Tag: 上海水磨会所

MessageMe test on Oct. 7

MessageMe test on Oct. 7

first_imgOn Thursday (Oct. 7) the Harvard MessageMe emergency notification system will be tested. All MessageMe registered subscribers will receive a test message between noon and 1 p.m. The test message will be delivered as a text message, email, and/or voice mail message depending upon the delivery method selected by each subscriber.  No action will be required as a result of this test. Any and all emergency test messages can and should be deleted.For more information, to sign-up up for service or update your information, visit the MessageMe website.last_img read more

UGA Hay Site.

UGA Hay Site.

first_imgSidney Law didn’t intend to become such a popularguy. But once farmers learned Law could lead them to hay at easy prices, his phone startedringing off the hook.Soon Law, a Washington County agent with the University ofGeorgia Extension Service, had to find a betterway to get the word out. Now his office maintains a World Wide Web site to direct drought-plagued Georgia farmers to the hay they need.”Some local cattlemen were telling me, ‘We’ve been feeding hay all summer,'”Law said. “I just felt sorry for them. They’ve had a rough summer. So I startedlooking for hay sources.”Hot, dry weather from late spring through most of the summer parched Georgia pasturesand other grazing. Georgia farmers normally cut and store hay during the summer to feedlivestock during the winter. But the summer drought has left them facing a seriousshortage of hay.Law found some hay in Kentucky, including some free hay. The agriculture departmentthere worked with Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Tommy Irvin to get the word out. And a newsrelease from Irvin’s agency connected the words “free hay” with Law’sSandersville, Ga., office.”‘Free’ wasn’t quite right,” Law said. “Some Kentucky farmers had somefree hay. But you had to transport it down here. All of the hay had a cost in one way oranother.”The cost was often low, though. And Law’s phone was constantly busy.”The demand for hay information was overwhelming,” said Bill Lambert, assistant dean for extension with the UGACollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”The Internet site is an attempt to ease the burden of calls and improve the flow ofinformation.”The Web site lists the names, addresses and phone numbers of hay sources. It gives thetype of bale and the kind of hay, too, along with the amount available and price. It alsoprovides information on forage fields, pasture for rent and transportation available.Lambert has instructed county agents in all Georgia counties both to direct farmers tothe Web site and to provide hay information to Law’s office to keep the site up-to-date.”We will also be working closely with the Georgia Farm Bureau and other agencies to make this as complete aninformation site as possible,” Lambert said.Farm Bureau will publish a hay directory in October. The sources in it will be listedon the UGA Web site. The directory will be available in all county Farm Bureau andExtension Service offices, too.Locally, Lambert said, county Extension Service agents may work with farmers,businesses and agencies on hay deals. Law, for instance, worked with other WashingtonCounty farm groups to bring two tractor-trailer loads of reduced-price Kentucky hay to 20livestock farmers. Two local trucking companies did the hauling free as a backhaul.”The information flow is beginning to work well,” Law said. “We’rehoping to eventually hear from a lot more sources, especially from those closer by. Somefarmers even in Georgia were able to make hay this summer. The need for hay is strong. Wejust need to help connect that demand with the supply.”last_img read more

