Month: June 2021

Lions 2013 squad options: No 8

Lions 2013 squad options: No 8

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LONDON, ENGLAND – APRIL 07: Nick Easter of Quins is hauled down by Conor Murray and Casey Laulala of Munster during the Heineken Cup quarter final match between Harlequins and Munster at The Twickenham Stoop on April 7, 2013 in London, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Point to prove: Ireland captain Jamie Heaslip will tour with the Lions, but he must show he is a Test optionBy Alan DymockIN THE aftermath of the Six Nations and with time running out we are all confronted with the starkest of choices: who are our Lions?An obvious point of conjecture, there were at least some standouts in recent weeks. So in the interest of making clear what Warren Gatland, Graham Rowntree, Rob Howley and Andy Farrell face before the squad announcement on 30 April, Rugby World will sift through the runners and riders in each key position.Unrelenting: Toby Faletau keeps rumbling on against ItalyWith the No 8s, though, there is the potential for Gatland to be harangued by fans for whatever choices he makes because there are so few options out there.Toby Faletau was the undoubted home nations standout during the Six Nations, playing muscular rugby at the tail of the Welsh scrum. He carried strongly and could hound ball-carriers if his game remit was to defend. He had and does have the ability to play several game-types and he is in international form, even if he is bailing out water with the Dragons. He also, and for some this is very important, has a history of playing well against Australia. However, in the other clear options there is not a sense that such mass box-ticking is going on.Ireland’s Jamie Heaslip struggled like a bug in a bathtub after being handed the country’s captaincy. He just could not keep a foothold and every time he moved forward something minor would cause him to slip back again. Chances are he will tour, but a thunderous surge of self-belief will be needed to push him to Test contention. Leinster’s assault on the Amlin Challenge Cup and RaboDirect Pro12 could help. Beyond this pair, it is slim pickings. Ben Morgan has his fans, but while he can be lifted with Gloucester and has moments of defence-shredding brilliance in an England shirt he can fade out of games. The same could be said of Scotland’s Johnnie Beattie, who has shone amongst Montpellier’s harem of ball-runners and looked good as a counter-attacker during the Six Nations, but who faces daily questions about his ability to play the tight game.Uphill struggle: embattled Nick Easter carriesBoth men represent gambles for Gatland and it could take an impressive domestic display for one to edge ahead of the other.Elsewhere, the campaign for left-field choices is dying down. Nick Easter and David Denton had featured in some discussion, but as the season has raged on –with Harlequins hitting a skiddy patch and Edinburgh playing terribly, as well as Denton juggling balls for Scotland – the trumpeting has been muffled. The one mouse-squeak that will not disappear is from those asking if Australia-based Gareth Delve, captain of the Melbourne Rebels, should be included. Perhaps, though, in the interest of keeping things close-knit, versatile utility breakaways like Tom Croft and Tom Wood could be the back-up plan.This is one area where Gatland may get creative.last_img read more

Autumn international player analysis: Sonny Bill Williams, New Zealand

Autumn international player analysis: Sonny Bill Williams, New Zealand

first_img TAGS: Highlight You do not saunter back into a world champion team on the back of 70 minutes’ worth of on-field action in two years without being a very special player. To state the blindingly obvious, Sonny Bill Williams falls within that bracket.In fact, having excelled in boxing as well as both codes of rugby, the 29 year-old can undoubtedly be classed as an extraordinary sportsman. There are few fresh superlatives to attach to his glittering, globe-trotting career. He possesses a universally acknowledged acronym, for goodness’ sake.As such, a pair of replacement cameos for Counties Manukau in the ITM Cup was sufficient to convince Steve Hansen that Williams was ready to jump into another chapter. Merely one month after finishing his two-year stint as a Sydney Rooster, he returned to the New Zealand midfield on Saturday to face the USA in Chicago.Back in business: Williams celebratesWilliams shone in an inevitable thrashing and – without disrespecting the wholehearted hosts at all – it was fascinating to watch him pitted against mere mortals. While USA boasted a handful of Aviva Premiership regulars such as Chris Wyles and Samu Manoa, the All Blacks were rampant.Just as every facet of Brian O’Driscoll’s brilliance was accentuated as he carved up midweek opposition of contrasting ability on the British and Irish Lions tour of Australia in 2013, it was very possible to plot the finer details of Williams’ devastating two-try display.Amusingly, NBC’s American commentary team of Todd Harris and Brian Hightower, who did an excellent job of explaining proceedings to an unfamiliar audience, followed every name with the player’s dimensions – height and weight in feet and pounds. While Williams – 6’3”, 243 – is a mighty specimen, there was so much more than brawn on show.Pending recovery from a corked thigh, Williams will be close to the match-day 23 to face England this weekend. Here is a chronological run-down of his attacking contributions as he pressed a compelling claim for involvement.It took all of 45 seconds for him to burst into the spotlight, tearing onto a short pass from Jeremy Thrush to power through for a clean break:There is nothing overly complicated about New Zealand’s shape from the ruck close to the right touchline and the way Williams picks a line is based on very basic skills. For a start, watch how far behind the gain-line he begins:This depth allows him to build up pace and pick an angle between the two USA defenders circled in white. Fly-half Adam Siddall steps in to cover Thrush, leaving a gaping hole between himself and inside centre Andrew Suniula. Williams needs no second invitation.What comes next is just as impressive. Having cut through, Williams stays on his feet and fights through the contact area in order to allow his support to catch up. Above all, this shows how rapidly he has adapted to rugby union and amended his mindset accordingly.Of course, the laws of league means this would not be necessary because of the lack of breakdowns. This screenshot shows Williams is into a different mind-set though, scanning for teammates before taking the option of going to ground once he realises the ensuing ruck can be won:Minutes after this run, hooker Nathan Harris opened the scoring with New Zealand’s first try. An encouraging period of USA attack followed, but then the All Blacks forced their way on top again. Launching into midfield from the tail of a lineout, Williams laid the foundations:Uncomplicated carrying is a key part of centre play, and here Williams shows his willing to do that job. While he is upended in a strong challenge, note how many defenders are attracted to his run:Three tacklers are needed in the primary line alone, starving the USA of personnel out wide on their left. Unsurprisingly, Cory Jane danced over on that flank from the very next phase.Williams then went from indirect creator to scorer:Ryan Crotty was outstanding at outside centre all afternoon and himself put forward credentials to partner stalwart Conrad Smith at Twickenham. His offload here is wonderful.But, as discussed in last week’s piece on George North, passes out of contact are nothing without an accurate support line. Ever alive to attacking opportunity, Williams anticipates his fellow midfielder’s movements and fights through the covering defence to get to Crotty’s shoulder:At times, this game resembled an All Blacks training run. Minutes later, Williams and Crotty switched roles for another line-break:Blaine Scully is as ballsy as backs come. Even so, Williams pirouettes out of his challenge with ease before linking up with Crotty using his free arm. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Subscribe to Rugby World magazine to read exclusive content on the upcoming autumn internationals. 1. Introduction2. Page 2Page 1 of 2 – Show Full ListIntroductionPage 2 Sonny Bill Williams made his return to the All Blacks side on Saturday in the historic clash with USA at Chicago’s Soldier Field. As New Zealand romped to a 74-6 victory, the code-hopping centre was inspired. We analyse his eye-catching performance. Why not take a closer look:Again, this is a relatively simple principle. The ‘hit and spin’ is one of the first progressions of an Auckland grid taught to juniors. Once more though, Williams marries technical precision to power and intensity, making him so difficult to stop.Onto try number two, which was at first glance a spectacular counter executed typically clinically by the tourists:From TJ Perenara‘s quick lineout onwards, this looks extremely slick. That said, Williams must keep rudimentary ideas in mind. As Israel Dagg runs across the pitch, he treads water and retains width so the ball-carrier can advance ahead. That way, Williams becomes an option for the passer again.Watch how he responds to Dagg’s line to capitalise on the space:Once clear, Williams can showcase his prowess at beating defenders. His step to evade the covering Manoa is worth ogling at again:We are at risk of listing Williams’ attributes now, but they were all in plain evidence, especially as the first half wore on and things got slightly stretched.The following piece of distribution from Williams brought about more trouble for USA:This initially may appear fairly nondescript. However, it provides a perfect lesson in drawing defenders and creating space. Isolating the moment Williams releases his pass to Kieran Read gives us a clear illustration:The filled black line here represents Williams’ run, an arc that straightens up against the grain. We can see the effect this has from the white circle – American openside Scott LaValla turns his shoulders inwards and is committed to the tackle.Only then does Williams let go of the ball. The timing, speed and accuracy of his pass is exquisite. LaValla is out of the game and Read is away. That completed a fine first half from an individual standpoint, but Williams did not let up into the second period.Here, with New Zealand pressing just after the break, he poses problems from a straightforward switch with Aaron Cruden, exploding off that right foot again to leave prop Eric Fry on the turf:Lastly, just prior to leaving the fray on the hour mark with a dead leg, Williams showed an ability to organise from first-receiver.This is a skill that Stuart Lancaster values greatly within the England set-up, recognising that attacking structures are all the more dangerous when can be ‘two-sided’ – essentially loaded with a playmaker on both open- and blindside:To nit-pick, the pass here off Williams’ left hand is not quite as strong as those off his right. Still, he cuts out the pod of forwards and plays in Cruden on a second wave, where the All Blacks are so dangerous.Only Steve Hansen knows where Williams fits in his strategy to take down England on Saturday. Freakish Malakai Fekitoa will take some shifting from the starting line-up, for sure.Clearly though, Williams’ attacking weapons are all polished and firing. Lancaster’s men will have learned nothing new about an old adversary and should be far better prepared to blunt him than the USA were. Of course, given Williams box-office attacking, that is far easier said than done.last_img read more

