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Watch Flea Funk Out With The Rebirth Brass Band After RHCP Show

Watch Flea Funk Out With The Rebirth Brass Band After RHCP Show

first_imgLast night was legendary, as the Red Hot Chili Peppers hosted members of both Trombone Shorty and Rebirth Brass Brand, as well as Ivan Neville and George Porter Jr. in an incredible performance at Smoothie King Center in New Orleans. The local legends have all played with RHCP before, but the coming together of all parties was truly unbelievable.After the show, Flea popped over to the Maple Leaf Bar for an after-show with Rebirth Brass Band. The Chili Pepper bassist even sat in for a RBB original, “The Dilemma” from the band’s 2011 Grammy award winning album Rebirth of New Orleans. It’s moments like these that make the city of New Orleans so amazing.Watch Flea perform “The Dilemma” With Rebirth Brass Band, courtesy of Stu Howlin Wolf:last_img read more

Widespread Panic Continues Their Panic En La Playa On Night Two [Videos]

Widespread Panic Continues Their Panic En La Playa On Night Two [Videos]

first_imgWidespread Panic played their second of four performances for their sixth annual Panic En La Playa in Riviera Maya, Mexico. The Mardi Gras theme night on the beach brought the southern rock icons to the main stage for another beautiful evening with their fans for two sets as the moon rose high.The first set opened with a “Love Tractor,” quickly engaging in a “Holden Oversoul.” The Space Wrangler tune led into a “Tall Boy” > “Little Lily” > “All Time Low” extended jam to mark the middle of the set with a “1×1” shakedown. The first set closed with “Waiting On The Bus” into a cover of ZZ Top‘s “Jesus Just Left Chicago,” a likely, yet celebrated, pair.“Waiting On The Bus, Jesus Just Left Chicago,” courtesy of LoadOffAnnie:The second set saw “Christmas Katie” turn the corner into a “Let It Rock” > “Rock” before bringing it back for “Time Zones.” The jams continued strong with a “Worry” > “One Kind Favor” > “Fishwater” > Drums into Dr. John‘s “I Walk On Guilded Splinters” and back into “Fishwater” to close the night.“One Kind Favor,” courtesy of MrTopdogger:The band returned for “Pilgrims” and “Black Out Blues” to close the night.Check out the full setlist below, courtesy of PanicStream. You can also head to PanicStream for a full audio stream of the performance. Widespread Panic returns to the stage tonight, March 1.Setlist: Widespread Panic | Panic en la Playa | Riviera Maya, MX | 2/28/17Set I: Love Tractor, Holden Oversoul, Tall Boy > Little Lily > All Time Low, 1 x 1, Thought Chorizo, Waiting For The Bus > Jesus Just Left ChicagoSet II: Tail Dragger, Dyin’ Man, Christmas Katie > Let It Rock > Rock, Time Zones, Worry > One Kind Favor > Fishwater > Drums > I Walk On Guilded Splinters > FishwaterE: Pilgrims, Blackout Blues[Photo via WSP FB]last_img read more

Harvard voted league favorite

Harvard voted league favorite

first_imgPRINCETON, N.J. – Harvard was voted as the league favorite in the Ivy League preseason media poll, released today (Aug. 10) as part of the league’s annual football media day.Harvard received 10 of the 17 first-place votes and finished with 128 points. Penn received six first-place votes and 124 points while Brown was third in the voting with 95 points. Yale also received a first-place vote in rounding out the upper division selections in fourth place with 83 points. Those four teams were picked in the same order for the second straight season.Ten Harvard players were named preseason All-Ivy League by Phil Steele’s Football Preview, while captain and free safety Collin Zych has garnered preseason All-America honors from every publication.For the full story.last_img read more