For the Love of Trails

For the Love of Trails

first_imgMeet Todd Branham: Race Director for Blue Ridge Adventures, contributor to Trail Solutions, and Pisgah National Forest legend with a deep love for the trails he shreds.Branham has made a life for himself surrounding what he loves most – mountain biking. He’s been racing for over 30 years and is recognized for curating and delivering world-renowned races to the tallest and most rugged mountains this side of the Mississippi since 1998. Though he’s known for many accomplishments in the mountain bike community, he’s best known for the Pisgah Stage Race.“This race is regarded as the best and highest quality enduro stage race in the world with consistent, gnarly singletrack on the docket every single day. The five-day, fully supported endurance event features 140 miles and 20,000 feet of elevation gain,”says Julie Bacon, Digital Marketing Manager for Blue Ridge Adventures through Darby Communications and avid mountain biker.“The event also feature farm-to-table meals, music and on-site accommodations that create a sort of “village” while the 200 racers are in town.”The success in his races is no accident. Branham is a devoted and hardworking professional trail builder, creating and restoring trails all around the world.“He is dedicated to the trails he loves so much and is known as a resource in the trail building community,” says Bacon.We asked Branham some questions about his journey with mountain biking.Todd Branham hiking a trail. Photo courtesy of Land of Sky Media..Where did it all begin? Where and Why did you build your first trail?It started when I realized that doing volunteer trail work in the Forest was the ONLY way at the time to DIRECTLY impact the Forest your operating in. I started working with trained officials of the Forest and became a trail crew leader in Pisgah National Forest. A few years later I received a call from a long time friend that had a professional trail building company ( Long Cane Trails ) and needed some extra hands. I worked in S.C. a bit on trails and eventually bought 50% of the company. 20 years later we have built over 300 miles of new trail and refurbished many more miles of trail. We have built in 3 countries and in all types of terrain. What are some of the most memorable moments of the Pisgah Stage Race?Watching people’s minds constantly being blown at the level of our event and how awesome the Pisgah Forest really is. I get this satisfaction every year as Pisgah still has not been discovered by some. I know it’s world class, it’s always cool to show others that. Why have you devoted your life to mountain biking?Simple, follow what you love What were the highlights of your racing career?Winning the 2009 East Coast unification race was a bonus on being the 2009 National Series Cross Country and Enduro Champion in my age category for the US. This victory was surreal. Partnering with my good friend Wes Dickson at the famed BC Bike Race to get 4th was pretty spectacular also. Now days I enjoy mixing it up with the top racers across the world on my bike at stage races. It’s such a great way to explore new places!center_img Branham is living proof that following what you love is by far the best way to spend your time. You not only bring happiness and satisfaction in your own life, but your excitement for what you do resonates in others and inevitably produces your best work. His passion has made Branham an icon in the mountain biking community and an inspiration to us outdoor lovers. What got you to create Blue Ridge Adventure and the Pisgah Stage Race?Blue Ridge Adventures was formed due to the passion to find my placement in the world around Cycling. I realized I wasn’t quite good enough to be a pro rider, so promoting events seemed very interesting too. I got my hands dirty with promoting cycling events at the bike shop I worked at in college. At the time no one was operating any cycling events in the Pisgah National Forest. I started 21 years ago with a dream to share Pisgah with folks, this wonderful place that in the cycling world had yet to discover. Today, elite athletes sworn here and the world’s eyes focus the terrain of these old mountains in WNC.Pisgah Stage Race was born to celebrate our area that is one of very few in the US that can actually pull of such an event. With so many trails in our area that connects to one another, Pisgah is very unique. Top that off with being able to connect town to the forest and magic happens! This simply doesn’t exist but in a few towns in the US- trails linking from your town DIRECTLY to the US Forest Service trails. Racing all over the world myself has shown me what a special place I live in. I wanted to share this with the world.last_img read more

BPD on the watch for bus arm violations

BPD on the watch for bus arm violations

first_imgBatesville, IN—The Batesville Police Department is working with the Batesville School Corporation in following up with drivers who disregard school buses with the arm signal device extended. The violation is covered in Indiana Code 9-21-12-1 and is a Class A infraction but can be a Class A misdemeanor under Indiana Code 9-21-8-52.Vehicles traveling from either direction must stop for a school bus with the arm signal extended when there is no physical barrier or median.The Batesville Police Department and Batesville School Corporation want to ensure children are safe when on or near the roadway. If you witness a violation, call 911 if you can safely do so. If you call 911, dispatch will ask if you were able to obtain the following: the license plate number, vehicle description, driver description, and location. Any information you are safely able to obtain is helpful.last_img read more

Irish fighters get through to next round in Olympic qualifiers

Irish fighters get through to next round in Olympic qualifiers

first_imgKatie Taylor, Brendan Irvine and David Oliver Joyce all won their fights to reach the semi-finals.But there was disappointment yesterday for team captain Darren O’Neill, who was edged out on a split decision by an opponent from Azerbaijan.Earlier in the evening, Ceire Smith and Christina Desmond also lost their quarter finals.last_img