Structure committee begins to synthesize resolutions

Structure committee begins to synthesize resolutions

first_img Comments (1) By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 6, 2012 Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release General Convention, Structure committee begins to synthesize resolutions Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed. The Standing Commission on the Structure of the Church is the right body to coordinate the Episcopal Church’s effort to change the way it is organized, the Rev. Morgan Allen, a deputy from Texas and vice chair of that commission, tells members of the General Convention’s legislative committee on structure during a hearing July 5. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis, Ind.] General Convention’s Committee on Structure formed a subcommittee July 6 to draft a resolution to substitute for a plethora of existing ones calling for structural change in the Episcopal Church.The action came the morning after an evening hearing during which bishops, deputies and visitors told the committee that the church was in the middle of what some of them called an emergency that prevents it from doing the mission work of spreading the gospel in the world.The committee spent an hour July 6 discussing what it heard during the hearing. Members said they were impressed by the passion and commitment of those who spoke but said the testimony offered “a paucity of ideas” about specifics, in the words of the Rev. Michael Barlowe, deputy from California.Deputy Judith Conley of Arizona said, “People don’t know exactly what they want but are asking for change, something different.”In response, a writing subcommittee was appointed, with a first draft of proposed legislation to be presented at the committee’s July 7 morning meeting. The goal, according to deputy chair the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio, is to have the committee’s proposals finished by July 8.During the July 5 hearing, with each witness speaking for two minutes, and the hearing lasting just more than 90 minutes, the testimony was short on the specifics about the nature of the emergency and what changes each would like to see made in the church’s structure in response. There were repeated calls for putting “everything on the table.”Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania Bishop Sean Rowe led off the testimony insisting that “the church structure as it is now is on the verge of imploding.”“We don’t need out-of-the-box thinking,” he said. “We need to proclaim that there is no box.”Close to an hour later, Joan Geiszler-Ludlum, deputy from East Carolina, objected to that sort of characterization. “Let’s stop thinking and saying our church is broken. Our church is not broken,” she said. “We have in place structures and concepts and values that have served us well for more than 100 years … many of the parts and values still work and remain important to our Episcopal identity.She called for a six-year process that would begin with spending the first three years focusing on the church’s theology and vision, and then working on its infrastructure.“Anything else will have us building a bridge to nowhere rather than a bridge to a new, alive Episcopal Church,” she said.Atlanta Bishop Neil Alexander warned that “we can’t have any idols, we can’t have any sacred cows” while deciding how to develop “a new structure and a new approach to doing mission in the 21st century.”“I believe that every baptized person, ordained or not, shares in the governance of the church, but we’ve also frankly got some idolatry, I believe, around some of our structures and I think it’s time we put them all on the table and gave them a really hard look,” he said.Lynn Schmissrauter, chair of the East Tennessee deputation, said her diocese is “longing for a different, joyful, life-giving, energizing, nimble, courageous, aerodynamic structure for our church.” But, she said, if something is tried and it fails, “we’re not going to get all wadded up about it.”“The tomb is empty and we want to behave like a church that really believes that and allows some gifted people to propose some courageous changes in pursuit of the risen Lord,” she said.“It is sometimes a challenge for people who are deeply involved in current structures to change them, the Rev. Susan Snook, an Arizona deputy, tells members of the General Convention’s legislative committee on structure during a hearing July 5. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergThe July 5 hearing technically covered 51 separate resolutions, 46 of them from dioceses. Most of the diocesan resolutions are based on a model resolution suggested to the House of Bishops in September by Bishop Stacy Sauls, a member of the house who is also the church’s chief operating officer.The model resolution would have convention call for a special commission appointed by the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies to present, possibly to a special meeting of General Convention before the 78th General Convention in 2015, “a plan to the church for reforming its structures, governance, administration, and staff to facilitate this church’s faithful engagement in Christ’s mission….”One resolution, C057 (available here) from the Diocese of San Diego, would amend Article XII of the church constitution to allow for a constitutional convention that could approve and immediately enact other constitutional changes.The Rev. Michael Russell, a San Diego deputy, said a constitutional convention is needed because the other models “are just going to be an opportunity to recycle the same old things by folks who are already well-embedded in the system.”He suggested, instead, that the church needed a “reboot” so that it can more widely incorporate mission work being done by “people in the pews and at the grassroots.” A constitution convention would be a way “to bring all the issues that we have with the constitutional, the canons, the Book of Common Prayer, all those pieces and get everybody at the table who wants to discuss making change in the church.”The Rev. Morgan Allen, a deputy from Texas and vice chair of the Standing Commission on the Structure of the Church, was on the other end of the spectrum of how to structure a church-wide debate on structure. The structure commission’s combined membership of lay, clergy and bishops makes it “suitably situated to respond to the concerns and energy of this convention to change the way that we order ourselves,” according to Allen.“A special convention, a special council, a special commission is an extra step and while it is being made in the effort to become more nimble, I suggest it will actually impair this process,” Allen said. He added that he is concerned about “semi-spurious change” being proposed through only marginally canonical means and “extra canonical methods being used to effect canonical change.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Melodie Woerman is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI General Convention 2012, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Jeremy Bates says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Structure Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA July 6, 2012 at 5:05 pm Laity beware!Let’s be clear about the two things that seem to be going on here.First, discontented with the results of recent General Conventions, some people are now blaming–of all things–our Church’s democratic form of governance. This is illogical. If my political party loses an election, I don’t call for a constitutional convention. Rather, I try to advocate more clearly for my position, and I also try to listen more carefully to see where I may be wrong.Second, there also seems to be a desire on the part of national church leaders to make our church more biddable, more docile. Whether this is a result of budget concerns, or of a desire to make our church easier to control, is not clear.Delegates must not permit these two groups to buffalo Convention into doing anything drastic. This is especially so when no one seems to be able to agree on the problem.What exactly is the problem with our 200-year-old system of governance? If our system of governance is too expensive, then say so. If our system of governance is too democratic, then say so.But don’t beat around the bush. Phrases like “we need a new structure and a new approach to doing mission in the 21st century” may be built on laudable sentiments, but they are empty of structural meaning. What is wrong, if anything, with the current structure? What change, if any, is really needed? And why? Be specific!Delegates, please be wary of who is proposing structural change, and consider why they might be doing this. Usually a call for structural change that is supported at the top results in–surprise, surprise–more power for the top. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Convention wrap-up: Re-envisioning church for the 21st century

