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Skerik, Charlie Hunter, And More To Transform Pop Hits Into Jazz As Omaha Diner

Skerik, Charlie Hunter, And More To Transform Pop Hits Into Jazz As Omaha Diner

first_img“If the song didn’t make it to number #1 on the Billboard pop charts, we don’t play it. That’s a guarantee,” is Omaha Diner’s motto. The unique concept sees the band taking pop hits and recreating them as funky jazz numbers. The supergroup is quite literally the sum of its parts, consisting of Skerik (saxophone), Charlie Hunter (guitar), Bobby Previte (drums), and Steven Bernstein (trumpet). While this is a crew of serious musicians, they also know how to have a damn good time when the opportunity to play together presents itself.Natalie Cressman Announces Album Release Party In NYC With Omaha DinerThe group has decided to get together for the first time since 2014, and will play New York City’s American Beauty on Saturday, March 24th, alongside the Natalie Cressman Band, who will be celebrating the Trey Anastasio Band trombone player’s latest solo effort, The Traces EP (purchase tickets here). We had a chance to ask the ever-enigmatic Skerik a couple of questions, and as always, his answers were most amusing.L4LM: How would you explain the amalgamation of sheer talent that is Omaha Diner?Skerik: The search for the principles governing the universe and help advance the evolution of humanity in accordance with them… finding ways of doing more with less to the end that all people everywhere can have more and more music”….(Buckminster Fuller quote)L4LM: It’s Omaha Diner’s first shows in a couple of years. Was there an urge to get back together and play some shows, or was it more of a timing issue with everyone’s schedules?Skerik: “There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it’s going to be a butterfly.” (another Buckminster Fuller quote) We could not foresee our own future, so we booked a gig. Thankfully Natalie Cressman’s band is playing as well…L4LM: How did the band’s decision to play only #1 pop hits from the Billboard charts come to pass?Skerik: “I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I’m frightened of the old ones.” (John Cage quote) We wanted to frighten John Cage, so the band was born.If those answers are any indication, this show is going to bring the weird, as Omaha Diner recreates their own version of songs from artists such as Bruno Mars, Adele, Beyoncé, and many more. The band also has a record that is available on vinyl and digital, which can be purchased at omahadiner.com.Tickets for the Omaha Diner  / Natalie Cressman show at American Beauty in NYC on March 24th are currently on sale and can be purchased here. For additional updates and show updates, check out the Facebook Event page.last_img read more

Brian Wilson To Perform The Beach Boys’ Christmas Album In Its Entirety For 2018 Holiday Tour

Brian Wilson To Perform The Beach Boys’ Christmas Album In Its Entirety For 2018 Holiday Tour

first_imgThis week, Brian Wilson, co-founding singer, songwriter, and widely-renowned recording wizard of The Beach Boys announced a run of special Holiday-themed dates late this year. The tour will also feature special guests Al Jardine and Blondie Chaplin, Wilson’s longtime bandmates with The Beach Boys.The tour, set to begin on November 28th in Minneapolis, will mark the first time that Wilson and his solo band have performed The Beach Boys’ Christmas Album (1964) in its entirety. The shows will also include cuts from Wilson’s solo Christmas album, 2005’s What I Really Want For Christmas and other cheerful holiday numbers. According to the tour announcement press release, fans can expect to hear Beach Boy classics “Little Saint Nick”, “The Man with all The Toys”, and a selection of Brian’s favorite Yuletide songs including “Blue Christmas” and “Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town”.Wilson is coming off a wildly successful tour celebrating the 50th anniversary of The Beach Boys’ landmark 1966 album, Pet Sounds, which kept him on the road for the majority of 2016 and 2017 after repeated tour extensions due to popular demand.For information on pre-sale codes for each Brian Wilson Holiday Tour performance, VIP packages, and more, head to Brian Wilson’s website here. See below for a full list of Wilson’s Holiday Tour dates.Brian Wilson Holiday Tour Dates:November 28, 2018Minneapolis, MNOrpheum TheatreNovember 30, 2018Hammond, INHorseshoe CasinoDecember 1, 2018Northfield, OHHard Rock in Northfield ParkDecember 4, 2018Englewood, NJBergen Performing Arts CenterDecember 7, 2018Staten Island, NYSt. George TheatreDecember 11, 2018Sarasota, FLVan Wezel Performing Arts HallDecember 12, 2018Hollywood, FLSeminole Hard Rock Hotel & CasinoDecember 15, 2018Austin, TXACL Live at The Moody TheaterDecember 16, 2018Midland, TXWagner Noel PACDecember 17, 2018San Antonio, TXTobin Center for the Performing ArtsDecember 20, 2018Thousand Oaks, CAThousand Oaks Civic Arts PlazaDecember 22, 2018Santa Rosa, CALuther Burbank Center for the ArtsDecember 23, 2018Reno, NVGrand Sierra Resort & CasinoView All Tour Dates[H/T Pollstar]last_img read more