Bringing a taste of Africa to London

Bringing a taste of Africa to London

first_imgRay Maota Beverly and Dereck Joubert are wildlifedocumentarians who are passionate aboutthe conservation of big cats in the wild. Legadema, the leopard, is the star ofthe Jouberts’ documentary “Throughthe eyes of a Leopard”.(Images: Beverly and Dereck Joubert)MEDIA CONTACTS• National Geographic London Store+44 207 025 6960The African bush and all its beauty have been brought to central London in the form of a two-month photographic exhibition, Visions of Africa, made by award-winning wildlife filmmaking and conservationist couple Beverly and Dereck Joubert.The exhibition opened at the National Geographic store on Regent Street on 5 July 2011 and will run until 5 September.The launch of the exhibition coincided with the introduction of two new National Geographic DVDs by the Jouberts, Big Cat Odyssey and Lions of Darkness.Big Cat Odyssey documents the Joubert’s 30 years of filming big cats and Lions of Darkness looks at the challenges facing a growing pride of lions.Another DVD, Ultimate Enemies, will be released on 14 August 2011. It’s a compilation of three films made by the couple: Ultimate Enemies, a film about a pack of lions which have learnt how to hunt elephants; Eternal Enemies, about the territorial battles between hyenas and lions; and Relentless Enemies, which documents how lions hunt indomitable buffalo.Dereck said: “When we went out into the wilds of Africa we needed to understand the ecosystem by looking at the top predators. There cannot be a more ‘top predator’ than the lion, as they give you a good idea of how everything else works.”Beverly added: “We try to create awareness of how quickly we are losing these cats – we could lose them in 15 years. We do not want to be chastising nations or cultures, but we cannot be shooting lions when the animals are in decline.”For their efforts over the years the couple have won numerous accolades, among them five Emmys and the World Ecology Award.The recent launch included an auction of Beverly’s photographs of Legadema, a female leopard the Jouberts have followed since she was eight days old.Legadema is Setswana for “the light from the sky”.Through Legadema’s eyesThe Jouberts have also made a documentary of Legadema’s life, entitled Through the eyes of a Leopard.As a cub left alone while her mother was on hunts, Legadema quickly learned to survive the perils of the wild.The young cat practised her hunting skills on squirrels and made her first kill at five months when her mother brought her a live impala.Legadema and her mother became separated after an incident when the young cub interfered with her mother’s hunt, leaving the hyenas to capture the prey.The growing Legadema soon became independent and one day managed to kill a baboon, which was carrying its young. In an intriguing twist, the leopard temporarily adopted the orphaned ape and nursed it through the night, picking up the tiny animal every time it fell from the tree.Although Legadema protected the young baboon from other predators, it didn’t survive the night, as it was too weak to live without its mother.This encounter with the baby baboon was documented by the Jouberts and published online, earning Legadema instant internet fame.The Jouberts are now planning to document the next chapter of Legadema’s life as a mother of two cubs.King of the jungle nearing extinctionAccording to Beverly, large numbers of big cats have been wiped out over the last 50 years, making their conservation a top priority.The couple are helping preserve animal habitats and migration routes through their tourism business, Great Plains Conservation.Dereck said: “The way we go about life is to be part of the planet. Most people are divorced from the planet and we are trying to mend the relationship for all of us.”Having worked in Botswana for many years, Beverly commended the country’s policy on protecting its wilderness.The couple have also partnered with National Geographic to establish the Big Cats Initiative to find ways of protecting big cats in the wild.“We no longer have the luxury of time when it comes to big cats, if there was ever a time to take action, it is now,” said Dereck.last_img read more

