe page. So far, the GoFundMe has raised over $2,000.The cause of the fire is currently under investigation. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Here We Go Again! Alan Campbell & More Begin Performances in Mamma Mia!

Here We Go Again! Alan Campbell & More Begin Performances in Mamma Mia!

first_imgMamma Mia! here we go again and how could we resist them? Five new stars are joining the cast of the hit Broadway show February 3 at the Broadhurst Theatre. Tony nominee Alan Campbell, Paul DeBoy and John Hemphill will begin performances as prospective papas Sam Carmichael, Harry Bright and Bill Austin respectively. Meanwhile Elena Ricardo and Jon Jorgenson will take on the roles of young lovers Sophie Sheridan and Sky. The new cast members replace current stars Aaron Lazar as Sam, Graham Rowat as Harry, Daniel Cooney as Bill, Laurie Veldheer as Sophie and Zak Resnick as Sky. Campbell garnered a Tony nomination for Sunset Boulevard and also appeared on Broadway in Contact.  DeBoy makes his Broadway debut in Mamma Mia! after playing Harry in the musical’s national tour. Hemphill previously played Sam Carmichael in the Broadway cast of Mamma Mia! Jorgenson makes his Broadway debut in the ABBA tuner after recently graduating from Carnegie Mellon University. After making her Broadway debut in the ensemble, Ricardo also appeared in the Mamma Mia! national tour. The new stars will be joining Judy McLane as Donna Sheridan, Felicia Finley as Tanya, Lauren Cohn as Rosie, Jacob Pinion as Pepper, Thomasina E. Gross as Lisa, Traci Victoria as Ali and Albert Guerzon as Eddie. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 12, 2015 View Comments Mamma Mia! last_img read more

Darren Criss Stars in ‘Already Home’ Music Video by A Great Big World

Darren Criss Stars in ‘Already Home’ Music Video by A Great Big World

first_imgLong distance relationships can be tough, but when you’re that far away from Darren Criss? The agony! The Broadway alum and Glee cutie stars opposite Gossip Girl’s Jessica Szohr in the new music video for “Already Home” by A Great Big World (a duo consisting of Ian Axel and Chad Vaccarino). The tune tells the story of a couple trying to make a long distance relationship work when on opposite coasts. Take a look at the split screen-laden music video featuring Criss below!  Darren Criss Star Filescenter_img View Commentslast_img read more