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Crystal Palace BOOST! Key man declared fit to face Manchester United

Crystal Palace BOOST! Key man declared fit to face Manchester United

first_img James McArthur in action for Crystal Palace 1 Crystal Palace midfielder James McArthur has been passed fit to return for the trip to Manchester United on Wednesday.The Scot has been sidelined since the start of February with an ankle injury but has recovered in time to be in contention for Palace’s FA Cup semi-final against Watford at the weekend and is set to be given a run out against Louis van Gaal’s team.With Sunday’s trip to Wembley in mind, manager Alan Pardew is set to ring the changes for the visit to Old Trafford after revealing that Joel Ward, Scott Dann and Joe Ledley will all be rested.“McArthur’s back for the Man United game, which is really good news,” said Pardew.“Yala’s [Yannick Bolasie] struggling a little, [Joel] Ward will miss tomorrow’s game.“Scott Dann and Joe Ledley have knocks. They’ll make Sunday, not Man United.”Pardew also confirmed he is not willing to discuss any new contract with chairman Steve Parish before the club’s Premier League status is secured.“Until we’re mathematically safe we won’t do anything on contracts,” he said.last_img read more

Doctors Deny Darwin

Doctors Deny Darwin

first_imgDoctors and medical professionals may comprise the largest block of scientists with qualms about evolution.  According to a Finkelstein poll, an average of 60% of doctors, depending on religious demographics, reject the completely unguided Darwinian evolutionary explanation for life.  A new organization, Physicians and Surgeons for Scientific Integrity (PSSI), has begun a website Doctors Doubting Darwin where medical professionals are invited to sign the following statement:As medical doctors we are skeptical of the claims for the ability of random mutation and natural selection to account for the origination and complexity of life and we therefore dissent from Darwinian macroevolution as a viable theory.  This does not imply the endorsement of any alternative theory.Evolution News had a report on these developments.    Another doctor raised a strong voice against the fruits of social Darwinism.  Dr. C. Ben Mitchell, writing for Baptist Press, sternly denounced the National Institutes of Health for giving a school $773,000 to “develop guidelines for the use of human subjects in what could be the next frontier in medical technology – genetic enhancement.”  Mitchell says that to all familiar with the horrors of eugenics that led to the Nazi holocaust, and who joined in the chorus “never again,” this is a dangerous development.  After reminding his readers how the original atrocities began with the most benign intentions, he warns, “This grant does not merely cross a moral line in the sand, it uses your tax dollars and mine to demolish a brick wall 10-feet wide, turning it to rubble.  We must protest the use of our tax dollars for genetic enhancement research of any kind.”How soon we forget.  We must not!  Less than two months ago, Professor Ernst-Ludwig Winnacker, President of Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), lamented the willing cooperation of doctors and scientists in the Nazi regime:I must admit that it strikes me as bitter and disturbing that we … at the DFG can find barely a trace of resistance, no outcry against the exclusion of Jewish scientists and their expulsion from universities, not a murmur against the abuse of agriculture and humanities for the criminal purpose of displacement of nations in Eastern Europe, no questioning of the execution or the purpose of medical experiments.  Rather, the radicalisation of science in the service of the Nazi regime was evidently sanctioned without query.The ability of educated and otherwise rational people to quickly descend into hideous depths of human depravity for the sake of an ideology was shockingly illustrated in a sobering article by John Kekes in City Journal.  He retold the story of Robespierre, dictator during the Terror of the French Revolution, who rationalized unbelievable acts of human violence, cruelty and debauchery in the name of reason and liberty.  Kekes draws parallels with later ideologues of the Communist era, and today’s terrorists, to warn us that we must never assume such things could never happen again.  This article is a must read.  (The contrast with the American Revolution is most instructive.)    With radical Darwinists pushing the new eugenics on the one side, and radical Muslims pushing terrorism on the other, this is no time for appeasement or apathy.  Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty – and of life.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

What’s Wrong With Our New Furnace?