A small state with big farmland preservation efforts

A small state with big farmland preservation efforts

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Leisa Boley Hellwarth, a dairy farmer and an attorney near CelinaCare to guess where the most expensive farmland in the country is located? Hint — it’s the smallest state in the union at 48 miles long and 37 miles wide: Rhode Island.Any guesses as to which state has the most beginning farmers? Hint — the second most densely populated. More than a million call this tiny state home: Rhode Island.Can you guess which state has lost the most farmland? Hint—the state has lost 80% of its farmland since 1940: Rhode Island.According to the 2014 Census of Agriculture, Rhode Island had 1,243 farms on 69,589 acres and 71% of these farms are 10 acres or less. And 30.8% of the farmers are new.It’s worth looking at Rhode Island’s current support of agriculture. In the midst of trade wars, tariffs, low commodity prices, and farmer suicides, Rhode Island is encouraging the local food movement where restaurants, grocers, caterers and consumers purchase directly from local farms. Many attribute this movement as the explanation for Rhode Island leading the nation in beginning farmers. Some of these new operations are owned by individuals that did not grow up on a farm or have any prior connection to the land. What they did have, however, was the ability to locate a market niche and the drive to develop a farming operation that provides food to that market.Many of the new operations are on rented land. The state of Rhode Island recently created the Farm Acquisition Program to enable these operations on rented ground to purchase land. The state will purchase land at the appraised value, then sell the land to the farmer for its agricultural value, approximately 20% of its market value. Since Rhode Island is so small, the development pressure on land is huge. The state retains the development rights to make sure that the land remains farmland.Rhode Island wants those entrepreneurs, those spirited people who build an agricultural business, to stay in Rhode Island and not have to leave to find cheaper land in some other state. Rhode Island strives to produce half of its own food by 2060. That is a noble goal, as Rhode Island currently produces about 1% of its own food.Rhode Island created a new program that addressed one of the concerns facing its farmers, the inability to purchase farmland due to the booming real estate market. As one farmer explains, “What I see as enough land to grow food for 130 families, a developer would see as enough land to build eight McMansions.”Rhode Island did the math. The farms create jobs and income. The McMansions merely consume. In 2015, agriculture accounted for 2,563 jobs in the state and contributed $239 million to the economy. Both figures increased 40% from 2012.Rhode Island took the initiative, created a program, and funded it. The Farm Acquisition Program received $3 million as part of the Clean Water, Open Space and Healthy Communities bond issues approved by RI voters in 2014.The Farm Acquisition Program is not Rhode Island’s first effort to address their farmers’ needs. They already have an existing farmland preservation program that purchases development rights in exchange for development restrictions. Also, Rhode Island leases two large properties they own — Snake Den Farm in Johnston and Urban Edge Farm in Cranston — to farmers at below-market rates.Instead of rhetoric or pleas for federal intervention, Rhode Island crafted programs that address the needs of their farmers. I can only hope other states follow their lead.Rhode Island’s innovative support of their farmers is true to their independent streak. It was the only state to reject ratification of the 18th Amendment banning the manufacture and sale of alcohol in 1920. Rhode Island was also the first of the original 13 colonies to renounce allegiance to Great Britain in 1776 and was the last to ratify the Constitution in 1790, insisting that the Bill of Rights be added.Nice job, Ocean State!last_img read more

Ben & Jerry’s: How a Big Brand Explores Augmented Reality

Ben & Jerry’s: How a Big Brand Explores Augmented Reality

first_imgchris cameron Tags:#Augmented Reality#NYT#web 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Related Posts Right now, Ben & Jerry’s fans can download the company’s official iPhone app and use what it calls “Moo Vision” to unlock 3D AR experiences launched by the carton lid designs. With one of four flavors of ice cream, users can view different virtual dioramas that display scenes from small family farms where ingredients originate. By unlocking all four, users can access special Ben & Jerry’s iPhone background images – a small token that encourages participation.Looking Back on the Process Ben & Jerry’s worked with its PR firm, Edelman, and “imaginative tech” development shop Circ.us, which used metaio’s Unifeye Mobile SDK to roll out natural feature tracking on the iPhone. O’Brien says the company had a very positive overall experience working AR into its campaign – a process that only took two months from start to finish, with many changes and revisions along the way.One lessons she and the company took away from the process was to remain flexible when implementing AR or any emerging technology. The project began as a print campaign, that eventually moved to the Web and then to mobile. The AR shifted from marker-based to natural feature tracking, all making for a frantic last couple of months, she said. It was certainly worth it, as Ben & Jerry’s is now the first major brand to sport natural feature tracking on the iPhone. So much for pointing people to scoop shop locations. 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App As we have mentioned previously, the success of augmented reality depends partly on its exposure through major mainstream brands. Late last week, the Ben & Jerry’s ice cream empire took its first steps into the world of AR by adding the functionality to its iPhone app – but not in the way you might immediately assume. Today, I had the opportunity to chat with Katie O’Brien from Ben & Jerry’s about the app and how a large brand approaches unique and niche emerging technologies.Usually when a large brand experiments with mobile AR, they immediately think to provide the heads-up navigator that helps people find store locations. We saw this earlier this year when the popular sandwich chain Quiznos partnered with Layar to provide this exact functionality, but the company peppered in a bit of its own brand of fun as well.The AR Decision Ben & Jerry’s, a brand with hundreds of shops around the world, could have easily followed a similar path, but instead it has taken things a bit further. Katie O’Brien, manager of Ben & Jerry’s global digital marketing initiatives, says the company first became excited about AR when it was “blown away” by General Electric’s Smart Grid Web-based AR campaign. “Wow, one day we should do something like that,” O’Brien remembered thinking.Earlier this year, that day came. Ben & Jerry’s began planning for a campaign that highlighted the fact that many of its ingredients come from small family farms. The campaign, named “It’s what’s inside that counts,” was to feature rich visualizations and was the perfect opportunity for the company to finally jump into AR, O’Brien says.New Tech, New OpportunitiesTaking what it had seen from GE, the company originally began planning for a Web-based experience, but shifted to mobile when it learned that iOS 4.0 would allow for natural feature tracking within AR apps. The company originally struggled with the idea of how to get a special AR marker onto its existing ice cream carton designs, but the shift to mobile natural feature tracking (which could have also been accomplished on the desktop) eliminated the need for these markers. 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

