Tag: 上海楼凤

AddRan dean focuses on providing ‘top-notch’ education this semester

AddRan dean focuses on providing ‘top-notch’ education this semester

first_imgAlexandra Preusser Linkedin Director of baseball operations shares her journey into sports Alexandra Preusserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexandra-preusser/ Twitter Previous articleFort Worth votes to increase the police budget, add more unarmed officersNext articleWhat we’re reading: Romney sides with Republicans on Supreme Court vote, tropical storm brings dangerous floods to Texas Alexandra Preusser RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Welcome TCU Class of 2025 + posts Alexandra Preusser is a sophomore journalism major and business minor from Wilmington, North Carolina. She has worked with TCU360 as a sports journalist. She is also an intern with the TCU Athletics Communications Department. Facebook Reed Hall is where the physical Writing Center is located. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer) Facebook Drive-thru COVID-19 vaccination site to open Saturday outside of Amon G. Carter Stadium Alexandra Preusserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexandra-preusser/ Twitter Alexandra Preusserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexandra-preusser/ TCU Gives Day raises money for scholarships and department funds TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Cap and gown shipments delayed, off-color versions handed out for 2020, 2021 graduates ReddIt Alexandra Preusserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexandra-preusser/ Linkedin ReddIt printThis story was updated at 10 a.m. Sept. 23 to include information about AddRan College’s enrollment and degree offerings. The newest dean at TCU is focused on providing a quality education for students and increasing the number of faculty of color. Dr. Sonja S. Watson was hired as the new dean of the AddRan College of Liberal Arts shortly before COVID-19 shut down TCU’s campus last spring. Read Here: AddRan announces new deanAddRan College is one of the largest on campus, with more than 1,700 undergraduate and graduate students as of fall 2019, according to the 2019 Fact Book. The college offers 117 undergraduate, 65 master’s level and 38 doctoral programs. Before the pandemic hit, Watson said she looked to focus on conveying the value of a liberal arts education and enhancing AddRan College’s diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) efforts in her role as dean. Watson plans on building on AddRan College’s “Make Your Major Work” program, which prepares students to enter the job market and show their marketable skills. In addition, she said she plans to start a leadership program for a cohort of students called AddRan Ambassadors. This program would allow students to serve as ambassadors of the liberal arts at TCU while developing their own leadership skills. Dr. Sonja S. Watson (Photo courtesy of the AddRan College of Liberal Arts)Watson is also planning an initiative to hire more faculty of color as she works on enhancing AddRan College’s DEI. “Further, I will launch two college-wide diversity, equity, and inclusion committees, one for faculty/staff and the other for students, to further incorporate DEI in to AddRan to recruit and retain students and enhance the student perspective,” Watson said. The pandemic and its effect on TCU made Watson add on to her initial goals. “Due to the pandemic, my main priority has been to ensure that students are provided with a top-notch education whether they are taught face-to-face or online,” Watson said.Watson’s official start date was May 29, but she was able to attend the TCU Connected Campus meetings beforehand, helping prepare her for the challenges ahead. Even in the midst of a pandemic, Watson has still had a welcoming start to her new role.“As someone new to TCU, that says a lot about the culture at TCU and the warm environment,” Dr. Waston said. “As a result, I already feel a part of the Horned Frog family.” World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution last_img read more