What’s Wrong With Our New Furnace?

first_imgSaving Energy With Manual J and Manual DHow to Perform a Heat-Loss Calculation — Part 1How to Performa a Heat-Loss Calculation — Part 2All About Furnaces and Duct SystemsResidential CommissioningOut With The Old, In With The NewWhen Do I Need to Perform a Load Calculation?We Are the 99% — AND the 1%How to Use Climate Consultant 4 That process, he writes, should begin with Manual J and Manual D calculations to make sure the furnace is matched to the heating loads in the house, and that the ductwork is designed correctly. Following installation, the system should be commissioned to make sure it operates as intended.“There is a good chance that your contractor never performed steps one, two, or three, unfortunately,” Holladay says. “You should start by asking your contractor about these three steps. You may need to hire a home performance contractor to check your system if (as I suspect) your contractor doesn’t understand the three steps I listed.”Melichar suspects that Holladay has a point.“I wouldn’t be surprised if your suspicions about our contractor not completing those steps are right,” he says. “My conversation with the furnace installer hired by our contractor was limited to, ‘How big should it be? 60K BTU? 66K BTU?’ He said ’60.’ We were responsible for shopping for it. The contractor made a suggestion of a single-stage, single-speed blower system even though we stated we wanted the opposite, so I’m not sure how familiar they are with improved technologies.” RELATED ARTICLES Did the installer do his homework?GBA senior editor Martin Holladay’s first question is whether the heating contractor has taken all the necessary steps to ensure the furnace was specified and installed properly. Your new furnace is just plain too bigTo Dana Dorsett, the problem is more fundamental: The furnace is way too big for Melichar’s house.A typical house of that size framed with 2x4s, and one with clear glass double-pane windows or storm windows installed over single-pane windows, should show a heating load of 22,000 to 28,000 Btu/hour with an outdoor temperature of 0°F and the thermostat set at 68°F, Dorsett says. In a house with 2×6 framed walls insulated to R-20, the heating load would likely drop to between 19,000 and 24,000 Btu/hour, he adds.“So, is a 60,000 Btu/hr two-stage the optimal furnace for your house?” he asks. “I seriously doubt it.”“Odds are pretty good that even at it’s lowest firing rate the output is probably more than 3x oversized for your actual 99% heat load,” Dorsett continues. “A reasonably tight and insulated 2×4 house at 30°F would have a heat load of maybe 15,000 Btu/hr, 20,000 Btu/hr if it’s all single-panes with no storms — and even an uninsulated brick house would typically come in well under 40,000 But/hr.”If Melichar has access to records for fuel use, he can check the heating load at the actual outside design temperature (as established by ACCA’s Manual J Residential Load Calculation) based on heating degree-day data.In an exchange with Alan B, Dorsett’s defends the process by which he estimates Melichar’s heating loads, adding the new Goodman furnace could be as much as 10 times too big for the 500-square-foot zone, and as much as six times too big for the 1,000-square-foot part of the house, even when it’s burning on low.Even in cases where heat-load calculations have been performed, a variety of factors can throw them off, Dorsett says, including assumptions about R-values, air infiltration, and the effects of plug loads.“Seems there is not sufficient enforcement of California Title 24, which [if I remember correctly] requires Manual J heating and cooling load calculations even on replacement equipment, and may even require duct leakage testing and remediation (though that might only be for new construction),” Dorsett says. Here are some tweaks you can makeJon R suggests that the specifications for the furnace Melichar has installed don’t show much of a difference between high and low stage. But, he adds, there is an adjustment for air flow that would reduce the “high winds” the system seems to be producing now.“Also make sure that the thermostat supports two stages,” he adds. “Adjust zone dampers so that they never close to less than two-thirds.”“That’s interesting about the dampers not being closed more than two-thirds,” Melichar replies. “It makes sense to me and seems a route to consider given that we are expecting the furnace to sometimes heat the whole 1,500 square feet, most often the 1050-square-foot upstairs and sometimes only the 500-square-foot downstairs.