Month: April 2021

Tromp Bakery Systems

Tromp Bakery Systems

first_imgHereford-based Tromp Bakery Systems (TBS) has brought together industrial bakery and food processing equipment from its five specialist European manufacturers to customers in the UK and Irish bakery industries.The company offers direct and indirect fired tunnel ovens from VDP Baking Systems. They feature internal insulation, off-the-floor construction, safety management and a multi-functional touchscreen control panel. The firm’s direct fired tunnel ovens use natural or propane gas, with independent top and bottom heat, an automatic combustion system and accurate temperature control. Each baking zone is divided into sub-zones with their own temperature sensors.VDP indirect fired tunnel ovens operate to the cyclothermic principle with low-maintenance modulating burners in round heating tubes with a large surface area, adjustable valves controlling top and bottom heat and a choice of natural gas, propane or oil as the heating medium. The baking conveyor can be made of wire mesh, chain, steel, stone or plates according to the product.Waffle ovens are also available with a capacity of up to 10,000 products an hour over a 60-minute baking time. Hard or soft dough waffles are transported through the direct fired oven in indented plates mounted on a solid base frame. Applications such as filling with syrup, trimming to size, cutting in half and cooling can be done in-line using VDP processing systems.In the UK, TBS offers local engineering and after-saleslast_img read more

Meetings leave doubt over Inter Link’s debts

Meetings leave doubt over Inter Link’s debts

first_imgThere was mounting concern this week among the creditors of the now-defunct Inter Link Foods as it emerged that they might not have their debts met in full by new owner McCambridge Food Group.The Irish baker, which bought Inter Link moments after it went into administration on Friday, held a succession of one-to-one meetings with suppliers earlier this week, which revealed that some of the £10 million sitting on suppliers’ books might have to be written off.One, who described himself as a ’substantial creditor’ phoned to voice his concerns to British Baker. He commented: “We thought we were okay when we got the phone call on Friday. We went up to see the new people, only to be told that they didn’t buy the debt. They expect us to continue to supply them.”Another major supplier said that it had been trying to contact senior management at McCambridge since hearing that the deal had gone through but had not received any communication from either the company or the administrators.British Baker understands that while shareholders stood to make nothing from the £63 million-plus deal – most of which went to writing off bank borrowing – suppliers thought they would not lose out.Inter Link dwarfs McCambridge’s previous turnover of £32 million by some £100 million and increases its workforce from 1,000 to 2,700. Chief executive Michael McCambridge agreed it was a case of a minnow swallowing a whale, but he declined to comment on transactional details or how Inter Link, which had been driven to administration by distribution problems and poor margins, would be brought back into profit. In a statement, the company said savings would not be made through the workforce, at least 90% of whom would be retained.Despite seven years of steady acquisition in the UK and Ireland, which has swelled its portfolio of food companies by nine, McCambridge has maintained a low profile. The purchase of Inter Link, which brings with it 11 manufacturing sites, including its first European base in Poland, propels it on to the world stage.Former Inter Link chairman Jeremy Hamer who, with fellow directors Ian Croxford and Colin Davies, has resigned, said: ” A lot of what we were doing has got to be right for them. You have to operate efficiently, buy as well as possible and maximise sale price.”He declined to comment on details of the sale.last_img read more

The genius of Dr Allinson

The genius of Dr Allinson

first_imgWhen it comes to giving up cigarettes, forget your nicotine patches, inhalers, self-help books, hypnotism, therapy, rehab, acupuncture, homeopathy, blah blah blah. Don’t be such a wuss – scratch out a week from the diary, lock the bedroom door, brace yourself and go cold turkey. It’s that simple. On quitting smoking: “The best way to stop this injurious habit is to give it up suddenly. There will be a great craving and a feeling as if something were lost for four or five days, then the natural man will predominate, and health and comfort will be gradually restored.”Next week: nerveslast_img read more

Ganache panache

Ganache panache

first_imgSacher torte originated in Austria in 1832, and is a rich chocolate cake, flavoured with rum. We use it as our staple chocolate celebration cake.IngredientsChocolate ganacheChocolate spongeRum flavoured syrupChocolate glazeMethod1. Carefully cut sponges into level slices of about 1cm thick. You need three layers for each torte. Prepare rum syrup and ganache (whipping cream consistency). Pic A2. Place 1st layer on to card and sprinkle generously and EVENLY with syrup. B3. Measure out ganache and spread evenly – slightly more on edges than in the centre. The ganache should be about 4mm thick. C4. Carefully place on next layer. Make sure it is DIRECTLY above the previous layer, and it is as level as possible. Soak evenly with syrup. D5. Repeat steps 3 and 4. Take care tokeep checking that the top layer is as level as possible and that the sides are true. This makes masking and glazing the cake much easier. E6. Soak the top layer. FMasking and Glazing1. Warm the ganache to consistency of lightly whipped cream. Take the torte in hand and apply ganache liberally to edges with palette knife. G2. Place the torte on a worktop and spread the top generously with ganache. Remove the excess by holding a knife at a 45-degree angle to the torte and smoothing backwards and forwards so that the surface is completely level. H3. Take the torte in hand and remove excess from the edges. I4. You should now have a perfect disc of cake. Leave to cool in the fridge.5. Warm the glaze and pour over cool torte, remove excess with palette knife. J6. When set, take more glaze and drizzle lines, about 2mm thick, across the surface. KTop tip: sometimes a layer of apricot jam may be added to the surface of each layer of sponge. We personalise ours with plaques and figures for an instant birthday cake. Llast_img read more