Europe’s crisis of conscience

Europe’s crisis of conscience

first_imgIt took a searing image of a 3-year-old Syrian boy who had drowned and washed ashore on a Turkish beach to put a human face on what analysts and human rights activists have been calling a humanitarian crisis for years.The flood of refugees seeking asylum in Europe is not new. Over the last decade or so, millions driven from their homelands by ongoing conflicts in Afghanistan and Somalia, for example, have found respite in European nations, with varying success.But the myriad challenges posed by the massive wave of new migrants fleeing war-torn countries like Syria and Eritrea and seeking asylum in Turkey, Greece, Hungary, and Germany, among others, has prompted widespread disagreement and confusion among European nations over how best to manage the unfolding tragedy and how the nations’ actions will shape Europe’s future identity.Scholars discussed the historical antecedents and contemporary challenges this mass migration of refugees poses for the European Union during a panel held Wednesday as part of a two-day summit on the future of Europe hosted by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies.Already, there are 4 million documented Syrian refugees who have fled Syria in overcrowded boats or made the treacherous journey over land to escape the brutal civil war between the regime of Bashar Al-Assad and the jihadi terrorist group ISIS, as well as other splinter groups. About 2.1 million refugees are now in Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, and Lebanon, with around 1.9 million registered in Turkey.Although it’s believed that far more people are undocumented refugees, border security estimates that about 500,000 people, more than half of them under age 18, have been displaced since January. At least 2,500 people have died trying to reach the West.The photo of young Aylan Kurdi “was a wake-up call for everybody; it suddenly galvanized a sort of moral outrage which had been lurking for some time,” said Jacqueline Bhabha, FXB Center director of research, professor of the practice of health and human rights at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Jeremiah Smith Jr. Lecturer at Harvard Law School.Despite the recent recognition by many EU leaders that something must be done, Europe is still “very divided” over how to effectively manage the crisis. Case in point, Bhabha said, is the broad disagreement over which nations are welcoming refugees and which should welcome them, and how many they’ll assist.Courtesy of Jacqueline Bhabha“The enormity in the disparity in responsibility and humanitarian engagement is, I think, really staggering,” Bhabha said.The idea that Europe needs protection or “fortifying against dangerous outsiders” has led to damaging policies aimed at refugees, including long and harsh detentions, children improperly housed with adults, and limited access to legal representation, she said.“These are policies which are completely at odds with the principles on which Europe was founded after World War II,” said Bhabha.Also, the chaotic and disjointed response to the refugees has offered political cover for those who seek to fuel rising anti-immigrant hostility in Europe.“Clearly, the ripple effects on the increased popularity of far-right parties in Europe are just going to be absolutely horrible,” said Michèle Lamont, director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies and professor of sociology at Harvard.“What is ongoing now in Europe is a collision of three different crises all at once, and to move forward you must deal with all three,” said Jytte Klausen, Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Cooperation at Brandeis University.Brandeis professor Jytte Klausen (left) and Michèle Lamont, director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, speak inside the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerFirst, there is the immediate humanitarian crisis to grapple with — registering new arrivals, determining their precise status and needs. It’s a tough task made even more difficult by the sheer size of the influx and the reality that no one truly has a firm grasp on the precise numbers of refugees, where they’re coming from, or even why. Further, while the flow of humanitarian aid has been “extraordinary,” it’s still “insufficient” to deal with the volume of people arriving daily, said Klausen.Second, there’s a strategic crisis, in large part because there is no strategic doctrine to deal with global mass terrorism or other national security failures that cause this kind of global migration; no legal framework to capture, detain, or prosecute the 10,000-plus Westerners who are joining terrorist groups such as ISIS; and no process to coordinate a response within Europe so that nations aren’t duplicating efforts or letting aspects fall through the cracks, she said.“Meanwhile, everybody is sitting back and waiting for the United States” to take the lead, leaving a “vacuum” caused fueled by “a lack of imagination,” Klausen said, referring to the term first used by the 9/11 Commission report to explain the failures that led to that terrorist attack.“There was a complete failure to understand what the disruptions in the Middle East would mean in terms of the stability for Europe,” she said. “We cannot stabilize the Middle East if the entire Middle Eastern middle class moves to Europe. Who will be left? The extremists, the peasants, the poor people who can’t come out?“The effort to put up borders right now is displaying a terrific degree of myopia. All you do is push people into another country, and then that’s obviously in the long run not going to work out.” Klausen said.Lastly, because of the forces of globalization, the mass migration of refugees is a structural crisis many years in the making, she said. “I don’t think it can be prevented. There is only adaptation and adjustment.“Europe is faced with an urgent necessity to do exactly what most of the small countries in Europe do not wish to do — namely, to increase collaboration on the military front, to increase policing and domestic capabilities, [to create] an integrated police force [and] an integrated immigration and assessment of policy for the distribution of quotas,” Klausen said.Bhabha rejected the excuses proffered by some that sorting out the legitimate political refugees from the economic migrants and determining the nationality of stateless migrants is so monumentally difficult that relative inaction is justified.“These problems are solvable,” she said. “I do feel there’s a whole political-will issue here about the resources we allocate, about the creativity we invest in solving the problems.”The Migration Crisis September 2015 – As waves of refugees continue to flee war-torn countries for Europe, Jacqueline Bhabha, a professor at the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, discusses the crisis, which is testing the EU’s commitment to open borders and human rights. <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzwRg3LNEgY” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/hzwRg3LNEgY/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