Limerick coffee morning to honour a tireless supporter

Limerick coffee morning to honour a tireless supporter

first_imgWalk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Advertisement Linkedin NewsLimerick coffee morning to honour a tireless supporterBy Staff Reporter – July 2, 2013 647 TAGSCARIfeatured Twitter Shannondoc operating but only by appointment First Irish death from Coronavirus Email Surgeries and clinic cancellations extendedcenter_img Print Facebook Live95 CARI’s on Helping Limerick Children No vaccines in Limerick yet RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR CARI, the support group for children who have suffered sexual abuse, will hold a coffee morning on Friday July 5 in memory of Limerick woman Anne Byrnes who was one of its most ardent supporters.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Until her death last September, Anne Byrnes was the face of CARI in Limerick and had dedicated much of her life helping the children who attended the local support centre. Her colleagues have created a remembrance space in the garden at the centre in her memory.This is an opportunity for Anne’s family, friends and work colleagues to come together to remember her and to acknowledge the enormous contribution she made to CARI and how she impacted on all their lives.Acting National Clinical Director Majella Ryan said “Anne was thoughtful and kind. She was always optimistic and enthusiastic – in particular regarding the work of CARI. Anne fought her illness bravely. Her tireless work ethic, positive attitude and sense of humour are greatly missed. She fundraised tirelessly, even from her bed at Milford Hospice. When we would bring her out in her wheelchair, she would talk to the doctors, nurses, other patients and their families about CARI and ask for their support.” Previous articleDromcollogher 4mile raceNext articleLimerick pride of place nominations Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie WhatsApplast_img read more

Bombers shot down in Okanagan

Bombers shot down in Okanagan

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers felt what it was like to be kicked around as the Kootenay squad struggled mightily at the Fulton Maroons High School Boy’s Basketball Tournament this past weekend in Vernon.The shorthanded Bombers were outscored by a 2-to-1 margin in three games against Okanagan AA competition.“It definitely was a tough weekend,” said Bomber coach Jeremy Phelan.“But on the positive side, it was nice to see our senior players be vocal on the court and lead by example.”Phelan, a Bomber grad and part of the two-time provincial champion team from LVR and Trafalgar, was talking about seniors Bjorn Morris, Tobin Eberle and Ethan Perkins.All three Bombers worked from tip-off to buzzer despite being shelled by stronger Okanagan teams. Against host Fulton, LVR lost 97-66.Perkins finished with 16 points while Morris added 15.Perkins, finishing with 12 points, continued his strong play during a shellacking at the hands of Kalamalka Lakers, 88-32.In the final game, against Sahali of Kamloops, the Bombers lost 89-51.Perkins again had 16 points to lead the Bombers.LVR played the tournament without a full roster as sickness and player commitments depleted the squad heading to the Okanagan.The Bombers get right back on the horse this weekend as the club travels to Golden to compete in the Kicking Horse Classic.LVR is slotted into a pool with Cranbrook’s Mount Baker Wild and Selkirk Storm of Kimberley.The final is set for 4 p.m. Saturday.last_img read more