“As you probably suspect, when the furnace is only heating the lower 500-square-foot zone, it is loud and fast!” he continues. “Reducing that cfm by leaving the upstairs damper upstairs makes sense.”Reid Baldwin adds that a zone controller, a device installed between the thermostats and the furnace, may be to blame.“Even if you have two-stage thermostats and a two-stage furnace, the zone controller may only be capable of single-stage logic,” Baldwin says. “When you use a single-stage controller with a two-stage furnace, the furnace is usually programmed to run on low stage for about 12 minutes and then to switch to high stage until the heat call ends. The furnace has no idea how many zones it is feeding. If you have a two-stage zone controller, it would have more sophisticated logic, like using low stage when only one zone is calling for heat and high stage when both are.” Another heating optionIf Melichar were to start over, Dorsett thinks a better approach, given the heating loads, would be to produce hot water with a condensing tank-style water heater and distribute the heat via a one-ton hydronic coil air handler, such as the Firstco 4CW.The Firstco is capable of delivering 13,700 Btu/hour with 120°F water and a pumping rate of 2 gallons per minute, and 19,200 Btu/hour with 140°F water.“That would deliver long comfortable low-cfm flow cycles,” Dorsett says. “The max flow on the Firstco 4CW is 400 cfm, which is lower than the lowest heating cfm setting on the Goodman GMVC960603BN (600 cfm, set to minus 10%.)“If air conditioning is a ‘must have,’” he adds, “doing the heating and cooling with minisplits might make more sense. But cooling loads are low enough on that side of the bay that most houses that size do just fine with a half-ton window-shaker for cooling.” John Melichar has upgraded the furnace in his two-level San Francisco home, one of several improvements that should have made the house more comfortable as well as more energy-efficient. The new furnace has the capacity recommended by his heating contractor, but so far the house seems less comfortable, not more comfortable.In a post at GBA’s Q&A forum, Melichar explains his concerns:“Our contractor told us to buy a 60K Btu/h furnace; we opted for 96% AFUE with two-stage variable blower — the Goodman GMVC960603BN.“We get high winds from the vents,” Melichar continues. “We thought that the variable blower and two stages meant that the unit would operate on a low flame and low fan (cubic feet per minute) level but that doesn’t seem to be the case. The furnace starts out slow then ramps up to gale storm.”These problems prompt Melichar to ask whether the furnace has been installed incorrectly. Maybe the contractor has recommended a furnace that’s too big for the house. Can some adjustments be made to improve its performance?Further complicating Melichar’s situation is a language barrier with the contractors who installed the furnace: He’s able to speak with only one of them.That’s the backdrop for this Q&A Spotlight. Our expert’s opinionGBA technical director Peter Yost added these thoughts:I am going to build on Dana Dorsett’s comments on choosing another heating option. I think the series of images below from the free download software Climate Consultant is worth 1,000 words on what I feel is the completely misguided type of space conditioning system that was elected for this project. (For more information on Climate Consultant, see “How to Use Climate Consultant 4.”)To follow along, simply download Climate Consultant 6, enter the California zip code for John Melichar (94132) and use the drop-down list of charts. And note that the Climate Consultant starting page summary states, “Climate Consultant seeks to translate outdoor conditions into indoor comfort…”California Climate Zone 3 has about six months of low-grade space heating and then six months with just about zero active space conditioning need. As Dana explains and Climate Consultant 6 reinforces, it’s hard for forced-air systems to be as effective as an integrated package of other design and mechanical strategies.I think the oversizing and misapplication of the type of system means John should go after the HVAC contractor for such gross errors and then move, if he can, to a hydronic system (or hydro-air system) that allows him easily and effectively to combine his space heating and domestic hot water loads.last_img read more