Volunteers juice COVID testing at Beth Israel

Volunteers juice COVID testing at Beth Israel

first_img Tracking the coronavirus through crowdsourcing COVID-19 has changed the way we live. For a few, like Annie Cheng, it’s also practically changed where they live.“I have a completely different lifestyle now,” she said. “Pretty much the lab is my home.”Cheng, the lead technologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s molecular diagnostics lab, is among those toiling to transform it from a regular 7 a.m.‒5 p.m., five-day-a-week operation into one of New England’s foremost hospital-based testing centers for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.The lab has super-charged its capacity. It recently performed 1,000 tests in a day and can do as many as 1,500, an entire season’s worth of flu diagnostics. This has meant longer hours for everyone, new testing machines, and redesigned procedures to keep workers safe. But the real game-changer has been the influx of skilled volunteers from Beth Israel’s research labs, which were closed after social-distancing edicts went into effect.“Ordinarily, we have a small number of people in our clinical lab who do this [testing] work,” said Jeffrey Saffitz, chair of Beth Israel’s Pathology Department and Mallinckrodt Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School (HMS). “All of the basic science laboratories at Harvard Medical School and its hospitals have been closed down, so we have this large population of research techs and postdocs who run PCR machines all the time in a research setting. We put out a call and we were gratified to have a great response. It’s a story where our community of smart, incredibly committed people will do whatever it takes to stem this terrible tragedy.”The scramble began in mid-March, when the government allowed hospital labs to begin their own testing for SARS-CoV-2 instead of sending samples to centralized government facilities for results. The change came as U.S. disease numbers skyrocketed and what had been insistent calls for increased testing capacity rose to a shout.Beth Israel has two main labs that do its clinical testing. Officials decided that one, the molecular diagnostics lab, equipped with high-volume machines, would handle the COVID tests. The lab, however, was initially hamstrung by a lack of test kits that would allow its machines to check samples for COVID. The shortage was met by Aldatu Biosciences, a startup with roots in Harvard’s i-lab and Pagliuca Life Lab. Soon afterward, supplies from Abbott Laboratories, which makes the machines, began to flow.,As testing rapidly ramped up, the Beth Israel lab extended its hours until midnight. That lasted about a week, Cheng said, until lab managers realized that meeting COVID-19 testing demand meant running all day, all night, and over the weekend. The lab’s staff ballooned from two to 20 as volunteers arrived. Despite the volunteers’ familiarity with the work, they had to be trained on the specific machines and on sample preparation, and brought up to speed on procedures to keep themselves and their colleagues safe — such as transporting specimens by cart, not by hand, and following the one-way traffic flows through the lab to ensure people didn’t gather in any one location.Cheng said each day brings its own challenges. Medical emergencies are regular and require changes to testing schedules in order to provide results for specific critically ill patients. Though no technicians have been exposed on the job, one was exposed to COVID at home and spent two weeks in self-imposed quarantine. James Kirby, Beth Israel’s medical director of clinical microbiology and HMS associate professor of pathology, said once the lab’s capacity to test expanded, it became apparent there weren’t enough swabs to take samples from patients with COVID-19 symptoms or liquid media in which to transport the swabs to the lab.In response, they set up an in-house production facility to create transport media, but then were in danger of running out of test tubes until area research labs responded with donations. To increase the supply of swabs, Kirby said, they’re evaluating 3D printed swabs they could produce on site.