Convention wrap-up: Re-envisioning church for the 21st century

first_img Tom Sramek, Jr. says: Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events July 14, 2012 at 11:27 pm Swimming the Tiber… July 15, 2012 at 6:32 pm Follow the lead of many other Anglican throughout the world – “come home” to the Orthodox Christian Church. No need to wallow in the Tiber Mud!! Ferank Harrison says: Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA July 13, 2012 at 6:57 pm Thank you for this synopsis and for all the work done by deputies and bishops in Indianapolis. I think there are many things we did well, some things could have been better, but all will be well. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 14, 2012 at 11:26 pm agreed. General Convention 2012 Jean de LaVallette says: July 13, 2012 at 7:03 am @ Tom Stramek: rather a smoke belching, dented and disintegrating, old Ford. than a clean, humming, classic Rolls Royce? Makes perfect sense for an Episcopalian. Peter Leahy says: July 13, 2012 at 2:21 pm I question the accord and relationship with the Mormon Church. Their teachings across the board are not compatible with Christianity as it has been practiced since the time of Jesus. The second class status of non-whites is particularly appauling and still widely held. The fact they actually practice post death baptisms/conversions alone including those of the holocaust and even family members of Presidents is creepy and they restart them after the controversies die down. They teach the ghosts of our founding fathers have appeared in their temples requesting conversion including departed Episcopalians! They have doctrine that allows them to lie in any discussions with non-members to protect their faith. Secret handshakes and passwords required to enter heaven that only they know but are actually stolen Masonic rituals. The fact they teach that if you pay the tithe, learn the handshakes you can get to be a God of your own planet! What psychological damage does growing up in a church that teaches you that the men will be God if they only obey completely and that the wives and daughters will be separated from them for eternity if they do not subjugate themselves to their God-husband. Despite their attempts to have a squeaky clean image what they teach is not Christianity and engagement gives them legitimacy. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Steve White says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Fr.Michael Neal says: Convention wrap-up: Re-envisioning church for the 21st century scott foresman says: General Convention, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 16, 2012 at 8:19 am Will the clergy who are in favor of the resolution authorizing the blessing of same sex unions (which I also favor) also abide by the resolution affirming baptism as the norm for those wishing to receive communion (which I also favor)? If not, then resolutions at General Convention have little meaning and we are rather more congregational than episcopal. If the Episcopal Church is to have ecclesiastical integrity, then all clergy must play by the rules whether they like them or not. I have to say I’m not optimistic about this. July 13, 2012 at 6:36 pm What Brad Purdom points out is correct. The engagement in dialogue with the Mormons is meant to be interreligious in the same way that we engage in interreligious dialogue with those of the Jewish, Muslim, and Buddhist faiths, among others. The idea is to engage people of faith across many religions for the purposes of friendship, good will, understanding, peace, and reconciliation among all peoples of the world. We coexist on the earth and must learn to share the blessings of the earth with all nations and peoples. Mutual understanding and ongoing conversations have the potential to lead to better cooperation and collaboration in our communities for the common good. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Lindsay Porter says: July 17, 2012 at 4:45 pm As a 29-year-old cradle and still active Episcopalian, I have never been more proud. Dan Booher says: Featured Jobs & Calls Susan Gage says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 13, 2012 at 4:52 am I can’t imagine why. Unless issues of sexuality are THE only issues on which one bases one’s adherence to a particular denomination. Personally, I think the Roman Catholic church is in the process of disintegration and those who seek a refuge there from so-called “revisionist teachings” may find themselves unpleasantly surprised that they have no say whatsoever in the running of their parish, much less their diocese. Personally, I’ll take messy Episcopal Christianity over clean but tightly controlled Roman Catholic Christianity. Rector Pittsburgh, PA By Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 12, 2012 July 19, 2012 at 11:30 pm You know? After reading through the Passed Resolutions synopsis and then all of the comments, I have to just say: What a true image of a family! Many opinions–some seeming to come from a more enlightened place, and some even from a place that, shall we say, may be a little south of the heart of the Gospel message–but all of them from an honest and true place of our personal experience of human coexistence as one giant family. I personally think that the more politically liberal of the resolutions which were passed are wonderful affirmations; but on a much broader and more universal plane, I think that as we as Episcopalians strive to acknowledge and discuss our differences openly and yet join together in unity at the table to be fed as one body from our great God’s heavenly Grace–not condemning or pushing away those who we may disagree with–we do well to make a more intentional gesture to those among us who may, even as ‘open’ a church we may seem, still feel abashed and less-than-worthy to share that banquet with us in the full freedom and expression of personal spirituality and individual discernment of the Holy Spirit within; and who may feel as though they lack the full acknowledgement of the Church itself, that they, too, are crucial members of this Body: To make it obviously clear that although there may be visible room, “This seat is open. Come sit next to me.” How wonderful to know that we belong to a Church, that, even if we may need to be reminded at times, somehow innately knows no matter what our differences may be besides, when we join our voices as one to confess our singular Faith in the Creed and exchange the Peace with a heart free from malice and hate, that we ARE truly one. Thanks be to God for all the tireless efforts of our Bishops and Representatives: May he grant them all a heart of love and service; the wisdom and strength to open them effectively to our world; and the faith and perseverence to present them back to him. Amen. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 16, 2012 at 7:57 pm I gather the longing for Rome that I have been reading is related to Rome’s unenlightened stance on same-sex relationships. Those who think that this will help them will find that Rome, whatever it says, is hurtling at locomotive speed toward loving, Christian, open acceptance of gay folks. Yes, yes I know what they say, but official, public statements are at odds with congregational attitudes and behavior. I predict that Rome is only ten years behind us. As a gay man in a 42 year old relationship, I weep with joy that most Episcopalians are becoming more Christ like daily. I am so proud of my brothers and sisters. I too pray that God has his way with the Church. I also pray for those who disagree with me. In the words of the first priest that I asked about this, “Dan, there have always been gay men and women in the Church. What we are discussing is whether we will say there are.” AMEN. Peace. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 13, 2012 at 11:57 am AMEN! I can’t think of any more depressing organization than the current Roman church! I am SO PROUD TO BE AN EPISCOPALIAN! As my 75 and 78 year old parents said when they converted to the Episcopal Church … “this is how we always imagined church should be.” Francis Desmarais says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Lee Rose says: Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 12, 2012 at 9:30 pm For all of the difficulties with Rome, it is becoming ever more appealing to many of my fellow Episcopalians. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Dot Cellini says: Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Comments (16) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] General Convention has called on the Episcopal Church to re-imagine its structure, taken historic steps towards full inclusion, endorsed positive investment in the Palestinian Territories, and reaffirmed its commitment to building Anglican Communion relationships while declining to take a position on the Anglican Covenant.Based on the Anglican Communion’s Five Marks of Mission, the budget for the Episcopal Church in the 2013-2015 triennium was adopted unanimously by the 77th General Convention July 11.The budget, available here, is balanced at $111,516,032, compared to $111,808,350 for the current triennium, and comes with a small surplus of $30,000.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and outgoing President of the House of Deputies Bonnie Anderson addressed the media at a closing news conference July 12.At this convention, “you have seen the Episcopal Church not only of the future, but of today, in the presence of young adults, a more significant number than we’ve seen in a long time, people of many nations and tribes and language traditions,” said Jefferts Schori, noting that more than 40 international guests attended convention. “The Episcopal Church is healthy, it’s becoming healthier, and it’s poised for an even more significant impact on the world around us. There’s no stopping us. Watch out world. We’re coming.”Anderson, who now steps down as House of Deputies president, said it has been a great convention and that the deputies, 44 percent of whom were new, were extremely well prepared.General Convention, which met July 5-12 at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis, is composed of the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies, which includes clergy and laity.Structural reformOf the almost 400 resolutions submitted to General Convention more than 90 related to structural reform. Most of those resolutions were similar in nature and it was the work of the structure committee at convention to consider the legislation and make its recommendations to the house.Applause and cheers erupted July 11 as Resolution C095, which calls for creation of a task force to re-imagine the workings of the Episcopal Church in the 21st century, sailed unanimously through the House of Bishops. A day earlier, deputies also had passed the resolution unanimously.The legislation creates a special task force of up to 24 people who will gather ideas in the next two years from all levels of the church about possible reforms to its structures, governance and administration. Its work will culminate in a special gathering of people from every diocese to hear what recommendations the task force plans to make to the 78th General Convention. Its final report is due by November 2014.Full story.Bishop Stacy Sauls, chief operating officer for the Episcopal Church, praised the work of both the structure committee and convention.“My hope has always been that we would begin to have a conversation and the church embraced that. The conversation became a movement of hope for the future of the church.”He added that the people of Episcopal Church have realized – and the institutional is getting it – “that we are standing on the brink of an unprecedented moment; have seen it as opportunity rather than threat.”Full story.The spending portion of the budget for the next triennium is allocated according to the Anglican Communion’s Five Marks of Mission, and the categories of administration and governance. The five marks are:To proclaim the Good News of the KingdomTo teach, baptize and nurture new believersTo respond to human need by loving serviceTo seek to transform unjust structures of societyTo strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earthThe budget assumes $73.5 million in commitments from the church’s dioceses, nearly $4 million less than that in the current triennium. That total is based on keeping at 19 percent the amount that the church asks dioceses to contribute annually to the church-wide budget.Same-gender blessingsIn a historic move, convention authorized provisional use of a rite for blessing same-gender unions. “The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant” rite will be available for use starting Dec. 2 (the first Sunday of Advent), but clergy will need the permission of their bishop under the terms of the resolution.The resolution calls on the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music “to conduct a review process over the next triennium, making clear that this is a work in progress,” the Rev. Ruth Meyers, deputy of the Diocese of Chicago, told the deputies. She chaired the convention Prayer Book, Liturgy and Church Music Committee’s subcommittee on blessings and the SCLM.The resolution directs the SCLM to include “diverse theological perspectives in the further development of the theological resource” and to invite responses from throughout the church as well as from the Anglican Communion and the church’s ecumenical partners.The resolution states that, under existing canons, clergy can decline to preside at a blessing liturgy and says that no one “should be coerced or penalized in any manner, nor suffer any canonical disabilities” for objecting to or supporting the 77th General Convention’s action on blessings.Full story.Gender identity, expressionTwo resolutions passed by convention offer support for the transgender community by adding gender expression and identity to two canons that prevent discrimination. One makes clear that the ordination discernment process is open to them, and another guarantees their equal place in the life, worship and governance of the church.Full story.Following action on same-gender blessings and transgender rights, the majority of the Diocese of South Carolina’s deputies left the General Convention July 11 because, in the words of its remaining clergy deputy, the gathering had passed resolutions that violate the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Episcopal Church.However, that deputy, the Very Rev. John B. Burwell, told Episcopal News Service, “We are not leaving the Episcopal Church.”Positive investmentConvention overwhelmingly supported a resolution on positive investment in the Palestinian Territories. But the bishops agreed to postpone indefinitely a conversation on corporate engagement.Resolution B019 affirms positive investment “as a necessary means to create a sound economy and a sustainable infrastructure” in the Palestinian Territories. It also calls on the church to support “the Jewish, Muslim, and Christian study on peace with justice in the Middle East,” and produce an annotated bibliography of resources.Resolution C060, which called on the church to engage “in corporate social responsibility by more vigorous and public corporate engagement with companies in the church’s investment portfolio that contribute to the infrastructure of the Occupation,” was tabled after Bishop Sean Rowe of Northwestern Pennsylvania called for the conversation to be postponed indefinitely. The deputies had passed that resolution on July 9, but it would have required the bishops’ consent.Full story.Anglican Covenant, Continuing IndabaConvention also affirmed its commitment to building relationships across the Anglican Communion, especially through the Continuing Indaba program, and to decline to take a position on the Anglican Covenant.After considering eight resolutions, the General Convention’s committee on world mission recommended adoption of two resolutions on Anglican Communion relationships and the Anglican Covenant, a document that initially had been intended as a way to bind Anglicans globally across cultural and theological differences.Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, chair of the World Mission Committee, told ENS following the vote that the resolutions are “a genuine pastoral response because we are not of one mind, and to push a decision at this time would cause hurt and alienation in our church on both sides and instead we chose to stay in the conversation.”Full story.The Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio was elected to serve as the next president of the House of Deputies and Byron Rushing of Massachusetts as the next vice president. Each will serve a three-year term beginning at the end of General Convention.Other legislation that convention passed includes:SudanResolution A019, re-affirming advocacy support for peace in Sudan. (Full story)Release of Cuban prisonersResolution A021 (http://www.generalconvention.org/gc/resolutions?by=number&id=a021), calling for the release of all in Cuban prisons for religious activities or peaceful advocacy of political change in the Republic of Cuba; and to support advocacy efforts for the humane treatment and pastoral care of four Cuban nationals convicted of spying for the government of the Republic of Cuba, who are serving prison sentences in United States.EcumenismResolution A036, which commends the 11-year relationship of full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and asks the Lutheran-Episcopal Coordinating Committee to address areas where Episcopal and Lutheran practices differ, especially around the matter of who can preside at Holy Communion and the role of deacons.Studying marriageResolution A050, authorizing a task force to study marriage. It calls for creation of a 12-member task force to study marriage, including needs for pastoral responses by clergy for same-sex couples in states where civil marriage is legal, as well as issues “raised by changing societal and cultural norms and legal structures.”Prayer BookResolution A059, revising the Holy Week readings in the Prayer Book to correspond with those in the Revised Common Lectionary;Poverty and justiceResolution A135, a compilation of several other resolutions that responds to issues of poverty and injustice. It commits the church over the next three years to “teaching, preaching, organizing, advocating, and building mutually transformative relationships with those who are poor to focus our hearts and the mission of our congregations and dioceses on reducing poverty and increasing economic and racial justice.” It also calls for every meeting that takes place in the church to include time for prayer and reflection “on how our work engages issues of poverty and economic and racial justice networks” in order to “cultivate mindfulness about poverty in our communities and world.” Full story.Monitoring women, other underrepresented groupsResolution A144, requiring the tracking of the ratio of women to men in bishop election processes, along with racial and ethnic minorities, and encouraging dioceses to strive for greater diversity in candidates.Support for Gaza hospitalResolution B017, calling on the church to support the Diocese of Jerusalem’s Al Ahli Hospital in Gaza with fundraising and advocacy after the United Nations Relief and Works Agency cut its financial aid, slashing the hospital’s budget nearly in half.Reconciliation or dissolution of an Episcopal relationshipResolution B021, which amends the canons to provide a mechanism for addressing disagreement in the pastoral relationship between a diocese and its bishop.Denominational Health PlanResolution B026, to give dioceses and parishes an additional three years to meet the requirement that they provide parity in health insurance cost-sharing between lay and clergy employees. That deadline now is extended until Dec. 31, 2015. Dioceses and parishes still must offer health insurance to employees through the Church Medical Trust by the end of 2012. It also calls the Medical Trust to continue to explore “more equitable sharing of health care premium costs.”Access to Holy Baptism, Holy CommunionResolution C029, affirming the Episcopal Church’s teaching that Baptism is the norm for those who wish to receive Holy Communion.Relocating Episcopal Church CenterResolution D016, to approve a move away from, but did not authorize the sale of, the Episcopal Church Center headquarters at 815 Second Avenue in New York. (Full story)Establish development officeResolution D025, establishing a Development Office for the Episcopal Church to solicit major gifts and other resources.Pilot Student Loan ProgramResolution D049, which calls for creating a pilot student loan fund for seminarians who agree to exercise three years of ministry in under-served areas of the Episcopal Church.Dialogue with Mormon ChurchResolution D081, directing the Standing Commission on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations to initiate dialogue between the Episcopal Church and the Mormon Church “for the interreligious purposes of friendship, goodwill, mutual understanding” and in anticipation of the 78th General Convention to be held in Salt Lake City in 2015.For a full list of resolutions acted on at the 77th General Convention, click here.— Matthew Davies is editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Lelanda Lee says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Brad Purdom says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 13, 2012 at 5:53 pm I think you will find that the engagement is clearly and intentionally described as interfaith rather than ecumenical. That was discussed on the floor at least in the HOB. We obviously engage many other faiths in dialogue and work with many other faiths in mission. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS scott foresman says: July 14, 2012 at 1:57 pm May the Lord have mercy on TEC. A Christian church still? maybe, with a few left in SC and UNY and scattered here and there. I have friends and family in TEC and I love them dearly, but too far is too far. Christianity is not all inclusive, “many will go through that wide gate to hell, few will enter the narrow to heaven.” My prayer is God will have HIS way with TEC and those who have made unbiblical choices within the church will be removed , or repent. The time has come. Judgement is sure. Press on…last_img read more