Expanding the brain

Expanding the brain

first_imgIt’s among the cornerstones of biology: All mammals inherit two copies ― one from their mother, the other from their father — of every gene, in part to act as a backstop against genetic problems. If a gene is damaged or malfunctions, its double can pick up the slack.When it comes to inheritance, however, not all genes are created equal.Led by Catherine Dulac, the Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, a team of researchers has identified more than 40 new “imprinted” genes, in which either the maternal or paternal copy of a gene is expressed while the other is silenced. The findings, described in a recent paper in eLife, reveal how genomic imprinting can dramatically expand biological diversity, and could have important implications for understanding the brain.“We looked at a single brain area — the cerebellum — in a very rigorous way, and found 115 imprinted genes, more than 40 of which were brand-new,” Dulac said. “That is a 30 percent increase in the number of known imprinted genes in the mouse, which is significant, but the other important idea this paper explores is the notion that these imprinted genes provide a way for the diversity of the brain to flourish. In addition to the diversity in our genetic sequence, the question of who are we inheriting these genes from adds to the diversity we see across a population.”The notion of genomic imprinting emerged in the late 1980s, when researchers began manipulating mouse embryos in the moments after fertilization. When sperm and egg fuse to form a zygote, Dulac explained, each temporarily forms a separate pronucleus — one carrying genetic information from the mother, the other from the father. These later fuse to become the nucleus of the embryo.When researchers began manipulating the pronuclei by replacing the paternal version with a second maternal copy, or implanting two paternal copies, embryos failed to develop.“That was very surprising,” Dulac said. “At the time, it was believed that you simply needed two copies of each gene, but this suggested that some genes are expressed only from one of the two parental genomes, and you need both to give rise to a full-blown organism.”After first focusing on the cerebellum, Dulac’s team expanded its analysis to the entire brain.“In the second part of the paper, we looked at how these imprinted genes are distributed across the brain, and between brain and non-brain tissue. The big surprise is that we found a very large subset of imprinted genes that are only imprinted in the brain, and some only in a subset of brain regions.”The surprise came in part because scientists have long believed that if a gene is imprinted in one tissue, it is likely imprinted through most of the organism’s tissues, including through the brain.“But we don’t think that’s the case,” Dulac said. “We think there’s some very interesting regulation of imprinting from the brain to non-brain tissue, and even from one brain region to another.”While genomic imprinting is often thought to silence one copy of a gene, the study showed that many imprinted genes aren’t completely silenced, but rather show a bias toward one copy.“So there may be 70 percent expression from the maternal allele, and 30 percent from the paternal,” Dulac said. “It’s not all on or all off.”To understand whether these biases have biological significance, Dulac and colleagues targeted a gene called Bcl-X, which, in the adult cerebellum, is expressed 60 percent from the paternal genome and 40 percent from the maternal, and helps prevent cell death.“Our question is, ‘Does the brain care about that bias?’” Dulac said. “If it doesn’t we could remove either copy of the gene, and it shouldn’t matter. But if that bias ― even though it’s not particularly strong — is important, when we remove the more highly expressed copy of the gene, we should see a different phenotype emerge.“When we did this, the results were spectacular. When we removed the paternal copy, we obtained mice with brains that were 15 to 20 percent smaller than mice in which we removed the maternal copy or mice which had both copies.”Importantly, Dulac said, tests showed that, in the cortex, inhibitory neurons were more affected by the change.Many researchers believe that the ratio between excitatory and inhibitory neurons plays a key role in brain development, Dulac said, and that an imbalance between the two types could be related to a number of disorders, including autism and schizophrenia.last_img read more