20 CANADIAN ALBUMS THAT TURNED 20 THIS YEAR

20 CANADIAN ALBUMS THAT TURNED 20 THIS YEAR

first_img Login/Register With: Chapter I: A New Beginning, The MoffattsMay 18, 1998While the ’90s boy band phenomenon overwhelmingly focused on American acts like *NSYNC and Backstreet Boys, it was a trend that found success in other parts of the world like Korea (which would later birth the K-pop movement), the U.K. and Canada. Arguably, Canada’s most successful ’90s pop boy band was the Moffatts, a group made up of brothers Scott, Dave, Bob and Clint Moffatt. In the mid ‘90s, the Moffatts had established themselves as a country group, even moving to Nashville briefly and performing regularly on Ralph Emery’s talk show, Nashville Now. But the group made a significant shift in 1998 with its third album, Chapter I: A New Beginning. Trading in country tunes for pop-rock melodies, the Moffatts realigned their sound to match what was happening on the charts south of the border and became a huge hit.The album was certified platinum in Canada, was picked up and released in the U.S. the following year and garnered two Juno nominations. (The Moffatts hosted the Junos in 2000 and scored two more nominations in 2001.) The music certainly fit a specific boy band mould — heart-on-the-sleeve, fairly straightforward love songs — but the Moffatts were one of the few groups who opted for playing live instruments over flashy choreography. And on top of that, their ability to write a catchy hook was evident all over the album, with hits like “Misery,” “Girl of My Dreams,” and “Crazy.” Even with the emergence of B4-4, SoulDecision and 3Deep, a large portion of Canada’s late-‘90s boy band legacy belongs to the Moffatts, and it’s something pop lovers can absolutely take pride in.— Melody Lau Twitter Advertisement Breath from Another, EstheroApril 28, 1998Walkerton, Ontario native Esthero (real name Jenny-Bea Englishman) and her debut album are some of Canadian music’s best-kept secrets. While perhaps not a household name, you’ve likely heard Esthero’s work somewhere since this 1998 debut — whether through her 2005 album Wikked Lil’ Grrrls (which featured the likes of Sean Lennon, André 3000 and Cee-Lo Green), her work on the viral “Yes we Can” Obama campaign song, or as a writer/vocalist on Kanye West’s 808s & Heartbreak. But, for ’90s-loving Canadians Who Know, Esthero’s greatest work remains this tragically underrated trip-hop masterpiece, which was recorded entirely with her then production partner Doc McKinney, who’s gone on to become The Weeknd’s executive producer.While Portishead and Björk’s moody lounge grooves thrived globally in the mid-to-late ’90s, Esthero’s album of a similar sonic essence failed to win over the mainstream outside its vibe-laden first single “That Girl.” While the singer has since savoured the chart love her first album didn’t get, you can’t help but wonder what magic might have happened had she stayed in this hypnotically soulful lane, which has made a considerable comeback 20 years later. — JH Tamia, TamiaApril 14, 1998If you didn’t realize R&B gem Tamia was Canadian, it might be cause to re-evaluate your patriotism. The Windsor native soared to international stardom right off the bat, after being scouted by music manager Brenda Richie (Lionel Richie’s ex-wife) and signed to Quincy Jones’ label Qwest Records less than a year into her career. She appeared on such songs as the Grammy-nominated collaboration “Missing You” with Brandy, Chaka Khan and Gladys Knight, which was one of three Jones-produced, Grammy-nominated collaborations she sang on in 1997.In 1998, she released this self-titled debut to mixed reviews, despite its renowned R&B classic “So Into You” (not to be confused with Fabolous’ equally delightful 2003 reincarnation), a “Careless Whisper” cover and “Imagination,” which features Jermaine Dupri and a Jackson 5 sample. While Tamia didn’t win the Juno in either category she was nominated in this year, she (and a few other formidable songstresses in this list) signified a brave new era of Canadian R&B.