Canada: Let’s help aboriginal families heal, says Hiltz

Canada: Let’s help aboriginal families heal, says Hiltz

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Anglican Journal] First, the church played a role in tearing aboriginal families apart. Now, it needs to help put them back together, says the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.Referring to the ongoing inter-generational impact of residential schools, Archbishop Fred Hiltz emphasized that the church “needs to play a role in nurturing and supporting initiatives that help heal aboriginal families.“We were part of tearing families apart,” Archbishop Hiltz told more than 200 aboriginal Anglicans attending the Seventh Sacred Circle held Aug. 5 to 12 in Pinawa, Man. “We must be part of healing and bringing them back together and helping them move to a place of health and happiness.”Hiltz noted how youth who attended the gathering “have carried someone in their hearts, some friend who’s taken their life.”The Sacred Circle also heard from Ted Quewezance, executive director of the Residential School Survivors’ Society, who talked about the impact of residential schools on five generations of his family. Quewezance attended the Anglican-run Gordon Indian Residential School in Saskatchewan when he was five years old and stayed there for 11 years.He urged the Anglican church to focus on rebuilding and nurturing families within their communities, noting that members of his family attended residential schools at various times from 1900 to 1996 and had to deal with trauma on their own. “Truth-telling with one another is a hard thing…but it can be done with respect [and] it’s really, really rewarding,” he said. Uncovering the past helped his family to understand and reconnect, he added. “The legacy we want to leave for our families is how we work to understand the damage that was done to us.”In his homily at the closing eucharist, Hiltz called human rights violations against Canada’s aboriginal peoples “a blot on the soul of this country.” One in four indigenous children live in poverty compared to one in nine in the rest of Canada, he pointed out. “One in nine is bad enough,” he said. “One in four is worse.” Many native communities receive 25 per cent less in resources to support education, he added, and the scarcity of fresh fruits and vegetables have given rise to health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.Healing will come when government, church and society heed “the prophetic call of Micah…to love kindness, to do justice and walk humbly again with God,” said Hiltz.The Mississauga Declaration issued recently by the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP) could be “a major plank for…a national strategy toward right relations” among all Canadians, said Hiltz. The declaration “has a life, place and an influence far beyond our church alone.”The declaration states that, among other things, indigenous Anglicans must act to reaffirm their “sovereign identity as the people of the Land and to revive, renew and reclaim” ministries in their communities. It was issued in response to the high rates of suicide, poverty, addiction and other pastoral crises in indigenous Anglican communities, according to an ACIP report presented to the Council of General Synod last year.In an interview with the Anglican Journal, Hiltz said one of the “most profound moments” at Sacred Circle was the consensus among indigenous Anglicans to approve Canon 22, which recognizes the roles of national indigenous ministry. “It was just a beautiful Pentecostal moment,” he said. By approving Canon 22, Sacred Circle acknowledged that the church has accepted “the hand of partnership” with indigenous people on their path to self-determination. Canon 22 will be presented to General Synod in 2013.— Marites N. Sison, staff writer of Anglican Journal. With files from General Synod Communications. Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Marites N. SisonPosted Aug 16, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Indigenous Ministries In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canada: Let’s help aboriginal families heal, says Hiltz Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