Students petition for light

Students petition for light

first_imgAfter senior Monica O’Hearn was hit by a car Wednesday night at the intersection of Twyckenham Road and Vaness Street, her roommate, senior Karen Allen, started a personal petition on behalf of O’Heam to install a stoplight. The petition has gathered more than half of the 300 signatures Allen set goal for. She plans to submit the signatures to the University when she reaches her goal O’Hearn said she thinks the accident could have been prevented if there were a stoplight there.             “I was biking to my apartment and had stopped at the crosswalk,” O’Hearn said. “The road has two lanes in each direction, and a car in the far lane had honked his horn for me to pass. I hadn’t noticed as I started to pedal that there was a car in the near lane, and when the driver and I realized what was about to happen, I pedaled faster and he hit the brakes, but the car still hit my bike.             “I was thrown off the road, but thankfully, my injuries are minor and I walked away with only bruises and cuts on my legs and sides.”             O’Hearn said she believes a stoplight at the intersection would remove these communication issues between drivers and pedestrians.             “If there were a stoplight, it would provide an opportunity for pedestrians and bikers like myself to cross safely, as well as clear doubt in drivers’ minds about whether stopping was necessary,” she said.             Senior Mary Jeanne Brenholts, one of the 163 signers of the petition, said the current situation at the intersection is not safe for pedestrians. The intersection, near the student housing at Irish Row and Clover Ridge, currently has a crosswalk light that alerts oncoming cars when people are crossing.             “When you’re crossing the street, you push a button and the yellow flashing lights come on,” Brenholts said. “Sometimes the lights are on and the drivers still don’t slow down, so every time you cross the street you’re not sure whether they’ll slow down this time or not.”             Brenholts said the problem is partially because drivers are unfamiliar with the meaning of the yellow lights.             “The lights come on right away when you push the buttons because the pedestrians do have the right of way, but drivers don’t always slow down for us,” she said.             Kevin Condit said he signed the petition because he thinks the area is at a “high risk” for pedestrian-automobile accidents, and he has seen too many close calls.             “I ride my bike through that intersection every day, so I’m familiar with it, and I see people go pretty fast through there,” Condit said. “I think a stop sign would be a good addition because it’s a high-traffic intersection.”             Both Brenholts and Condit said that they became aware of the petition through Facebook, and signed because of their personal connection to the area.             “I live off-campus in Clover Ridge, and I bike to campus because I don’t have a car,” Brenholts said. “Sometimes, it just doesn’t feel safe, and I know [O’Hearn’s accident] is the kind of thing that could have happened to anyone.”             Condit said he thinks that installing a stoplight is the best way to make students feel safer when passing through the area.             “The importance of this cause is definitely highlighted by the fact that someone got hit there,” Condit said. “Sometimes, it unfortunately takes an accident like that to show you just how important it is.”             O’Hearn said Allen contacted the Department of University Affairs in student government to see what can be done within the university, and the two are hoping to get the city of South Bend involved as well.             “We are looking into possibilities in South Bend, and hoping to use the petition as an indicator of student concerns.”             Students interested in accessing the petition can find it at http://www.change.org/petitions/university-of-notre-dame-put-a-stoplight-at-the-crosswalk-at-vaness-and-twyckenham.last_img read more