Slackpacking in the Cederberg

Slackpacking in the Cederberg

first_imgThe magnificent mountainous region of the Cederberg. (Image: South African Tourism) The Cederberg scenery can change dramatically, dropping down sharply into green, vegetated kloofs. (Image: South African Tourism) Rock art found in the Cederberg. (Image: South African Tourism) While it may have lessened the load the hikers had to carry, the donkey cart didn’t ensure a complete lack of discomfort. (Image: Shaen Adey)Fiona McintoshI’m an avid hiker, but as I’ve got older – no, let’s not been so harsh – wiser and more mature, I’ve found the logistics of multi-day hiking in South Africa somewhat taxing.Much as I love escaping to the wilderness for a few days, the thought of cramming my tent, sleeping bag, clothes and dehydrated rather than “proper” food into my rucksack (for a foodie like me the worst sacrifice) and then lugging it on my back for the duration of the trail, is almost guaranteed to put me off.So it was with some delight that I discovered a clutch of new multi-day hiking trails where your bags are transported between overnight spots while you walk with just your camera, lunch and a waterproof in your daypack.Slackpacking“Slackpacking”, as this refined form of hiking is coined, has long been popular in the US, New Zealand and Europe but has only caught on in South Africa in the last decade. But its growth has been fast and there are now at least 30 slackpacking trails in the country. Most are along spectacular sections of the coastline, but a few criss-cross mountain wilderness areas that were previously the preserve of only the fit and self-sufficient, khaki-shorted, hardy hiker.The latest addition to the fold is the Cederberg Heritage Route (CHR). In common with many other slackpacking trails, the CHR is much more than just a hiking trail. The guided three- to five-day route options include cultural visits and rock art tours.It offers unique Cederberg experiences that give the visitor an exceptional insight into the spectacular natural and cultural landscape of this remote corner of the Cape Floral Region World Heritage Site.Back into the pastOn day one, however, I was questioning my choice of trail. Our group, mainly in their 50s, had spent a delightful morning exploring the rock art sites of the Jan Dissels River Valley. David Swart, a local guide trained up as part of Clanwilliam’s Living Landscape Project, was passionate about his job and could barely control his enthusiasm for the paintings.He bounded from site to site, squatting down to show us ochre-coloured eland, tiny outlines of fat-tailed sheep, and the distinctive depictions of shamans and explaining the trance scenes and the pressure points.He took us back a couple of millennia to when San and, later, Khoi people lived in this beautiful valley; made us stand out at the edge of the shelters so as to understand importance of aspect in the choice of sacred sites and cave dwellings and captivated us with the rich heritage of the Cederberg.It was a pleasant, leisurely walk, and by the time we’d retraced our steps and driven the short distance to the lunch-stop at the grave of Louis Leipoldt (a famous local poet, doctor botanist and cook), we had shaken off the stresses of the city and were enjoying the pace of life in the mountains.Then came the donkey cart ride. It sounded innocuous enough, a sedate transfer from the top of the Pakhuis Pass some 12km down the 4×4 track to Heuningvlei, one of the old mission villages nestled under the towering Krakadouw Peak. Once the donkeys had been rounded up and harnessed, we clambered onto the traditional wooden carts and waved David goodbye.Hanging on for dear lifeThe donkey cart is still the main form of transport in the area and the three pairs in the train clearly knew the ropes. But it was not all smooth going. Potholes had developed in the sandy track following a bout of unusually severe winter rain, so the initial uphill stage was far from smooth, while the descents were quite terrifying as the donkeys, knowing that they were homeward bound, chafed at the bit.Our toothless driver attempted to slow us down occasionally by ramming his foot on the brake – a piece of old car tyre attached to the back wheels – but it was obvious, if unnerving, that he was perfectly comfortable with the pace.We hung on for dear life, knuckles white as we bounced up and down on the cushions covering the hard wooden benches, hoping that the donkeys could canter faster than the cart’s gathering momentum. At the bottom of each hill the pace would slacken allowing our thumping hearts to calm down before the next charge.It was exhilarating stuff and we arrived at Heuningvlei in need of a stiff drink. The thorough pre-trip notes had warned that there was no alcohol to be had in the mission villages, so we’d secreted