Muslim Friday prayers to be offered at Washington National Cathedral

Muslim Friday prayers to be offered at Washington National Cathedral

first_img November 12, 2014 at 3:10 pm Rev. Prechtel, in the Episcopal Tradition of “agreement is not required,” I respectfully but PASSIONATELY disagree. CAIR, one of the participatory organizations in the event, has well-documented ties to Hamas and other terrorist organizations. So intertwined are CAIR and Hamas that in 2009, the FBI severed all ties with CAIR, with which it had fostered a cooperative relations after September 11, 2001. ISNA has similar ties to Hamas’ funding. I became an Episcopalian because we- I thought- stood for self-determination, peace, the empowerment of women, helping the poor, and the acceptance of LBGT people- all while acknowledging the Holy Trinity as the source of our strength and power. Here, “our” church has decided to be lead by the blind hand of political correctness, ignoring the fact that these organizations fund an organization that represents the antithesis of all those things. Among those are the destruction of the State of Israel, the indiscriminate launching of rockets at civilian targets which take the lives of the innocent, and the global support of terrorism. Also, consider that men and women will be segregated during their service. How is this consistent with our values? I haven’t even addressed the fact that Islam denies the divinity of Christ, the central tenet of our faith! For the first time, I am ashamed to call myself an Episcopalian. The Episcopal Church needs to stand up for something- our purported values.Respectfully,An newly ashamed member of the Episcopal Diocese of Eastern Michigan Posted Nov 11, 2014 November 12, 2014 at 4:30 am And I know one person who will start sending money now……ME and anyone else that truly wants to follow what Jesus taught. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest November 12, 2014 at 1:17 pm You’re being silly if “loving your enemies” means “facilitating their errors.” November 14, 2014 at 1:48 pm Oh, Mr. Spangler and fellow travellers, you are proud to be part of a church that lets Muslim men do prayers in our flagship place of worship while their women are forced to sit in the back? Did you watch the service today? You are down with that? Really? Are you proud of letting in people with unmitigated irrefutable proof representing terror-supporting groups? Really ?Wow. That’s just breathtaking. Read below, and see if you can still poisitively affirm this. If you can, may God have mercy on your souls. I am not a naysayer-, I am a truth teller. If you all have willfull blindness to the truth, so be it. I speak truth to power, why don’t you?In fact, it is against Islamic law for Muslims to hold Christianity or Judaism in the same regard the Episcopal Church is now showing Islam. Indeed, Islamic law “abrogates” (cancels) Christianity and Judaism as “previously revealed religions (that) were valid in their own eras,” but are no longer — not after the advent of Islam in the 7th century.I am quoting above from “Reliance of the Traveller,” the authoritative Sunni law book, which, in explaining the “finality” of Islam (page 846), asserts that it is “unbelief (kufr) to hold that remnant cults now bearing the names of formerly valid religions, such as ‘Christianity’ or ‘Judaism,’ are acceptable to Allah” post-Mohammed. (“Unbelief,” meanwhile, is an act of Islamic apostasy and punishable by death.) Clearly, no devout Muslim can show “appreciation” for the “prayer tradition” of a “remnant cult.” The sharia textbook is definitive about this point, adding: “This is a matter over which there is no disagreement among Islamic scholars.”Not surprisingly, then, Ebrahim Rasool’s prayer-service statement conveys no interfaith reciprocity. Instead, he presses the need to “embrace our humanity and to embrace faith” — not “our faiths” (plural). As usual, Islamic “outreach” is a one-way, non-ecumenical street.But how could it be otherwise, according to Islam’s own teachings? Islamic expert Andrew Bostom notes that the Koranic prayers Muslims recite daily and specifically on Fridays “include, prominently, Koran suras (chapters) 1, 87 and 88.” Sura 1, verse 7, he notes, is repeated up to 17 times per day by observant Muslims. It calls on Allah to guide Muslims “to the straight path, to the path of those you have blessed, not those who incurred (Your) wrath, nor of the misguided.” The former group (“wrath”) is Jewish; the latter (“misguided”) is Christian.This is not exactly a “prayer tradition” that encourages the “appreciation” Episcopalians undoutbedly expect.It gets worse – at least for Christians and Jews. Typically, Friday “Jum’ah” prayers, following Mohammed’s own example, include Suras 87 and 88, Bostom explains. These verses are almost palpably acrid with hell-fire and humiliation for Christians and Jews, according to authoritative Koranic commentaries. Most conservatives will look at this cathedral event as a milestone for “Islamism” — as though Muslim Brotherhood-linked organizations and their activities have little intersection with Islam itself. Rich Basta says: November 12, 2014 at 6:23 pm 246 groups were listed by Federal prosecutors in 2007 as unindicted co-conspiritors in the Holy Land Foundation case. I don’t believe that either group Mr. Basta is labeling as “terrorist-supporting” has ever been charged with a crime and in 2010 a federal appeals court sealed the list, finding that the ruling violated the groups’ rights and was the result of “simply an untested allegation of the Government, made in anticipation of a possible evidentiary dispute that never came to pass.” We need to be careful about asserting guilt by association–a previous era in the United States did that out of fear to the harm of many people.I do find it humorous that Mr. Basta presumes to know me so well as to be certain how I will respond “when the jihadists come.” November 12, 2014 at 3:42 pm Daniel, reasonable people often disagree. But please don’t straw man. November 12, 2014 at 12:05 pm Rev. Prechtel:Your statements have so many holes in them, that I don’t know where to begin, but here goes:1. Those who are using angry words in this instance are not children that need to be scolded by you. There is such a thing such as righteous anger. You may recall Jesus’ anger at the money changers in the Temple who were desecraing a holy worship space. So, I would posit that this anger is not that of a child who lashes out, but at those terrorist-supporting groups like CAIR who violate the sanctity of a Christian worship space. Jesus was not raecting to a new thing. He was reacting to what he perceived to be a bad thing. Or, was Jesus (and I) wrong to be angry?2. Having terrosist-supporting groups who deny the existence of the Triune God, which includes the Holy Spirit is not a sign of the Holy Spirit at work. The Holy Sprit does not approve of those that deny it’s very existence. Do you comprehend the logical fallacy of your argument, or do I need to be clearer?3. No one here is saying we shouldn’t build healthy relationships across faith traditions. There are ways do that, as I said, if you had bothered to read or comprehend my post. This is not one of those.4. As far as your statement about Christian identity, yes, I would like to work towards a nation that has a Christian identity. Not a theocracy, mind you. I beleive there was something in the Great Commission about making Disciples of all nations. I’m pretty sure Jesus wasn’t talking about . I have not doubt that when the jihadists come, you will be the first to surrender your collar.Have a nice day….. November 11, 2014 at 4:41 pm I wonder if the Muslim liturgical material to be used at our National Cathedral will include the confession that God is one and has no Son!The Rev’d Paul Clayton, Ph. D., retired ecumenical and interfaith officer of the Diocese of New York. November 11, 2014 at 10:34 pm We have boundaries and our religions have boundaries, but I believe that God is bieyond all our boundaries. Here’s one Episcopalian grateful for the National Cathedral being open for prayers to God from other faiths. If we are to survive and thrive, we must come together. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Rev. Daniel Prechtel says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ November 12, 2014 at 8:33 am I reserve judgment on this inter-faith effort. I will think it successful when we have Sunday prayers in a commensurate mosque on a regular basis. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Larry James says: Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Nolan McBride says: November 13, 2014 at 1:50 pm I am horrified! I wonder if they would consider letting ACNA use the space, or Baptists? Being hospitable and respectful does not mean allowing groups that disregard human rights and explicitly deny tenets of our faith to use space consecrated for the worship of the Holy Trinity. What is next Wiccans? Lord have mercy! Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY The Rev. Daniel Prechtel says: December 3, 2014 at 5:03 pm The first Episcopal Church I served was very proud and rightly so of an Ecumenical offer they had made a year before. A neighborhood synagogue had burned down. THey offered the Church as an emergency place to worship for the Jewish Congregation. Were they wrong to do this? Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Doug Desper says: Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: Brad Howard says: November 15, 2014 at 1:29 pm In John 14:6 Jesus said, ” I am the way the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me.” Jesus loves everyone. But He never ask us to compromise this teaching. There are enough people in our society who believe that we are all serving one God. As a Christian who happens to be a member of the Episcopal Church I do not think that praying to Allah in the cathedral is honoring my God the father, God the Holy spirit, and God the Son. Allah isn’t in there.It is apparent the Episcopal Church has a disease that being spread by the big deceiver. I don’t think the people realized that the Muslim will not compromise their belief. I hope you don’t believe that a group of Christian would be permitted to pray in a Muslim mosque. I think it is clear that the National Cathedral is not consistent with what Jesus taught when He said (again), I am the TRUTH and the LIFE. NO ONE comes to the FATHER EXCEPT through ME (JESUS not Allah). I am seriously considering leaving the Episcopal Church. There are churches teach that the only way to God is through His son Jesus Christ. Rector Knoxville, TN November 12, 2014 at 10:21 pm Janet, please be civil. You can make your points without resorting to attacks ad hominem. Zachary Brooks says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Frank Christian says: Comments navigation Newer comments November 14, 2014 at 8:11 am I do not hate Muslims, but I love God.EPH 1:22-23 “And He put all things under His feet, and gave Him to be head over all things to the church, which is His body, the fullness of Him who fills all in all”.Mark 12:29-31 “Jesus answered him, ‘The first of all the commandments is: ‘Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one. And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.’ This is the first commandment. And the second, like it, is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”I love God. Loving my neighbor is ‘like’ the first, but NOT the first. I (try to) love my neighbor as myself, and I (try to) love God before myself. God(first), Me(after), Neighbor(as me). John 10:25-30 “Jesus answered them, ‘I told you, and you do not believe. The works that I do in My Father’s name, they bear witness of Me. But you do not believe, because you are not of My sheep, as I said to you. My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me. And I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; neither shall anyone snatch them out of My hand. My Father, who has given them to Me, is greater than all; and no one is able to snatch them out of My Father’s hand. I and My Father are one.”I have good friends that are Muslim, but I draw the line when it comes to my devotion to Jesus. Patrick McDonald says: Comments navigation Newer comments November 12, 2014 at 10:58 am I am proud of the Episcopal leadership of the Washington National Cathedral for this initiative in showing respect and hospitality to another of the major faith traditions in our nation and world. This cathedral is envisioned as a house of prayer for all peoples and stands as a symbol for our national capacity for prayer and conscience. It is not a surprise to see fearful and angry words immediately react against this new thing. It is normal to fear changes that possibly threaten a fixed and comfortable Christian identity and support the dominant myth that this is a Christian nation. But that way fails to evidence the signs of the Spirit at work. Instead let us build healthy relationships across faith traditions. This is one such effort. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Debi Brown says: November 11, 2014 at 11:18 pm I have seen some things that have amazed me. The naivety displayed here is the icing on the cake. How many christian towns have been destroyed and christians murdered in the middle east? Not 1400 years ago but last year. Do you think that, instead of prayer, putting an end to those murderous acts would “… demonstrates an appreciation of one another’s prayer traditions and is a powerful symbolic gesture toward a deeper relationship between the two Abrahamic traditions.” ? Do you think that just the simple act of condemnation from CAIR and other muslim groups would be a start? I dare you to make a request to hold a Sunday mass at any Mosque. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME November 14, 2014 at 2:14 am I am embarrassed to be an Episcopalian when we seem to have abandoned all our values. Apparently the goal is to drive people away from the Episcopal Faith. I guess the Cathedral can be opened up for anybody for anything. I have received many emails from people around the country asking me what is going on with the Episcopal Church? I am very disappointed. November 12, 2014 at 4:44 am Your statement shows your ignorance.During the first Gulf War the late Casey Kasem’s mosque in Los Angeles was open to continueous prayers during the days of that was. Christian leaders and Jewish leaders as well as Muslim clerics conducted prayer services throughout the conflict.You have a deep misunderstanding of the Koran and an even deeper misunderstanding of the teachings of Jesus who asked that we love our enemies leave the judgements to God. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT November 12, 2014 at 5:51 pm Brad, I may have unintentionally veered in that direction and I do apologize. Reasonable people do often disagree. The Rev’d John Edson says: Janet McMannis says: John David Spangler says: Rich Basta says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 November 13, 2014 at 3:29 pm Regarding Rev. Prechtel’s latest post, I respctfully offer an additional perspective from Andrew C. McCarthy, a formal federal prosecutor with specific knowledge of the ruling to which you were referring. He admits that you were correct, but only partially. This probably won’t change your mind, but who knows?“At a trial, a coconspirator is not entitled to be kept anonymous. The jury and the public get to learn the unabridged basis for the government’s accusations. Thus, at the Holy Land Foundation trial, abundant evidence was introduced — much of it in the form of internal documents seized from Muslim Brotherhood officials — proving that the Brotherhood sees its mission in the United States as a “grand jihad”[1] to destroy the West from within by “sabotage.” The Brotherhood formed a Palestine Committee whose mandate was to support Hamas. Palestine Committee members included HLF and, later, the Brotherhood’s new creation, CAIR. Meantime, Brotherhood documents named ISNA and the NAIT as partners in its “grand jihad.” In fact, HLF was housed for a time at ISNA’s Indiana offices, and checks were often routed to Hamas through a joint ISNA/NAIT bank account.That was what the prosecution’s evidence showed. You can hide the coconspirator list, but the evidence doesn’t go away. That’s why there are diminishing returns for the Islamist groups in grousing about the list. That only calls attention to the fact that the Justice Department cited them in the first place and then, critically, backed it up with evidence.In that light, the Fifth Circuit’s ruling is mostly a non-event. The court merely pointed out the government’s admission that it was wrong to file the coconspirator list publicly — although, interestingly, the judges did not seem as convinced as the Justice Department that this faux pas rises to the level of a constitutional due-process violation. More significantly, though, the Fifth Circuit declined to expunge names from the list or the trial proof. All it agreed to do was unseal a lower court ruling. That, however, is a double-edged sword for the Brotherhood satellites: Yes, the ruling says their Fifth Amendment rights were violated — a fact they obviously see as a PR coup — but it also reportedly describes the proof of their ties to the Brotherhood. (The lower-court ruling has not yet been unsealed but the Fifth Circuit decision clues us in on what it says.)CAIR, ISNA, and NAIT do not have a branding problem. They have a substance problem. They may be able to falsely frame people as “Islamophobes.” It’s tough to frame facts.” Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 November 14, 2014 at 3:05 pm Yes, Mr. Basta, I did watch the Jumu’ah service to-day. To my earlier remarks, I simply add three cheers and one cheer more!!!I know that I should love my neighbor as myself and that you are my neighbor, and that I should not loose my temper but you make very hard not to do so.Peace! John David Spangler says: November 12, 2014 at 3:44 pm Nailed it, Rich, Zachary and Doug! Well said. November 12, 2014 at 1:15 pm I am sure these Muslims are nice enough people, and shame on the bigotry and fear mongering in these comments. But I am baffled why the National Cathedral thinks hospitality necessitates opening our churches to non-Christian rites, and I am greatly saddened at yet another example of our leadership co-opting the Christian faith for the sake of the cult of niceness. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Dannyy L Anderson says: November 12, 2014 at 8:05 pm Well If it is a house of prayer for all people we need to put a star of David and a crescent moon on ether side of the cross that’s on top of the cathedral. Since we will be letting non Christians use the space. Its just a space now since its being defiled. I don’t care what you people call me bigot what ever I am a Christian and worship in a Christian church. Thank God that would never happen in any parish in my town. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Rich Basta says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET John L Finlon says: Submit an Event Listing November 12, 2014 at 4:46 am Thank you from another Episcopalian. I plan to be there. Bob Thwing says: November 14, 2014 at 11:14 am From a cradle to grave Episcopalian, I say 3 cheers to the WNC for being bold and for providing radical hospitality, just as Jesus would want us to do. Thank you. Rich Basta says: December 1, 2014 at 11:14 am The National Cathedral is a House of Prayer for all people, but, lest we forget, God drove Israel’s warring nations out of the Temple in Jerusalem. Should we invite known enemies to offer prayers at the Cathedral? I think not! George McPhee says: Jessica Hitchcock says: November 14, 2014 at 2:39 pm Thank you for your clear witness that people of faith from all traditions can pray together. In the best of our traditions honoring or following one way does not negate others. Janet McMannis says: Ecumenical & Interreligious The Rev. Daniel Prechtel says: Lisa Hall says: Mark Hatch says: Rector Shreveport, LA November 14, 2014 at 11:31 am Jesus called upon us to love and serve everyone as serving Christ. We are to love and forgive all as individuals, Muslims included, but we are not called to support and encourage organizations that are formulated to wipe Christianity from the face of the earth, and replace it with another belief system. Jesus also made whips and turned tables over. Instead of a real knowledge of scripture and history, we are being guided by oatmeal mush, spineless, lukewarm, new age, create God in our image, politically correct hogwash. I have attended the Episcopal church for 40 years. This may be my last year. November 11, 2014 at 5:34 pm Guess they don’t mind losing more donation money. I know 5 people that are friends of the cathedral that will stop sending.money now. November 14, 2014 at 3:10 pm Kay, I welcome your kind words. You understand the real, deep meaning of our faith. I fear that, because of his fears, Mr. Basta does not. Peace, David Fr. Paul Clayton says: Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska November 11, 2014 at 9:00 pm Well said, Brad. The single common thread we have with Islam is the line of Abraham, and even that is a point of contention. It is a very tortured thought process that eliminates The Incarnation of Jesus Christ to have something vaguely in common with Islam which denies it.The National Cathedral has mistakenly taken its motto “A House of Prayer for All People” to mean that any deity will be accomodated. Long ago I, and several in my circles, returned donation requests by the National Cathedral with notes to remove us from their lists. It’s a pity that it has come to this. Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (63) Tags Brian Cherry says: Kara Wagner Sherer says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET November 11, 2014 at 2:41 pm This is not a good development. They invited representatives from the Muslim Brotherhood founded organizations, CAIR and ISNA, to attend, who are documented, un-indicted co-conspirators in the Holy Land Foundation terrorism trial. It is inclusiveness taken to an absurd extreme.In the Holy Land Foundation trial, abundant evidence was introduced — much of it in the form of internal documents seized from Muslim Brotherhood officials — proving that the Brotherhoodsees its mission in the United States as a “grand jihad” to destroy the West from within by “sabotage.” The Brotherhood formed a Palestine Committee whose mandate was to support Hamas. Palestine Committee members included HLF and, later, the Brotherhood’s new creation, CAIR. Meantime, Brotherhood documents named ISNA and the NAIT as partners in its “grand jihad.” In fact, HLF was housed for a time at ISNA’s Indiana offices, and checks were often routed to Hamas through a joint ISNA/NAIT bank account.Ecumenical efforts at outreach and interfaith prayer services are one thing, and to be encouraged from time to time, but to invite representatives from known radical Islamic terror groups to take over your prayer space when they have their own worship spaces is quite another.Good Lord! November 11, 2014 at 6:25 pm I’ve had enough. I am now an Anglican. This confirms my decision. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Danny Anderson says: Brad Howard says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET November 12, 2014 at 9:46 am Is it still the case that possession of a Bible and sharing Christian prayers/belief is a seriously punishable offense in Saudi Arabia, Iran, and elsewhere? I know that I have been denied entry to mosques in Indonesia, Israel, the Philippines, Africa. Possibly this has changed but I have not heard so. While reciprocity of religious freedom is not a mandate it does seem like an essential foundation, in some way, for building these interfaith connections. Is there any effort by a group from National Cathedral to hold prayer in such locales? The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release November 12, 2014 at 2:05 am I have a concern concerning security. The webcast can be viewed also by by those of the Islamic faith who are militant. Will they view their non-militant brethren as “infidels” thereby putting them potentially in harms way? Is the National Cathedral putting itself at potential risk by hosting such an event and has that been discussed? It is sad, but there are evil people in this world set upon doing bad things. I also have other concerns about this event but they have been well articulated above and elaboration on my part would serve only as repetition. November 12, 2014 at 3:02 pm I agree with Zachary. It’s inappropriate to use a place of worship consecrated for Christian worship for worship of any other faith. Rector Collierville, TN Brian Cherry says: November 11, 2014 at 6:42 pm I think this is awesome. I’m going to go to show my support. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Jane Picardi says: Brad Howard says: Larry Quisenberry says: December 3, 2014 at 8:21 pm It is worth remembering that Allah is simply the Arabic word for God. Arab Christians use it to refer to Our Lord as well. While I may be incorrect, I believe they were using it long before Islam existed. Miguel Rosada says: Kevin Miller says: November 11, 2014 at 8:01 pm I often work with people of other religions (and no religion at all) on areas of common concern. It would never occur to me to ask to hold a Christian rite in a mosque out if respect; I can’t imagine any Episcopalian being so thoughtless as to make that request. By the same token, I expect the same respect towards the sacred places of my religion by people of other faiths. This decision goes beyond ecumenical cooperation and crosses a line. Islam and Christianity teach mutually exclusive things. I think this is a very poor decision that reflects poorly on the church and underscores our inability to articulate anything meaningful about our religious identity. It is no accident that TEC is in decline while Islam is on the ascendancy. There is a snake in our garden saying some things that are clearly, bright-line wrong. John David Spangler says: Muslim Friday prayers to be offered at Washington National Cathedral Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Lisa Hlass says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York November 14, 2014 at 8:37 am Dear Bob T. and all the nay-sayers, I am proud to be part of the Blessed Company that is the Episcopal Church. A member for all of my 85 years, I am prouder to-day because of Janet McMannis, Lisa Hlass, Daniel Prechtel, Canon Campbell, and the Cathedral. I give thanks fro them and pray that the nay-sayers. Peace! Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Zachary Brooks says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Washington National Cathedral] Washington National Cathedral and five Muslim groups have announced that the first celebration of Muslim Friday prayers (Jumaa) at the cathedral will be observed on Friday, Nov. 14.“Leaders believe offering Muslim prayers at the Christian cathedral shows more than hospitality,” according to a cathedral media advisory. “It demonstrates an appreciation of one another’s prayer traditions and is a powerful symbolic gesture toward a deeper relationship between the two Abrahamic traditions.”The prayers will be held between 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. and will be attended by the Rev. Canon Gina Campbell, director of liturgy for Washington National Cathedral, South African Ambassador Ebrahim Rasool, Masjid Muhammad of The Nation’s Mosque,and representatives from the All Dulles Area Muslim Society, Council on American-Islamic Relations, Islamic Society of North America, Muslim Public Affairs Council.The opportunity grew out of a “trusted relationship” between Campbell and Rasool, who met while planning the national memorial service for Nelson Mandela, the advisory said.“Deep relationships come out of prayer,” said Campbell. “Different connections come out of being in prayer — beyond the political or academic.”Rasool thanked Campbell for the cathedral’s generous offer to use Friday prayers as a beginning to a deeper conversation and partnership. “This is a dramatic moment in the world and in Muslim-Christian relations,” said Rasool. “This needs to be a world in which all are free to believe and practice and in which we avoid bigotry, Islamaphobia, racism, anti-Semitism, and anti-Christianity and to embrace our humanity and to embrace faith.”The cathedral has welcomed Muslims in the past, often at interfaith services and events, as well as at the Interfaith Conference of Greater Washington’s annual concert and specific programs such as the 2008 Ramadan Iftar at the Cathedral College. But this is the first time the cathedral has invited Muslims to come and lead their own prayers in a space known as a house of prayer for all people.Planners hope that the people around the world will take note of this service and the welcome extended by the cathedral so that Muslims everywhere will adopt a reciprocal welcome of Christians by Muslims.The prayers will be offered in the north transept, an area of the cathedral with arches and limited iconography that provide an ideal space — almost mosque-like — with the appropriate orientation for Muslim prayers.The prayers will also be webcast live from the cathedral’s website. Janet McMannis says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC November 14, 2014 at 10:27 am This all seems very strange to me as a form of ecumenical outreach. A joint Interfaith service would be more appropriate in my opinion, and the Cathedral’s announcement said there have been some such services in the past. To have an Islam-specific service within a Christian space, absent a possible legitimate form of hospitality such as because a mosque’s building had a disaster or something and needed a large space temporarily, seems like an odd way to promote ecumenism or hospitality. The two religions are very different theologically. There is no need for an Islamic worship service (ordinarily) in a Christian space, nor a Christian worship service (ordinarily) in a mosque. The other commenters make some valid points, and it begs the question… when will we have a Buddhist-only service, or Hindu-only, or Jewish-only? And… why have them? This will send waves of confusion around the world, not healing.last_img read more