UBUK back to flavour

UBUK back to flavour

first_imgUnited Biscuits (UBUK) has relaunched a 300g pack of its limited-edition McVitie’s Milk Chocolate and Orange Digestives.”Chocolate and orange is a popular flavour combination that appeals to younger consumers, but we are also looking to keep loyal McVitie’s consumers interested,” said Nick Stuart, UBUK commercial manager.MRRP: £1.26www.unitedbiscuits.comlast_img

Muffin visits Black Forest

Muffin visits Black Forest

first_imgForecourt-based café Wild Bean is introducing a Black Forest Muffin to its offering this month. It has been developed exclusively for the café and will only be available for two months in BP Connect petrol stations. The chocolate muffin is flecked with black cherry pieces and milk and dark chocolate chunks. There is also a cherry filling in the centre of the muffin, which is dusted with icing sugar.It is being marketed as a seasonal product for autumn. “It will only be on the shelves for a short time, as we like to change our muffins with the seasons and keep our range fresh for our customers,” commented BP spokesman Mark Salt.Price: £1.39www.wildbeancafe.comlast_img read more

Tree House Bakery slammed by HSE

Tree House Bakery slammed by HSE

first_imgThe Tree House Bakery set up in Solihull, West Midlands, which has proved a major attraction for adults and kids, has been slammed a ‘dangerous’ by health and safety officials, and threatened with closure.The bakery set up by Sylva Burch and her husband, who come from Cyprus, is just six feet off the ground on wooden stilts. But as well as steps, access is via a rope ladder which has proved very popular with local children keen to try out their climbing skills – not always accompanied by an adult. Local schools meanwhile are taking classes of schoolchildren to visit the shop where Mr Burch is happy to take the children through the history of Hot Cross Buns. Anyone buying twelve, can get one free.“We wanted a bakers shop that was different,” said Mr Burch. But HSE officials said it was easy to get a leg tangled in the rope resulting in serious injuries. “This is completely foolhardy,” said the HSE’s Mr Ash. We have already received serious complaints from parents and two reports of twisted ankles. “Whichever company has insured Mr and Mrs Burch may not know the full facts about its precise location. We are investigating.”last_img read more

Cupcake Champion reveals all

Cupcake Champion reveals all

first_imgBritish Baker’s Andrew Williams speaks to the newly crowned Cupcake Champion of Great Britain 2010 – David Bennett of the six-month-old Sunshine Bakery in Chapel Allerton, Leeds – and discovers the secrets to his success.Andrew Williams: What was your inspiration? The judges noted that your cake was more refreshing and less sweet than a lot of your competitors.David Bennett: “What most people do when they come to cupcakes is immediately think Magnolia, Hummingbird, Primrose Bakery and all the rest of them. I came from a different angle, away from the old Victoria sponge method. Why can’t the toppings and sponges be lighter? It only takes one person to turn the corner and that’s how things evolve. That’s why I think I get a lot of repeat custom. People who say ‘I don’t really like cupcakes’ come back and say ‘wow, it was completely different to the ones I had before’. It is lighter and it has a lot less sugar in there.”AW: What methods did you use?DB: “I took a technique Iearned working in London restaurants for making a passionfruit sponge with 400ml of fruit juice. You can change that recipe to use any juice at all and that’s how I standardised the recipes here. If you use the Victoria sponge method you can’t put liquid into it – it splits. You can add milk but not a fruit juice – it won’t work. The same with buttercream – it splits – so people generally put essential oils into them. But essential oil is not the actual flavour of the fruit. What I do is make ganaches for the topping using 50/50 chocolate and cream, taking part of the cream out and substituting fruit juice for fruit puree. That way you can get the flavour of the fruit into the topping.“The cake is made using a genoese method – whisking the eggs and the sugar and then fold in ground almonds and some flour. Because the ground almonds are oily, they won’t soak up all the liquid, so you end up with quite a moist sponge. If you just used flour, it would take on board that liquid and you’d end up with a much drier texture. I caramelised muscovado sugar with butter and banana in a pan to make a buerre noisette, which is blitzed and used in the topping and cake.”AW: What attracted you to cupcake baking?DB: “Cupcakes came along and I thought the spectrum is so vast, for both the base and the topping, that it opens up a whole new window of creativity. And that’s what attracted me to them. I thought wow, you can have so much fun with these, there’s no limit to what you can actually do with them.”AW: How did you find making the transition from being a pastry chef to a baker, which are very different jobs?DB: “When you’re a pastry chef there’s only so far you can go before you hit the plateau at the top, and it’s all sideways from that moment on. You never get the chance to be the head chef. The natural progression is to get a shop. I’m French trained, and I was getting a bit jaded with it because I’d been doing it for 17 years. It’s the same old stuff – basically, you’re just refining recipes. “I’d been working in posh restaurants. You’d open the door and you’d see a sea of suits. I got to thinking one day – and all the local bakeries had shut down where I used to live – and I thought ‘why are all these working class lads in these top restaurants cooking for suits and rich people when our high streets are full of crap’?”AW: Why set up a cupcakery in Leeds?DB: “It’s just a great job, time consuming, but I absolutely love it. It keeps you happy. You can’t be sad smelling beautiful things all day. The bakery has been very well supported locally. Leeds in general has supported me. A lot of the radio stations, the local magazines and businesses have backed me, which is fantastic. I’m not a businessman, I’m a baker. I think it was apparent when I opened that I didn’t know what I was doing! They all came and held my hand all the way through it. Leeds has a great spirit.”AW: What do you think are people’s perceptions of chefs compared with bakers?DB: “Chefs have a higher profile than bakers but I’ve got as much admiration for Dan Lepard and Eric Lanlard as I have for Marco Pierre White. Dan Lepard is a total legend and is one of the people I idolise. The chef thing is out of control. I didn’t sign up to it to be on TV and in magazines. I did it because I love baking.”AW: Being crowned Britain’s Cupcake Champion 2010 will certainly raise your profile. How will it affect your business?DB: “Massively. It will save it. We’re close to break even and this will push it over the edge. It’s like a vindication because I could have gone down that Magnolia Bakery buttercream route, but I thought no, I’m going to carve my own way here. Hopefully people will look at what I do and think, “well, buttercream is heavy”. Never dress your food up so it looks magnificent but tastes awful, because it’s a lie. The most fundamental thing is the taste. What it looks like comes second.”>>> Click National Cupcake Week or see @CupcakeWeek on Twitter or our Facebook page for more.last_img read more