some whisky (and a couple of wine boxes) in our bags. Under the circumstances, it was a wise precaution – this is, after all, a trail for those who like life’s spoils.Home comfortsOur luggage was unloaded and Anna Ockhuis welcomed us into her home, one of the community guesthouses that accommodate hikers. Although new to the game, and by no means fluent in English, the villagers have embraced this new venture and what they lack in sophistication, they more than make up for in warm hospitality.The Cederberg has a couple of basic stone huts in the wilderness area but until the trail was developed there was nothing more comfortable. Now, as we were experiencing, you can hike all day and arrive at a village to find a cup of tea, hot shower, wholesome meal and a soft bed waiting.In keeping with the aims of the trail – to spread the benefits wide – our chefs, Rene Veloen and her mum Helena Ockhuis (the Ockhuis’ were the original farm owners and every second person we met seemed to carry the surname), were from different households and they appeared soon after our arrival to ask what time we’d like to dine.Supper arrived on the dot – a vast meal of meatballs, chicken, braaivleis, boerewors sweet potatoes, a local specialty sous bonntjies (beans in curry sauce) and fresh salad presented by our beaming chefs. I’d stated that I was vegetarian and was impressed by the varied offerings. There was always a tasty tuna bake, macaroni cheese or vegetable hotpot laid out.Helena giggled when we asked what the rich sponge dessert was. “I call it telephone pudding,” she explained. “It’s so quick to make that I can do it in the space of a phone call.”On the Wuppertal trailFrom Heuningvlei, the routes diverge with hikers on the five-day Wuppertal trail spending the next day either hiking or swimming among the incredible rock formations, rare cedar trees and wild flowers or, if they are strong hikers, scaling Krakadouw Peak for its spectacular views. They then spend a second night at Heuningvlei before continuing on the trail, via the village of Brugkraal, down to the Moravian Midssion village of Wuppertal, the oldest settlement in the region.Our route led up from behind the village to Krakadouw Pass. It was a magnificent hike. Our guide, Joey – you guessed it – Ockhuis, has lived in the valley all his life. He took us to a rock shelter with some poorly-preserved paintings where one of his friends had lived for 35 years while working on the road to Pakhuis Pass. We’d come down that road the previous day and he pointed out a well-preserved stone canal system, which carried water to what had been the garden.We stopped for a quick break at the stone hikers’ hut at base of Krakadouw Peak, wishing that we had the extra day to scramble up to its craggy summit, and then headed on up to the neck. The path steepened, but was surprisingly well maintained with stone steps and rainwater channels.A diverse landscapeThe great walls of Krakadouw rose above us punctuating the deep blue sky, and at the saddle the exposed, weathered sandstone rocks were a burnt orange – a stunning backdrop to the clusters of purple and pink everlastings.Once over the pass, the scenery changed dramatically. We dropped down sharply into a green, vegetated kloof and enjoyed the shade provided by stands of yellowwoods. Joey held out some small plants for us to taste – yum yums – a sweet, refreshing clover. After a couple of hours the gradient eased off and a round fort came into view on the ridge above us.“The British built this blockhouse in 1901 during the Anglo-Boer War,” Joey told us. We had no idea that the troops had penetrated so far into this mountainous terrain.Below us we could see the Boskloof cottages and the end of the trail. We sauntered along the river, enjoying the sunshine and the yellow daisies. Although no walk in the park, the pace and terrain of the hiking section had not caused our averagely-fit group any problems.Our celebratory braai that night, in Klein Boschkloof, a delightful guesthouse on a citrus farm, was under a star-studded sky the like of which I have never seen. The Cederberg is only two hours from Cape Town yet there was not a single artificial light to be seen. It’s a rare privilege to venture so deep into the mountains and to experience life in the communities. It had been a very, very special trail.For reservations contact Cederberg African Travel, tel +27 (0) 27 482 2444, email [email protected] or visit www.cedheroute.co.za.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected] McIntosh is the author of Slackpacking: A Guide to South Africa’s Top Leisure Trails, published by Sunbird. Related articlesUnforgettable South African hiking trails The adventure starts here South Africa’s tourist highlights World heritage in South Africa Useful linksCederberg Heritage Traillast_img read more