In the Twilight zone: H.M. Naqvi on Karachi

In the Twilight zone: H.M. Naqvi on Karachi

first_imgH.M. NaqviMany cities are founded by gods, heroes, conquerors but Karachi emerges from nothing, from stories. There are stories about Ram and Sita sojourning in a verdant cove that would become a canton of the city. There are stories about a wandering Sufi who settled by a creek and in,H.M. NaqviMany cities are founded by gods, heroes, conquerors but Karachi emerges from nothing, from stories. There are stories about Ram and Sita sojourning in a verdant cove that would become a canton of the city. There are stories about a wandering Sufi who settled by a creek and in time the lice he shook from his head metamorphosed into crocodiles. There are stories about some natural calamity, an earthquake perhaps, that compelled the inhabitants of nearby bastis to populate the scrim of coast on the Arabian Sea that is now populated by some 18.2 million souls officially (21 million unofficially).Karachi is vast and varied. It might rain in Orangi but it remains sunny in Pipri. There might be street battles in Lyari while families picnic on the seaside at Sandspit. There are Balochi neighbourhoods such as Razaqabad where women are holed up in dull, concrete, single-storied structures, and cantons that include McNeil Road where Christian matrons wander on the streets in skirts. Any attempt then to distill the city into discourse is fraught, if not always futile. One might begin with one’s own story, one’s own Karachi.****My grandfather arrived in the city not long after the sudden, sundering inception of India and Pakistan. He would wind up in a onebedroom, ground-floor portion of a semi-detached house in Paposh Nagar that featured low ceilings, flimsy doors, paved concrete floors, and despite the sehen in the back, could feel somewhat claustrophobic. The household comprised some 15 members then, many of whom sprawled on charpoys under the sky at night because it would be warm inside.advertisementPeople celebrate Pakistan Independence day in Karachi in 2011.Recently, I visited Paposh Nagar after an eon. When I arrived, the curious neighbourhood children, tossing a wizened tennis ball, inquired after me, and when I told them my grandfather lived here, they informed the landlord’s wife of my visit. “My husband’s at the shop,” she said, hand on hip- the same shop his father ran half a century ago.We used to look up to the landlord, literally and figuratively: He lived above us, he owned real estate, ran a business. Whereas there were times when my grandfather would not be able to feed his eight children and would have to dispatch them to his in-laws. My slight, unschooled, sariclad, Purbi-speaking grandmother, however, made certain that her children were educated, that they worked hard, that they excelled. Consequently, in the span of a generation, almost all her children moved from one part of town to the other. They would become doctors, engineers, chartered accountants, bankers and one joined the foreign service. Although my grandfather died in a rented house, his sons would, in time, purchase land, build homes, make a life for themselves.****The story of Karachi is a story of immigration. After all, save the crocodiles at Mungho Pir, there was nothing to Karachi 300 years ago. But when scattered communities of fishermen congregated in and around Karachi, the Baloch rulers of Sind took note. By the 18th century, the latter tried to capture the emergent trading post thrice. Karachiwallahs only relented in 1795 on the condition that the Baloch would not enter town. As a result, the conquering force set up camp along the Lyari River-the second wave of immigrants to the city. In 1800, Karachiwallahs threw out the small British contingent that had set up a factory within the town limits. The denizens of Karachi have always been hardy and fiercely independent.The third wave of immigrants came after 1831, after the bloody battle at Miani where British forces slaughtered 10,000 locals to secure Sind. They were Parsi, Goan, Lohana, Bohra. Last month, I met with the Bohra Lanewallah clan, one of the oldest extant families of Karachi. They owned vast swaths of real estate once, including the spectacular Sayfi Apartments, home to many of the city’s Jews. At one juncture, the Lanewallahs were among the most prosperous families in the city. Things, however, have since changed: The Jews have packed up and the Sayfi Apartments have frayed. The dynamic of immigration is straightforward: Each wave displaces the last. And each community grates against the other, then coexists.Unlike Lahore or Islamabad, Karachi is not pretty. It’s a rough and tumble megalopolis like Sao Paulo, like Mumbai, that features a hardy, dynamic populace.There are periods when other immigrant communities are at daggers drawn-Mohajir, Pathan, Balochi, Sindhi-followed by periods of relative amity. In the last decade, Karachi mostly flourished. Trash was collected. Parks sprang up. Roads, water lines were laid. Above