Church leaders deliver lectures on preferential option for the poor

Church leaders deliver lectures on preferential option for the poor

first_imgCatholic leaders Cardinal Charles Maung Bo and Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez urged the Church for a greater devotion to the poor in the Center for Social Concerns’ 2019 Catholic Social Tradition conference, titled “Engaging Social Tradition: Option for the Poor.”The seminar, which took place from Thursday to Saturday, hosted a number of presentations, lectures and panels on the topic of the preferential option for the poor — a modern principle of Catholic theology based on advocacy for the marginalized.In a lecture Friday evening in McKenna Hall, Bo, the first-ever cardinal of Myanmar, called for the Church to remember the needs of the poor in Myanmar and similar impoverished countries.Catholicism was first brought to the country by Jesuit missionaries in the ’50s, he said. In 1962, however, a coup d’etat ushered in an era of martial law that would last nearly half a century. During this time, non-Buddhist minority groups, including the Catholic Church, endured intense persecution from the state.“In 1962, we lost everything, and [the] myopic socialist regime expelled the missionaries,” he said. “All our resources were challenged.”Catholicism in Myanmar nevertheless continued to grow, increasing from around 300,000 in the ’60s to about 700,000 today. Still, Bo said, the Church there is struggling. Despite being rich with natural resources, 75 percent of Myanmar lives below the poverty line; hunger, disease and violence run rampant, with ethnic minorities being the most vulnerable.“As we walk through Lent, I often feel the life of the people of Myanmar is the way of the Cross,” Bo said. Though they have much to offer, Bo said he feels wealthy nations have turned their backs on Myanmar’s poor.“Pope Francis called this a ‘globalization of indifference,’” he said. “The problem today is not ‘fake news,’ but the fragmented discourses about human suffering — [a] total hijacking of the discourse of the poor men’s and women’s tears and brokenness is the sad reality of this era.”Bo said the heavy hand of Myanmar’s corrupt government and a lack of humanitarian aid from abroad has crippled the country.“Brothers and sisters, poverty is not natural as rain or snow. Poverty is a manmade disaster,” he said. “People are made poor, kept poor — poverty is the modern sin of the modern times.”Though theological scholars have written about the preferential option for the poor since ’70s, Bo said the poor demand the doctrine’s teachings be implemented.“For every man of faith, option of the poor is not an option but a mandate from Jesus himself,” he said. “The poor are always with us, as Jesus said. We have no alternative. We are poor, powerless and align ourselves with the most powerless and those thrown out of their society.”Gutierrez, who helped found liberation theology — a modern Christian doctrine which upholds social, economic and political freedom for the oppressed — delivered a lecture in McKenna Hall on Saturday. Speaking via translator, Gutierrez called for the Church to make charity the bedrock of its faith.“Salvation is understood sometimes as trying to save oneself. And then our option for the poor — you know, almsgiving and helping people in need — is understood as a way to save [oneself],” he said. “We need to think about being christians as something way more than that.” The Church must also acknowledge poverty extends beyond monetary privation, he said.“We need to go beyond the understanding of poverty that thinks about it in terms of lack of economic means, lack of money,” Gutierrez said. “It’s way more than that. It’s about despising people, it’s about racism, it’s about just despising those who are not like [us]. Overall, when we think about the poor we need to understand it in terms of those who are seen as not being human.”Echoing Bo, Gutierrez said poverty has, in part, global inaction to blame.“Poverty was [once] considered to be an unfortunate situation and given,” he said. “We need to continue asking the greater question about this fixed position and the idea that poverty is not a given situation but a caused situation.”Intrinsic to the option of the poor is the understanding that God is close to those who help the suffering, Gutierrez said.“This is the heart of the Bible. This is the Bible,” he said. “Of course, there are many nuances we should add, there are many ways to resemble the closeness that God has for the poor and hungry, but the key point is that this is the core of the Bible.”Tags: Catholic Social Teaching, Center for Social Concerns, liberation theology, Myanmar, poverty, Preferential Option for the Poor, Religious Discriminationlast_img read more

The Brazilian Army Concludes the Production of Loris Night-Vision Goggles

The Brazilian Army Concludes the Production of Loris Night-Vision Goggles

first_imgBy Dialogo July 15, 2011 A marvelous production by the Brazilian Army. Let’s support it by spreading the word. The Rio de Janeiro Military Arsenal, a manufacturing unit of the Brazilian Army, has concluded the production of Loris night-vision goggles (NVG). The order will be supplied to Brazilian troops for use on peace missions abroad and in Brazil itself, as in the case of the city of Rio de Janeiro. Night-vision goggles use image-optimization technology that functions by gathering minuscule amounts of residual light, imperceptible to the human eye, and amplifying them in order to send them through the image intensifier tube, in such a way that it is possible to see the image while in a quite dark environment. All the parts and accessories for the goggles were imported and received by the Rio Military Arsenal in completely disassembled form, for the process known as CKD (complete knock-down). The goggles are powered by a 1.5-volt alkaline battery and are capable of 1x magnification, with a focus range from twenty-five centimeters to infinity, without the possibility of getting closer. The goggles have an eyepiece diopter adjustment range from -6 to +2, making it possible to correct for the visual deficiency of the goggles’ user. They are appropriate for nighttime urban combat and enable troops to operate safely on narrow streets and paths lacking streetlights, among other scenarios for use. last_img read more