— Jess Huddleston LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Inner Urge, Dave Young Trio feat. Gary BurtonMay 4, 1998On the heels of his acclaimed three-volume Two by Two series for Justin Time Records, bassist Dave Young upped the personnel (but not by much!) for 1998’s Inner Urge, a superb outing for his trio with guitarist Reg Schwager and drummer Michel Lambert. Vibraphone legend Gary Burton joins them on three tracks: first, a propulsive reading of Joe Henderson’s title track, then Duke Ellington’s “It Don’t Mean a Thing,” taken at a languid tempo, and finally Cedar Walton’s “Bolivia” on which Schwager lays down an especially accomplished solo. The remaining six tunes are a mix of Young originals and jazz classics, including Thad Jones’ “Three in One,” a great vehicle for a drummer of Lambert’s clarity. Other highlights include Young’s arco playing — warm, perfectly in tune — on “Psalm for E.M.,” the trio’s impressive cohesiveness on “Sir William,” and the breezy original, “Irie,” that closes the album in optimistic D major.— Robert Rowat Facebook When you think of 1998, you might remember the baggy fashion trends, your new favourite show Dawson’s Creek or the inception of a little-known search engine called Google.Here at CBC Music, 1998 brings to mind a number of classic, and not-so-classic (albeit memorable), Canadian albums that skipped in our Discmans — providing the soundtrack to the last few carefree years before Y2K.20 years later, revisit the retro Canadian sounds with us below — in chronological order — and let us know what we missed over on Twitter. How I Feel, Terri ClarkMay 19, 1998Clark’s third album, How I Feel cemented her country music star status in the U.S.A. thanks to the success of the record’s second single, “You’re Easy on the Eyes.” The track, a funny song that flips the script on the typical male gaze narrative, reached No. 1 on the country charts in both the U.S. and Canada. Clark puts her male subject on notice, and she’s the one objectifying and quantifying his cost/benefit analysis, as “easy on the eyes and hard on the heart.” The best zinger? “So why don’t you send me your photograph?/ It would hurt a lot less than taking you back/ then I could still have my favourite part of you.”Gender-flipping songs like this became something of a Clark trademark. It’s evident throughout How I Feel, and it’s something Clark reflected on in a recent interview with CBC Music. “Although a lot of my songs are female-empowering, I’m attracted to a lot of songs a guy would do or you could hear a guy doing, the tougher sort of edge that they have,” she said. Diving back into How I Feel with this framework puts a decidedly feminist lens on Clark’s subversive twist of the classic country sound.— Andrea Warnerlast_img read more

CUPE calls off Flair Airlines job action citing job security concerns

CUPE calls off Flair Airlines job action citing job security concerns

first_imgThe Canadian Press BURNABY, B.C. — The Canadian Union of Public Employees has called off a job action by 139 Flair Airlines flight attendants that was set to begin at midnight tonight.The union cites concerns for the job security of members of CUPE Local 4060 for its decision. It says in a release that Flair Airlines issued memos to employees advising that anyone taking part in the job action would not be scheduled for further work.It also says the company offered an additional $150 pay per day to anyone crossing the picket line to get to work.The union says it’s going to challenge Flair’s move at the Canada Industrial Relations Board before proceeding with any job action.Contract negotiations have been ongoing for more than a year, and CUPE issued the strike notice after mediated talks on Wednesday failed to resolve outstanding issues involving wages, pensions, time credits and scheduling.Flair Airlines flies out of Vancouver, Abbotsford, Kelowna, Calgary, Edmonton and Toronto.last_img read more