2005 ASICS NTL- SENIORS DAY THREE SUMMARY

2005 ASICS NTL- SENIORS DAY THREE SUMMARY

first_imgWell, day three at the 2005 Asics Seniors NTL has been long but good. We kicked off at 7:30am Friday morning and didn’t finish games until 10:00pm Friday night. After Thursday’s storm action, we had drizzle all day, had to move games from the main arena to preserve the muddy surface and give it time to dry out before finals and got to watch a beautiful sunset as the lights came on and we had some great night Touch. The day was action packed, with special mention going to retiring Australian Touch CEO Bill Ker (or Sonny Bill Ker as he’s now known). Bill pulled on the boots and slipped into the ACT uniform to help out a side hit hard by injuries. It was his first appearance playing at the NTL, having always been involved as an administrator. What a way to go out Sonny Bill! (Pictured here.) Summary of day three: MENS 30’s: After the final round of competition in the Mens 30’s, the Mets and Sharks finished on top of the ladder, with no losses but a draw against each other. With the Scorpions no more than one or two touchdowns behind those two sides, the finals are sure to be hot. In Saturday’s semis the Mets will face the Scorpions and the Sharks will meet the Mets, guaranteeing a certain NSW v Qld style grand final. The Cyclones are the only side yet to win a match in the Mens 30’s and will be looking to topple the Crusaders in their 8th-9th play off and finish with a match against the Warriors for 7th place. MENS 35’s: In the Mens 35’s the Sydney Scorpions and Mets are looking very tough to go past, although the Sharks and the Cyclones round up the top four and are lurking as the outside chances. The Sharks have been slightly inconsistent though, their 3-2 win over the Mets followed by a 7-6 loss to the Hornets. Other quality matches on day three of the Mens 35’s included the Rustlers 4-3 win over the Warriors and the Mets 4-2 win over the Cyclones. MENS 40’s: The Mens 40’s had a massive day of competition, not finishing until 10pm due to the cancellation of their matches the previous day. It looks like it will be an action packed competition, as the Scorpions, Sharks and Suns are all tightly packed at the top of the ladder and the Northern Eagles not far behind. The Northern Eagles are defending Champions, so they can be expected to put in a solid performance come semi finals times. The Scorpions will face the Eagles and the Sharks will play the Suns. MENS 45’s: The Cobras have been the outstanding side of the Mens 45’s, only allowing 7 touchdowns to be scored against them, with three of those being from their match against the ACT (led by the mighty Sonny Bill Ker, ATA retiring CEO who stepped in to make a final appearance for the last few matches, as the ACT side has been decimated by injuries.) The Mets, Scorpions and Eagles look like they could be the only sides who will challenge the defense of the Cobras, who are still looking as fresh as they did on day one amazingly. The Cobras will face the Eagles and the Mets will face the Scorpions in the Mens 45’s semi finals. MENS 50’s: The Mens 50’s were among the last to leave Coffs Stadium Friday night, with their matches finishing after 9pm. It was certainly a tough night for the Mens 50’s, with the weather and wind being cold, although the atmosphere under lights is always something special. Being the end of a very long day and quite late at night, amny of their final round of pool matches were low scoring affairs, the Eagles winning 6-0 over the Rustlers, Cyclones 4-0 over the Suns, Sharks 4-0 over the Cobras and Mets 2-1 over Hornets. The Mets will face the Sharks in the first semi final, while the Hornets will meet the local Northern Eagles. WOMENS 30’s: The Crusaders and Scorpions look the side to beat in this division, their 3-3 draw earlier in the competition leaving them on top of the ladder together. Their strong record puts them straight through to the semi finals, with the other sides forced into qualifying finals for the final two spots in the semis Friday night. The qualifying system looks complicated, but basically the remaining sides, the Suns, Mets, Cobras and Rustlers are fighting for the two remaining spots in the Semi finals. WOMENS 35’s: The Womens 35’s competition may only have five teams but it is certainly tough. The Cyclones and Rustlers played off for the final spot in the final four, with the Cyclones, yet to win a match all tournament, defeating the Rustlers 1-0. They now go through to a semi final against the Hornets, while the Suns will face the Sharks. WOMENS 40’s: The Sydney Scorpions finished top of their pool with four wins and a draw, with the draw against the third placed Cyclones indicating the Eagles (finishing second,) the Scorpions and Cyclones all have more than just a fingertip on the title. The Scorpions will face the Cobras in the first semi final, while the Eagles play the Cyclones.last_img read more