Risk, risk everywhere and not a stop to think

Risk, risk everywhere and not a stop to think

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Sometimes I get a headache when I think about risk. Why? It’s EVERYWHERE! When I get up in the morning there is a risk I’ll trip over my cat and fall down the stairs. Because I have no warning labels on the cup of coffee I make at home like I get when I go to McDonald’s, there is a risk I’ll burn my tongue. There is a risk I might even wear brown shoes with black pants if a light bulb burns out! It’s overwhelming!So, it’s no surprise that we might feel that same level of angst when we think about compliance risk at our credit union. As in life, compliance risk is everywhere! How can you even stop to think about where it is, whether it can be mitigated and whether you are willing to accept certain residual risks?I used to think the answer to everything was to find that one perfect risk assessment spreadsheet or tool that I could use to identify, log, monitor and measure every compliance risk every imagined. It became my Holy Grail. I searched everywhere, but never found exactly the thing that I was looking for.As my frustration grew, I began to realize that this was because you can’t put all risk into the same bucket. The way you identify, evaluate, and monitor risk can be very different depending upon the area you are looking at. An ACH risk assessment may look very different than an information security risk assessment. Your BSA risk assessment will probably be very distinct from a Red Flags risk assessment. continue reading »last_img read more

Ex-PPF chief Rubenstein to lead DB consolidator ‘superfund’

Ex-PPF chief Rubenstein to lead DB consolidator ‘superfund’