all, law and order was maintained. In 2001, for instance, the homicide per capita rate in the city was lower than Boston, than Seattle. Things changed circa 2008. The detritus from the war on the border flowed downstream. Turf wars became routine. This summer, Lyari, a troubled canton ruled by feuding mafias (much like Dongri), went up in flames. The day I began writing this piece, 12 died in what newspapers term “targeted killings”.Lyari, however, is also renowned for its soccer players, snooker players, boxers and beer halls. Since I enjoy beer, I had tried visiting several times but each time I attempted I was told “it’s not such a good time”. During the soccer World Cup, however, Pax Lyrariana was declared. Massive screens were set up (reportedly 26 altogether), courtesy of the reigning don, Uzair Balouch. Thousands spilled on to the streets, some swilling beer, all championing Spain. (When I asked a Makrani boy raising a large yellow flag, Why Spain, given the expulsion of Muslims, the inquisition, he thoughtfully replied, Yes, but they still have Muslim blood in them!)advertisementAt halftime, I was summoned by Uzair. I expected a large, fearsome character. Instead, I found myself face to face with a handsome, soft-spoken fellow about my age, sporting a Brazil jersey. “You’ve come from outside,” he said. “Tell them to give us money for our stadiums, for the youth.”A stone’s throw from Lyari is Lee Market, an animate commercial mecca of the city, offering everything from tea and tinned products to nuts and dry goods. In offices the size of closets, Memons, Punjabis and Pathans conduct trade worth millions of rupees daily. And they will tell you that Uzair’s men run a massive extortion racket. One powdered milk merchant informed me, “Once upon a time the MQM collected bhatta. But they left it. Maybe they have other things to do.”****There are other stories, other dynamics that inform Karachi but routinely escape discourse. Once I visited Qazafi Town, a far-flung canton populated by Waziris, Pathans who hail from the troubled badlands of the country bordering Afghanistan. Had I walked into a home in Waziristan (especially being a Shia), I might have been deemed wajib-e-qatl, or “liable to be killed”, but in Qazafi Town I was invited into a co-ed home-school by two young women.Their mother, a tough matriarch, sat surveying her domain on a charpoy, while their brother, a bearded character with his shalwar above his ankles, was on his way to the mosque around the corner- rumoured to be patronised by the sectarian terrorist outfit, Sipah-e-Sahaba. How, I wondered, did he allow the school to function?I learned that after his father’s death, he became responsible for three women. Consequently, when approached by a local start-up NGO, he made an economic decision, not a religious one: By allowing the home-school, his sisters would receive a salary, free medical treatment (via a monthly mobile health clinic) and the school-his house-received floor mats, a water cooler. In a few years, he changed the way he lived and thought, the way his people lived and thought for centuries.advertisementFLAME, the organisation funding the homeschool (and hundreds around the country), is characteristic of the private social initiatives that define the life of the city. A student leader Adeeb Rizvi, built SIUT, a free, world-class kidney hospital from scratch. A group of businessmen that include Jameel Yusuf founded the Citizens Police Liaison Committee, an institution cited by the UN as a model for crime prevention. Humanitarians such as Akhter Hamid Khan, a pioneer in microfinance and “bottom up community development”, and Abdul Sattar Edhi-founder of a social welfare programme that operates the largest ambulance service in the world, not to mention orphanages, clinics and women’s shelters-have been Nobel contenders. Where the state fails, Karachiwallahs pick up the slack.****Unlike Lahore or Islamabad, Karachi is not pretty. It’s a rough and tumble megalopolis like Sao Paulo, like Mumbai, that features a hardy, dynamic populace. Karachiwallahs make Karachi Karachi. The city is populated by thugs and humanitarians, businessmen and novelists. No other city in Pakistan (or say, Austria for that matter) could sustain something like the Karachi Literature Festival. No other city can boast weekly qawwalis and mushairas as well as art exhibitions and plays. Karachi has changed dramatically in three centuries and will continue changing at the same pace. Whether it will change for the better or worse is a matter best left to punters and political pundits. I need qawwali, a plate of nihari and the energy of a megalopolis.Like my grandfather, I might not own any real estate in the city (or, for the record, anywhere else), but I have carved a life for myself here. As a storyteller, Karachi fascinates. There’s a story under every stone.-The writer is an award-winning author of Home Boy. He lives in Karachi. His next novel, to be out in 2013, is set in the city.last_img read more