Jennings re-elected President of the House of Deputies unopposed

Jennings re-elected President of the House of Deputies unopposed

first_img President of the House of Deputies Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings was re-elected president of the House of Deputies unopposed during a legislative session June 26. Photo: Janet Kawamoto/Diocese of Los Angeles[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] With cheers, shouts and a standing ovation from deputies June 26, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings was re-elected president of the House of Deputies.“It’s been one of the greatest privileges of my life to serve the House of Deputies and The Episcopal Church I love so much,” said Jennings, the first ordained woman to hold the position.In a procedural move because she was unopposed for the office, Jennings yielded the chair to deputies’ vice president Byron Rushing on the second legislative day of the 78th General Convention, meeting June 25-July 3 in Salt Lake City.She said the Joint Committee on Nominations had presented their nominations and the floor was open for additional names for a variety of church offices, according to the rules of order. Deputies will stand for election Sunday, June 28, Jennings said.The Rev. Ernesto Medina, deputy from Nebraska, said Jennings “in a really graceful way, turned the chair over to Byron Rushing the vice president and asked us to refer to him as ‘Mr. President.’ He took the chair and she disappeared. Then he started through the process of nomination for the president of the House of Deputies,” Medina told Episcopal News Service.The chair of Dispatch of Business, the Rev. Jim Simons, deputy from Pittsburgh, offered a motion to suspend the rules and to hold the election immediately. Jennings was overwhelmingly elected by voice vote.“We all applauded and offered a standing ovation,” said Canon Janet Wylie, deputy from Los Angeles. “It was not a surprise because she was unopposed, but she needed to compose herself before taking the chair again.”Jennings said she looks forward to working with the new presiding bishop, who will be elected Saturday, June 27. “It’s a great privilege to be elected by my friends and colleagues, by my fellow deputies in the House of Deputies,” she said.“There’s a great spirit in the House right now,” said Jennings. “They’re open to change, to trying new things. Nearly half are first-time deputies; there are many younger deputies. We even have a Twitter page for people on the floor of the House of Deputies.”Among her future tasks, she believes, will be “to evaluate the many changes that we’ve instituted in the House of Deputies and then to build on those changes and to see how these work out at this convention. We’re doing a lot of new things, from new rules of order, the iPads, the virtual binders, so we’ll have a lot to evaluate at the end of convention and to build on that.”She added that, “the whole point of all the changes is to improve legislative efficiency, and to give the house more time to have conversation and debate about what’s most important.”She said the three joint sessions with the House of Bishops is just one of many great things happening at the 78th General Convention.Jennings’s second term begins July 3, at the conclusion of convention. She can serve three consecutive terms or a total of nine years, she said.Medina said he is thrilled that Jennings “continues to be president of the House of Deputies. She has shown consistent, strong leadership. She loves the church, and that’s just very apparent, and she really cares about us in the House of Deputies, and she cares about mission and getting the work done for Jesus.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC General Convention 2015, Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 26, 2015 Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Jennings re-elected President of the House of Deputies unopposed Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA General Convention, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Debate continues on confirmation in New Zealand