first_imgIn a statement, The Pension SuperFund said it expected to grow to £20bn “and beyond” over time.Alan Rubenstein, who left PPF at the start of this year after early nine years in charge, is to lead the consolidator fund as CEO. He told IPE there was an estimated £250bn market for the fund’s services today, and that this would probably double over the next five years as schemes continued to close to future accrual.“In that context £20bn seems well achievable,” he said.Rubenstein is joined at the superfund by Marc Hommel, the former global head of pensions advisory at PwC, and Luke Webster, chief investment officer at the Greater London Authority and former chief financial risk officer at the London Pension Fund Authority. Webster is also partner and chief financial officer at Disruptive Capital.Rubenstein said The Pension SuperFund was already in discussions with several pension funds, sponsors and advisers. As to when it would absorb a first scheme, he told IPE that time would tell.”These things clearly do take time,” he said. “We’ll have to wait and see, but we have been really cheered by the reception that we’ve received so it does look like we have good wind behind us.” Alan RubensteinBlazing a trailThe launch of the consolidating fund is a direct response to challenges from both the UK government and the pensions industry to find ways to ensure the sustainability of DB schemes and many of their sponsors by improving governance and efficiency.Last year, a taskforce set up by the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association (PLSA) advocated “superfunds” as an alternative funding option for DB schemes with weak sponsors.In a wide-ranging white paper published on Monday, the UK government supported the PLSA’s work and promised to consult on changes to legislation to allow commercial consolidators to operate.“Some employers find that they are constrained from focusing effectively on their core business because of the need to support a closed legacy pension scheme, the liabilities of which may be volatile and unpredictable,” the government said. The first commercial consolidator of UK defined benefit (DB) occupational pension schemes has launched, with the former chief executive of the Pension Protection Fund (PPF) at its helm. The Pension SuperFund has been set up to absorb bulk transfers of UK DB pension assets and liabilities and consolidate them into one occupational pension scheme.It has lined up £500m (€571m) of capital to underpin these commitments and establish the vehicle, largely coming from private equity firms Warburg Pincus and Disruptive Capital as initial investors. Investors will share in any surplus achieved by the superfund after benefits are paid.The latter is the family office of Edi Truell, a long-term supporter of scheme consolidation through previous roles as co-founder of Pension Insurance Corporation and chair of the London Pension Fund Authority.   What the government says on consolidationcenter_img “If an employer can afford entry they could exchange their covenant support through transfer to a consolidator and know exactly how much they had to pay, making planning for their future business easier. If at the same time members’ benefits were likely to be more secure, then this would create a more beneficial situation for all parties.”The white paper indicated the consultation on a legislative framework and authorisation regime was likely to take place towards the end of this year.However, Rubenstein said the superfund saw no reason to wait until the consultation took place and legislation was passed. ”We want to make a start now because we think there is a real demand for it and a real need,” he said.He said The Pension SuperFund welcomed the encouragement given to consolidation in the government’s white paper and that it was right that The Pensions Regulator (TPR) made sure there was sufficient protection for members. Rubenstein has a long history of working closely with the regulator during his tenure at the PPF.“We would hope to work with them and help in defining those rules, but we believe that fundamentally it is possible to do consolidation under the existing framework,” he said.The superfund would seek approval – known as “voluntary clearance” – from TPR every time it absorbed a scheme, according to Rubenstein. No benefit changes A scheme’s transfer to the superfund would not trigger changes to benefits, according to Rubenstein. He said that The Pensions SuperFund did not think it necessary to have legislation to simplify or standardise benefits. This was in contrast to the PLSA’s findings.“We think it is possible to offer all existing scheme members the same benefits as they’re currently getting but to deliver those with greater certainty,” he said. “We don’t need to do actuarial equivalence, we don’t need to do bulk reductions.”In the statement announcing its launch, The Pension SuperFund said the scale provided by consolidation would enable it to achieve higher investment returns, stronger risk management and lower costs.“This, underpinned by the capital provided by its investors, will enable The Pension SuperFund to offer higher levels of security for meeting future pension promises and better outcomes for pension scheme members, trustees and sponsoring employers,” it said.Rubenstein declined to comment further on the criteria the consolidator fund would use when assessing schemes for transferral, beyond that they had been decided and would relate to size, covenant “before and after”, and funding levels. The keenly anticipated government report was published on MondayOffering industry the opportunity to innovate and create a number of different models with a variety of target markets could, in future, offer a more affordable way of risk transfer. However, it is important that this is done in a safe way, with clear parameters for vehicles to operate within and to provide members with reassurance that funds are meeting a set of clearly defined standards.Despite the work already done within the industry on commercial consolidation vehicles, there is much more to do to develop this policy to a point where it could be successfully delivered. When the current DB legislative framework was designed, it was always intended that an employer would stand behind the scheme, or that the scheme would buy out with an insurance company subject to strict funding and capital requirements.We therefore need to ensure that exchanging sponsor covenant and moving into a commercial consolidator improves the expected outcomes for members in order to realise the benefits that consolidation could bring.We are therefore developing proposals for a legislative framework and authorisation regime to enable consolidation in which an employer no longer sponsors their DB pension scheme.There is a delicate balance to be struck. If the legislative framework is too restrictive, then the consolidator vehicles may not be commercially viable but if the vehicle is under-protective of members, then the risks to members’ benefits will be unacceptable. We have therefore identified a number of areas that will need to be considered, which will be subject to further consultation this year.last_img read more

OKEA takes interest in Equinor’s Aurora discovery

OKEA takes interest in Equinor’s Aurora discovery

first_imgOKEA estimates that the recoverable volumes are in the range of 12-28 mmboe. OKEA aims to become the operator for the licences and pursue a low-cost development of Aurora as a tie-in to the Gjøa platform without further appraisal drilling. The acquisition of interests in licences PL195 and PL195 B is effective as of 1 January 2020, OKEA said on Wednesday. Both the transaction and a potential change in operatorship are subject to approval by the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. PL195 and PL195 B licences map; Source: OKEA OKEA has signed a sales and purchase agreement with Equinor for the acquisition of Equinor’s 40 per cent operated working interest in two licences offshore Norway, which include the Aurora discovery. center_img Aurora is a small gas discovery in the North Sea located west of the Gjøa field. Erik Haugane, CEO of OKEA, said: “By this transaction, we are diversifying our portfolio as well as strengthening our position in the Gjøa area. Wintershall DEA and Petoro each hold respectively 25 per cent and 35 per cent working interest each in the licences. “A development of Aurora fits right into the core of OKEA’s strategy with low-cost field development of smaller discoveries”.last_img read more