Equality Bill – some late changes

Equality Bill – some late changes

first_img1. Pregnant women: pregnancy becomes a protected characteristic in its own right (similar to age, disability etc) instead of being lumped in with sex. If the Bill is passed, it will be directly discriminatory to treat a woman unfavourably because of her pregnancy, pregnancy-related illness or absence on maternity leave during the “protected period”. This period starts when the pregnancy begins and ends either when she returns to work at the end of her maternity leave period or two weeks after giving birth.During the protected period, pregnancy and maternity discrimination would no longer be treated as indirect sex discrimination so men who receive less favourable treatment than a woman who receives special treatment in connection with her pregnancy or childbirth will not be able to bring a discrimination claim.This provision reflects the amendments set out in the Sex Discrimination Act (Amendment Regulations) 2008, although the Bill requires pregnant women and women on maternity leave who are discriminated against to show that they have been treated less favourably “than is reasonable”.2. Maternity leave: the Bill also introduces a maternity equality clause dealing with the pay that women receive on maternity leave and a maternity equality rule for occupational pension schemes. These provisions are separate and distinct from the right not to be discriminated against because of pregnancy or maternity, so complaints regarding discriminatory contractual provisions would be dealt with under these clauses, rather than as a form of pregnancy, maternity or gender discrimination.3. ’Dual discrimination’: this is a new clause that was inserted to allow anyone directly discriminated against because of a combination of two protected characteristics to make one claim. So, for example, a black woman discriminated against because her employer had a stereotyped attitude towards black women as opposed to black men or white women may bring a single claim for combined race and sex discrimination.The Equality Bill will now go to the report stage when MPs get the chance to debate and propose amendments. Most of the Bill should come into force by the autumn. as a matter of fact… The Equality Bill has two main purposes to harmonise discrimination law, and to strengthen the law to support progress on equality.last_img read more

In Short

In Short

first_imgName badge impactBakeries that introduce name badges for their staff see customer satisfaction ratings increase by an average of 12%, according to research from mystery shopping company Shopper Anonymous. The figure came from a study of 116,000 mystery shopper reports in the UK, New Zealand and Australia, including UK bakery shops such as Forfars, Cavendish and Truffles.Italian firm expands Italian coffee chain La Bottega Del Caffè has opened a store in Regent Street, London, as it looks to expand in the UK. The chain arrived in the UK in July this year and sells a range of baked goods, including freshly filled croissants, muffins and sandwiches.Healthy baking event Campden BRI is hosting a seminar on baking for a healthier diet on 7 December. It will cover some of the latest offerings from ingredients suppliers to address the needs of product developers, together with some cutting-edge food and nutrition science. To find out more contact Daphne Llewellyn Davies on email [email protected] or tel 01386 842040.Got an answer? An expatriate living in Australia has got in touch with British Baker to see if any bakers have a recipe for pineapple cream tarts, as she remembers getting them in Starkey’s Bakers when she was growing up in Birmingham. If any bakers can help, please send the recipe to [email protected] profile Cartoon characters Wallace and Gromit are to feature on a new selection of Christmas stamps from the Royal Mail. The collection includes a stamp of Gromit struggling to carry a large Christmas pudding.last_img read more