Remaining West Kingston Claimants Implored to Come Forward

Remaining West Kingston Claimants Implored to Come Forward

first_imgStory Highlights Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, is encouraging the remaining 148 claimants who suffered damage and losses as a result of the 2010 West Kingston security operations to urgently come forward to claim their share of $21 million in compensation. Providing an update in the House of Representatives on January 23, the Minister said persons are being asked to visit the Restorative Justice centres in Tivoli Gardens and Denham Town with their banking information to ensure they get their compensation on time. Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, is encouraging the remaining 148 claimants who suffered damage and losses as a result of the 2010 West Kingston security operations to urgently come forward to claim their share of $21 million in compensation.Providing an update in the House of Representatives on January 23, the Minister said persons are being asked to visit the Restorative Justice centres in Tivoli Gardens and Denham Town with their banking information to ensure they get their compensation on time.“Any amount not disbursed at the end of March 2018 will revert to the Consolidated Fund,” the Minister pointed out.Mr. Chuck informed that a total of 447 recommendations for monetary compensations were made, and as at January 12, 2018, the Justice Ministry paid out a total sum of $178 million to approximately 270 claimants directly and a further 29 through the Administrator General’s Department (AGD).Regarding judgement debts, the Minister noted that as of January 23, the Ministry paid out 99 per cent of the principal sums that were awarded and referred up to November 2017.“During the fiscal year, the Ministry of Finance provided the Justice Ministry with a total of $849 million, of which $705 million has already been paid. A balance of approximately $144 million remains on account to pay judgement debts,” he said.He acknowledged that the delay in completing the payments is as a result of the lack of banking details, trustee information and original formal orders on the files of persons.Mr. Chuck asserted that his Ministry intends to act in strict compliance with the recommendations of the Compensation Committee and, as such, will not be going beyond the recommendations set out in the report.“The Government has done all it can, in keeping with the recommendations and with due process, to offer compensation to persons who had been affected by the unfortunate May 2010 events in West Kingston,” the Minister said. Mr. Chuck informed that a total of 447 recommendations for monetary compensations were made, and as at January 12, 2018, the Justice Ministry paid out a total sum of $178 million to approximately 270 claimants directly and a further 29 through the Administrator General’s Department (AGD). last_img read more

CSA 2020 Scrubbers Are Safe for the Ocean Environment

CSA 2020 Scrubbers Are Safe for the Ocean Environment

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: PxHere under CC0 Creative Commons license The Clean Shipping Alliance 2020 (CSA 2020) has presented results of a three-year study of the composition and quality of exhaust gas cleaning system (EGCS) washwater based on samples taken from cruise ships. The alliance took advantage of the 6th session of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR6) held in London this week – and the presence of member state delegates from across the world – to hold its first technical conference on the topic and present the study.The Carnival-led study collected 281 wash water samples from 53 EGCS-equipped cruise ships, the largest washwater data set in the marine industry, which were then assessed against 54 different test parameters by ISO accredited independent laboratories.The resulting laboratory analysis reports were then evaluated by classification society DNV GL’s Maritime Advisory Services and the data compared against various water quality standards, after first confirming that the samples analysed were consistently well within the allowable IMO criteria and regulatory limits.Then the results were compared to selected national and international water quality standards and land-based wastewater discharge limits.According to CSA 2020, EGCS results “compared favourably with all of these standards.” “Comparing scrubber wash water to various other major water standards is useful to provide perspective and to illustrate EGCS wash water quality in a way that is easy to understand. These comparisons also provide relatable criteria for a number of specific EGCS parameters of interest, such as PAH concentrations, which also have limits within these standards,” Mike Kaczmarek, Carnival’s Senior Vice President for Marine Technology, explained.“Although these are all recognized standards that are designed to regulate other waters, they do provide confirmation of the quality of water that operators of this technology are returning to the sea, and they provide strong support to the IMO’s decision to approve these systems as acceptable means of compliance throughout the world’s regional and 2020 global emission control areas (ECAs),” he added.“We want to emphasise that this major study was intended to provide an objective assessment of the quality of scrubber wash water through a rigorous comparison to other world water quality standards, and it now represents the largest, most credible and verifiable data set available,” Ian Adams, Executive Director, CSA 2020, said.“And importantly, the results reaffirm that exhaust gas cleaning systems are effective and safe for the ocean environment,” Adams concluded.last_img read more

YRB closing Buick Creek Road between 9 am and 3 pm for

YRB closing Buick Creek Road between 9 am and 3 pm for

first_imgMotorists are advised to plan an alternate route during the hours of the road closure.Anyone with concerns can call the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure at (250) 787-3237. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Officials with Yellowhead Road and Bridge say that the Buick Creek Road will be closed for six hours today.YRB North Peace Project Manager Andrew Stewart said that the road will be closed between 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 13th.Stewart also said that there will also be intermittent closures at the Buick Creek multi-plate pipe, between the Beatton Airport Road/Mile 73 Road and the Prespatou Road.last_img read more