Debate continues on confirmation in New Zealand

first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] The traditional Anglican initiation rite of confirmation has “lost its pivotal role” for many Anglican churches in New Zealand, a report to this month’s General Synod of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia said. But proposals to replace it with a new rite of The Laying on of Hands for Affirmation, Renewal and Reception, were postponed to allow further consultation.A bill containing the new rite, together with proposed new formularies for the baptism of adults and the baptism of children, were let to “lie on the table” when the Synod met earlier this month.The report accompanying the bill said that the changes in the understanding and status of confirmation has mainly occurred since the 1970s when baptism became the sole rite required for Christians to receive communion in Anglican churches in the country.“This work on confirmation has identified a crisis in our church,” the Rev. Michael Wallace from Dunedin said. “But I believe the crisis is not with the rite of confirmation itself, but with our church’s approach to catechesis and formation.”The Rev. Anne van Gend, director of Anglican Schools, opposed any shift from confirmation, saying that “Confirmation is an important rite of passage for our students and I am loathed to see anything that would weaken that.”Bishop of Waikato Helen-Ann Hartley spoke of the long-standing, worldwide role of confirmation in the Anglican Communion. “I would hate to see it go,” she said, “there are deep historic and pastoral aspects to confirmation.”But other speakers supported the changes. Assistant Bishop of Auckland Jim White, who had completed the research leading to the proposals on behalf of the house of bishops, said that there was little in the concerns and questions that suggested a present-day rationale for confirmation.“‘That is our tradition’ is not sufficient answer, nor that ‘it is in the Book of Common Prayer’,” he said. “We have jettisoned other parts of the Book of Common Prayer.“We no longer hold to the same view or doctrine on baptism and that is key. “There is nothing to ‘confirm’.”The dioceses and hui amorangi (the areas of the Maori part of the Province) have been asked to discuss the report on baptism and confirmation over the next two years and report back to the liturgical committee ahead of the next General Synod in 2018.This article is based on a more detailed report by Anglican Taonga. Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Posted May 26, 2016 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Debate continues on confirmation in New Zealand Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

A trabajar: Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas comienza la labor del…

A trabajar: Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas comienza la labor del…

first_imgA trabajar: Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas comienza la labor del presupuesto trienal El comité de la Convención General recibe palabras de aliento y un contexto para hacer su tarea. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Executive Council October 2017, Barbara Miles, presidente del Comité Permanente Conjunto de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas de la Convención General hace una lista de los subcomités en que los miembros se dividirán para examinar a fondo el presupuesto 2019-21. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] El Comité Permanente Conjunto de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas de la Iglesia Episcopal o PB&F (por su sigla en inglés) ha comenzado su tarea después de muchos meses de trabajo que dará lugar al presupuesto 2019-21 que se le propondrá a la 79ª. Convención General en julio de 2018.Los miembros de la PB&F pasaron la mayor parte de su reunión del 21 al 23 de octubre en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo  haciendo un curso intensivo sobre las finanzas de la Iglesia, la configuración actual del “borrador de trabajo del presupuesto” diseñado por el Consejo Ejecutivo y las dificultades a que tanto el Consejo como el comité se enfrentan para producir un presupuesto balanceado, tal como lo exigen los Cánones, para someterlo a la consideración de la Convención.Hay un déficit de $8 millones en el anteproyecto actual, le dijo al PB&F la Rda. Mally Lloyd, miembro del Comité Permanente Conjunto de Finanzas para la Misión del Consejo o FFM (por su sigla en inglés). La diferencia entre los ingresos que se esperaban y los gastos solicitados por el personal denominacional y los comités permanentes conjuntos del Consejo llegó a sobrepasar los $12 millones cuando el FFM inició su labor en la reunión del Consejo del 18 al 21 de octubre.La versión del anteproyecto o borrador de trabajo del presupuesto del Comité Ejecutivo que el PB&F estudió durante su reunión dista mucho, pero mucho, de ser final.“No es el presupuesto que recibiremos en febrero y no es el presupuesto que propondremos en julio”, advirtió Steve Lane, obispo de la Diócesis de Maine y vicepresidente del PB&F. “No habrá presupuesto hasta que la Convención General decida”.El tesorero y director general de finanzas de la Iglesia Episcopal, N. Kurt Barnes, explica el 22 de octubre las operaciones financieras de la Iglesia a los miembros del Comité Permanente Conjunto de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas de la Convención General. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ ENS.El Comité [del Consejo] de Finanzas para la Misión elabora un anteproyecto del presupuesto para que todo el Consejo lo apruebe y lo remita al PB&F, al cual la Convención General encarga de la elaboración de un proyecto presupuestario más terminado para proponérselo a los obispos y diputados. Ese traspaso del anteproyecto del presupuesto debe tener lugar a principios de febrero de 2018.Lloyd, que también es miembro del PB&F, le dijo al comité el 22 de octubre que el objetivo del Consejo es producir un anteproyecto balanceado del presupuesto, pero, advirtió, el Consejo no está obligado a hacerlo. Lloyd dijo que ella y Tess Judge, presidente del FFM, confían en que puedan “tenerlo bajo control y balancearlo”.“Pero puede haber algún perjuicio al hacer eso”, explicó ella, añadiendo que “hay tantas cosas buenas pasando en ese ministerio que cualquier cosa que salga va a ser realmente de primera calidad”.Tanto el obispo primado Michael Curry como la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings durante la sesión de apertura en la noche del 21 de octubre le agradeció de antemano al comité su disposición a, en palabras de Jennings, “lidiar con el presupuesto que tiene grandes sueños y recursos limitados, y el cual convenimos en confiar unos de otros más de lo que tal vez hemos hecho en muchas décadas”.Jennings dijo que el comité se enfrenta a interrogantes respecto a si “nuestra modesta expectativa de aumento de ingresos [podrá] ser capaz de financiar nuestra esperanza cada vez mayor de una misión y un ministerio a través de toda la Iglesia y más allá” y lo que costará “en otras áreas del ministerio seguir lo que creemos que Dios está llamando a que la Iglesia Episcopal haga en el mundo actual”.Curry situó la labor presupuestaria del comité en un contexto aun más vasto. El mundo, dijo él, está sometido a “cambios profundos”, [en el terreno] religioso, cultural y político.“Hay muchísimo en juego y la Iglesia episcopal en este contexto es importante, significativamente importante”, dijo Curry.“Yo no estaría aquí si no creyera que la Iglesia Episcopal tiene un testimonio, tiene un papel y un mensaje que refleja al Jesús de Nazaret que bien puede adecuarse a estos tiempos”, afirmó el Obispo Primado.Él le dijo al comité que “seguir el camino de Jesús tan bien como podamos discernirlo —para nuestro tiempo, para nuestra Iglesia, en nuestro contexto cultural— es la manera en que la Iglesia Episcopal da su testimonio, deja su huella y es realmente importante”.El PB&F debe esforzarse, dijo Curry, en diseñar un presupuesto que “se parezca al movimiento de Jesús a través de la Iglesia Episcopal en nuestro mundo”.Curry le pidió al comité que honre la promesa de la Escritura de que si un grupo de personas pone a Cristo en su centro, podrán discernir el llamado de Dios.“Hermanos y hermanas, si hacemos eso, eso le enviará una señal a esta Iglesia que tendrá un efecto de onda a través de toda la Iglesia y, a través de la Iglesia, al mundo”, afirmó.Curry luego invitó a los miembros del PB&F a “trabajar” recitando la letra del himno escrito por Jane Laurie Borthwick, con quien Jennings está emparentada.Elaborar el presupuestoLos presupuestos trienales de la Iglesia Episcopal se financian fundamentalmente a partir de las promesas de las 109 diócesis y tres zonas regionales de la Iglesia. La contribución anual de cada año en el presupuesto trienal se basa en el ingreso de una diócesis dos años antes, menos $150.000. Para el presupuesto 2016-18, a las diócesis se les pidió que contribuyeran con un 18 por ciento en 2016, un 16,5 por ciento en 2017 y un 15 por ciento en 2018.Los compromisos diocesanos de 2016 y 2017 se encuentran aquí.No todas las diócesis pagan la solicitud completa por una variedad de razones. Cincuenta y seis diócesis se han comprometido a pagar la totalidad del 16,5 por ciento o más en 2017. Otras 22 se han comprometido a pagar entre el 12 y 15 por ciento.En la reunión de 2015 de la Convención General, los obispos y diputados convirtieron el actual sistema voluntario de solicitud presupuestaria diocesana en obligatorio, a partir del ciclo presupuestario 2019-21, el cual entra en vigor el 1 de enero de 2019. Sin una dispensa, una diócesis que no pague la tasación en su totalidad no tendrá derecho a obtener subvenciones o préstamos de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera.(La Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS) es el nombre legal y canónico con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión).Steve Lane, obispo de la Diócesis de Maine, predica durante la eucaristía del 22 de octubre antes de que el Comité Permanente Conjunto de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas de la Convención General comenzara una jornada completa de estudio sobre el actual anteproyecto del presupuesto 2019-21 de la Iglesia Episcopal. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Jennings dijo que el Comité de Revisión de Evaluaciones, que procesará las solicitudes de dispensa, y todos los que participan en el proceso del presupuesto han prometido tener “gran compasión y empatía por esos casos que se encuentran en apuros”.“Pero también sabemos que existe toda una gama de interpretaciones respecto a lo que significa encontrarse en apuros”, agregó.La versión actual del presupuesto 2019-21 se basa en ingresos previstos de $128,7 millones, que incluyen $86,7 millones en contribuciones obligatorias del 15 por ciento del ingreso anual de las diócesis. El total de las tasaciones diocesanas también asume un 0.5 por ciento de crecimiento en los ingresos operativos anuales de las diócesis.Sin embargo, el anteproyecto actual anticipa que algunas diócesis obtendrán una dispensa total o parcial, hasta un “máximo posible” de $6,8 millones, según Lloyd. Por consiguiente, la probable contribución diocesana se fijará en $79,9 millones. Cada 1 por ciento de la contribución diocesana equivale aproximadamente a $5,8 millones, dijo ella.Jennings hizo notar que la solicitud anual de las diócesis se fijó en 21 por ciento hace cinco años. Ella dijo que el ingreso previsto para [el trienio] 2019-21 se basa en parte en el supuesto de que las diócesis que han estado pagando más que eso reducirán su contribución al 15 por ciento.Las diócesis que pagan menos del 15 por ciento, “¿han pasado los últimos tres años preparándose para hacer este compromiso con nuestra misión y vida en común?” Preguntó Jennings, “El tiempo lo dirá”.Lane dijo que cuando la solicitud, entonces voluntaria, era del 21 por ciento, el porcentaje promedio de las contribuciones reales era de 12,3 por ciento. Un diálogo de varios años dio lugar a “un amplio acuerdo a través de la Iglesia de que el 15 por ciento es un objetivo razonable”, afirmó. El patrón de contribución diocesana para el trienio 2016-18 muestra que muchas de las diócesis que contribuían menos se están acercando al 15 por ciento, puntualizó Lane.“Hay todavía unas cuantas diócesis que no van a llegar al 15 por ciento, pero muchas de ellas se están esforzando por lograrlo de buena fe”, añadió.Jennings dijo que para que el PB&F “haga proyecciones sólidas respecto a los ingresos en este presupuesto, ustedes tienen que decidir si confiamos los unos en los otros para mantener el compromiso que hicimos en la última Convención General”.La presidente del PB&F, Barbara Miles, dijo que ella espera que los miembros del comité “considerarán esto como un ministerio y no simplemente como un trabajo”.“Nuestra tarea es escuchar y ser amables. No intente discutir con ellos. Sencillamente escúchelos. Luego, intentaremos hacer el trabajo del presupuesto aquí”, recalcó ella.Al tiempo de concluir la reunión el 23 de octubre, Miles y Lane les pidieron a los miembros del PB&F que resumieran sus objetivos para el proceso.El obispo William Stokes (“Chip”) de la Diócesis de Nueva Jersey hizo notar que los comités del presupuesto con frecuencia incurren en banalidades” movidos por la necesidad.“Pero yo estoy comprometido con un presupuesto basado en Jesucristo que no acepta un relato de decadencia para la Iglesia, que está motivado por nuestro compromiso con la misión y el ministerio de Jesucristo, la misión y el ministerio de reconciliación que el mundo necesita desesperadamente”, dijo él.Los miembros del comité asintieron con la cabeza mientras él añadía: “Espero que todas las decisiones, todo lo que miremos, esté motivado por ese interés”.El Comité Permanente Conjunto de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas de la Convención General tiene 27 miembros, un obispo y dos miembros de la Cámara de Diputados, laicos o clérigos, de cada una de las nueve provincias de la Iglesia. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ ENSHe aquí los próximos pasos en el proceso del presupuestoEl Comité de Finanzas para la Misión (FFM por su sigla en inglés) dará a conocer su anteproyecto [o borrador de trabajo] a la Iglesia junto con un texto que explique sus supuestos y elaboración a mediados de noviembre con vistas a recibir comentarios. Probablemente aparecerá en el sitio web de la Oficina de la Convención General.El FFM revisará el presupuesto basado en los comentarios de los miembros del Consejo, del PB&F y de toda la Iglesia, y tendrá listo un anteproyecto del presupuesto para someterlo a la consideración del Consejo durante su reunión del 22 al 24 de enero de 2018.Según las reglas conjuntas de la Convención General (II.10.c.ii), el Consejo debe entregarle su anteproyecto del presupuesto al PB&F no menos de cuatro meses antes del comienzo de la Convención General (esencialmente para febrero del año de la Convención). El PB&F se reunirá del 5 al 7 de febrero de 2018 para comenzar a trabajar en el anteproyecto del presupuesto.El anteproyecto del presupuesto del Consejo también se le da a conocer a la Iglesia.El PB&F se vale del anteproyecto del presupuesto y de cualquier legislación aprobada o sometida a la consideración de la Convención General para crear una propuesta presupuestaria final. Los comités legislativos de la Convención y el PB&F comenzarán reuniéndose en Austin, Texas, el 3 de julio de 2018, antes de la reunión del 5 al 13 de julio de la Convención en la ciudad capital de Texas. Habrá al menos una audiencia abierta, programada actualmente para la noche del 5 de julio.El presupuesto del PB&F debe presentarse a una sesión conjunta de las cámaras de Obispos y de Diputados a más tardar el tercer día antes del programado para la clausura de la Convención. Según el borrador del programa de la Convención, esa presentación ha de tener lugar a las 10:30 P.M. del 11 de julio (hora del Centro).Las dos cámaras luego debatirán y votarán el presupuesto por separado. Ambas cámaras deben aprobar la misma versión del presupuesto, que entrará en vigor a principios de 2019.El Consejo Ejecutivo elabora presupuestos anuales a partir del plan de gastos que la Convención General aprueba como presupuesto trienal. Normalmente, el Consejo ajusta cada uno de los tres presupuestos anuales en base a los cambiantes ingresos y egresos.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es jefa de redacción interina de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. 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RIP: Former South Dakota Bishop John Tarrant