Fluoride content in Gurugrams groundwater rose by 17 per cent

Fluoride content in Gurugrams groundwater rose by 17 per cent

first_imgGurugram: Data released by the district public health engineering department (PHED) has stated that the concentration of fluoride in groundwater in Gurugram rose by 17 per cent between 2016 and 2018. Fluoride concentration in Gurugram’s groundwater in 2016 was recorded at 4.7 milligrams per litre (mg/litre). This number rose to 5.5 mg/litre in 2018. Such a high concentration of fluoride can lead to several health problems, particularly oral health issues such as dental fluorosis. While it causes discolouration in the initial stages, severe fluorosis can lead to permanent physical damage to teeth. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderAccording to a report, doctors practising in these areas have asserted that the fluoride concentration in water has led to a noticeable rise in cases of oral health problems, particularly among children and young adults. Impure drinking water and presence of a large number of minerals in the groundwater reserves seem to be a major concern in districts of South Haryana. The worse impact of this is being felt in the Mewat region where a large number of cancer cases is being reported due to consumption of contaminated water. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsThis issue was recently raised in the budget session of Haryana Vidhan Sabha. Speaking on the issue, Haryana Chief Minister ML Khattar advocated the formation of the committee of Southern Haryana districts led by Gurugram and Faridabad to deal with the challenge. Medical experts highlight over 30 per cent of the diarrhoea cases in the city were due to consumption of contaminated food and water. Worryingly, there was a large number of minors and infants who were affected by the disease. The seriousness of the situation came to the fore when more than 20 patients from Om Vihar suffering from diarrhoea registered themselves for treatment in the Civil hospital in 2018, on a single day. A 20-year-old died due to the disease. There have been cases in the past where water samples collected by public agencies in posh areas of the city have contained a huge amount of toxic minerals.last_img read more

56 lakh housing units worth 451 lakh cr delayed in 7 cities

56 lakh housing units worth 451 lakh cr delayed in 7 cities

first_imgNew Delhi: Around 5.6 lakh housing units, worth Rs 4.5 lakh crore in seven major cities are running behind the delivery timelines mainly due to demand slowdown and fund diversion by developers, according to property consultant Anarock. These 5.6 lakh flats were launched before 2013 in these seven cities — National Capital Region (NCR), Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), Chennai, Kolkata, Bengaluru, Hyderabad and Pune. “The top 7 cities currently have a total stock of 5.6 lakh delayed housing units worth a whopping Rs 4,51,750 crore,” Anarock founder and chairman Anuj Puri said. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscal”Lakhs of buyers across top cities particularly MMR and NCR – have been left in limbo, leading to inconceivable mental stress and financial pain,” he added. As per the Anarock data, the NCR and MMR account for 72 per cent of the total stuck housing units. In MMR, as many as 1,92,100 apartments worth Rs 2,17,550 crore are delayed, while the NCR has 2,10,200 units worth Rs 1,31,460 crore running behind the schedule. The main southern cities of Bengaluru, Chennai and Hyderabad together account for a mere 10 per cent of the overall stuck housing units of a total worth of Rs 41,770 crore. The Southern cities have predominantly been driven by service-class end-users, leaving limited scope for developers to be unprofessional. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boost”It has become a ‘chicken and egg’ situation – buyers have understandably stopped releasing funds to builders, and builders claim they have no funds to complete construction,” he added. Every delayed project results in cost overruns which compound the funding crunch even further. Anarock chairman said the lack of project clearances for whatever reason also contributes to the piling up of housing stock. In the pre-RERA era, many builders launched greenfield projects without the requisite approvals in place, resulting in their projects getting stuck. The consultant said that by amending the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code and treating buyers at par with banks and other creditors, the government has safeguarded the interests of affected buyers. “Whichever government is in power after the upcoming general elections, it has a mammoth task to complete. Delayed projects have severely weakened faith in under-construction properties and reviving buyers’ trust is a herculean task,” Puri said. If buyers stop purchasing under-construction properties, builders would have a far more challenging time to get funds from external sources for project construction, he added.last_img read more