RIP: Former South Dakota Bishop John Tarrant

first_imgRIP: Former South Dakota Bishop John Tarrant This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC [Diocese of Western Massachusetts] The Rt. Rev. John Thomas Tarrant, former bishop of South Dakota, passed away Aug. 24 of an apparent heart attack, according to a pastoral statement issued by Western Massachusetts Bishop Douglas Fisher. Following his retirement as bishop, Tarrant began serving as an interim at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in May 2019. Tarrant was consecrated bishop coadjutor of the Diocese of South Dakota on Oct. 31, 2009, in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He became diocesan bishop on Feb. 2, 2010.Tarrant was born in Kansas City, Missouri, on Feb. 18, 1952, and raised in rural Michigan. He graduated from Michigan State University in 1974 with a political science degree and received his master of divinity degree from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1983. He has served congregations in Western Massachusetts, Connecticut and South Dakota.1983-1985: Curate, Church of the Atonement, Westfield, Massachusetts;1985-1989: Rector, St. Paul’s, Gardner, Massachusetts;1989-1991: Assistant, St. Paul’s, Holyoke, Massachusetts;1991-1996: Missioner, Greater Waterbury Episcopal Ministry, Middlebury, Connecticut;1996-2005: Rector, St. Paul’s, Stockbridge, Massachusetts;2005-2009: Rector, Trinity Church, Pierre, South Dakota.Upon his retirement as bishop, Tarrant returned to Western Massachusetts.“His pastoral presence was a great blessing to the people of St. Stephen’s. His support of the Cathedral of the Beloved and the under-housed in the city resonated with John’s lifetime commitment to forming ‘beloved community.’ His passion for justice motivated John’s witness at Standing Rock. His humble ministry among indigenous people made John a wonderful storyteller of God’s love for diversity. While this loss is especially local, it is felt churchwide. The House of Bishops mourns John today as we remember a colleague and friend,” wrote Fisher.Tarrant is survived by his wife Pat and their children.A memorial service will be livestreamed on Saturday, August 29, 2020, at 1 p.m. EDT.The Diocese of South Dakota submitted the following:A tribute to the Rt. Rev. John T. Tarrant, Tenth Bishop of South DakotaBy the Very Rev. Ward Simpson, the Rev. David Hussey, et. al.Those who knew the Rt. Rev. John Tarrant knew that he would not be comfortable with praise and acclamations concerning his life or his ministry. He was a humble minister of God who knew he was loved by his creator and wanted you to know that you were likewise loved. But as he is no longer able to tell us not to sing his praise . . .Lists of events or projects that Bishop John Tarrant was involved with would tell you very little about him. This is not because he did not have accomplishments, in fact he had many. But he never did things to be recognized for them. His life, his ministry, his whole being was focused on serving God and caring for God’s people. To know Bishop Tarrant was to be in a relationship first. Any accomplishments that arose from those relationships were secondary in his mind to the relationships themselves. Anyone who ever received a phone call from Bishop Tarrant has heard these words: “Hi, this is John Tarrant. Am I interrupting anything?” He never assumed that what he wanted to talk to you about was more important than what you were doing. This humility exemplified his ministry.Bishop Tarrant cared deeply for the missions and parishes under his care. Many congregations in the diocese experienced this firsthand as Bishop Tarrant would work with them through times of challenge or conflict. Bishop Tarrant also had a deep love of the clergy and people of this Diocese. He often commented that one of the most important things about ministry is simply showing up. Being present with people in their joy and in their sorrow was a vital part of his ministry as priest and as bishop. His official visitation schedule was always full, and visits usually lasted multiple days. He would also make time to visit congregations unofficially whenever need or opportunity presented itself. Many of the clergy of the diocese can share stories of times when Bishop Tarrant would make trips to visit with them and their family. He genuinely enjoyed being with the people of the diocese, and this is when he was at his best. Bishop John understood how to “work a room” in the best sense of that phrase. He would tirelessly make his way around any gathering greeting people, asking about their family or concerns they had shared on earlier occasions, getting to know people he had not met previously. Building and tending relationships.Bishop John was also a tireless advocate for the diocese and for the needs of the people. He built relationships within the House of Bishops and in the larger church in part because building relationships was important to him, but also because he understood that for the ministry of the Diocese of South Dakota to thrive, it needs to be undertaken in partnership with the larger church and especially in partnership with General Convention. At all three General Conventions that occurred during his tenure as Bishop, he took the time to work with the deputation from South Dakota to plan the telling of the story of ministry in South Dakota so that others would see at least some of who we are and what God is doing in our midst. And he would tell the story of ministry in South Dakota to anyone who would listen.But in Bishop Tarrant’s eyes, telling the story was only half the task. The other half was inviting people to come out to South Dakota and experience it themselves. A quote of Bishop Tarrant’s reported by Matthew Townsend expresses this best: “You can paint a sunset, but it’s not the sunset. You need to experience the sunset. You can paint a scene of the prairie, but it is not a prairie. Until you come and sit on a prairie and you listen, and you smell, and you are present, you don’t fully understand.” Bishop Tarrant wanted people to come to South Dakota and experience for themselves. He wanted people to build relationships because he knew that these relationships, grounded in faith, grounded in God, would change the world.Niobrara Convocation, the 147-year old, multiple-day gathering of Lakota/Dakota Episcopalians, was always a favorite event in the year for Bishop Tarrant. When asked what it was about Convocation that he found so enjoyable he replied that in his experience it was the one event in the church that was not about doing something. It was about being with people, getting together and sharing the stories of our ministries and our lives with one another. It is these deep connections that were most important to Bishop John.In his life, John fought the good fight of faith and he has now finished his course with joy. May he rest in peace and rise in glory.“Go into the world in peace. Be of good cheer. Fight the good fight of faith that you might finish your course with joy. And the blessing of God, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit be with you and those you love, always.” -The Rt. Rev. 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