“I’m amazed and proud of our lab technologists in general, and our new recruits are amazing,” Kirby said. “They enabled this high level of testing. It would have been impossible without this effort.”Since the crisis began, Kirby said, he’s essentially been working when not eating or sleeping. Similarly, Cheng said her days have stretched from 7 a.m. until 11:30 p.m., though she’s been able to leave at 8 or 9 recently as volunteers completed training. Cheng said she’s lucky because her kids are grown, giving her the freedom to devote as much time as necessary to what she, the volunteers, and others across the hospital view as a mission.“They know exactly what they’re doing and know what the job is,” said Erin Duffy of the volunteers. “They know they’re making an impact.” “Being able to do [work] that impacts people is a very humbling experience. It makes me feel very fortunate to have skills to be able to impact the community.” — Jihoon Lim How We Feel app uses big data analysis to help fill information gaps created by a testing shortage A time of need and a desire to help A day in the life of an ER doc It was that sense of mission that prompted Duffy to find work in the lab once her job as a research assistant doing DNA and RNA analysis on mammalian tissues was halted.“If I wasn’t doing this, I would just be sitting at home feeling like, ‘I wish I could help,’” Duffy said. “I definitely have the molecular biology skills. Those are translatable.”Duffy describes her 3 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. shift — which sometimes lasts until 1 a.m. — as a “mad rush” to get the samples prepared and into one of the high-volume machines that can process 92 samples at a time.“We’re really kind of running around all day,” said Duffy, who is planning to attend medical school in the fall. “It’s made me very grateful for the work those medical technologists do.”For Jihoon Lim, part of the battle initially was just getting there. Lim, who normally works in a Beth Israel lab exploring noncoding RNA, used to take the bus to work from his home in Jamaica Plain, but now avoids both the bus and the subway. When the research labs closed on March 18, Lim stayed on for a few days with Frank Slack, the lab’s principal investigator and the Shields Warren Mallinckrodt Professor at HMS, to make sure everything was closed down and stored properly.Lim told Slack he’d like to help with COVID testing, and Slack put him in touch with the hospital’s pathologists.“I’m living here in Boston by myself, and I thought I could help,” Lim said. “It’s definitely a rewarding experience.”,Lim settled on riding his bike the 10 to 15 minutes from Jamaica Plain to Boston’s Longwood area for his 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. shift. Like Duffy, he often stays late before pedaling home through the darkened, depopulated streets.Lim said his prior lab experience has been helpful, though policies and procedures are more rigid at the clinical lab, where people’s health depends on the results.“Being able to do [work] that impacts people is a very humbling experience,” Lim said. “It makes me feel very fortunate to have skills to be able to impact the community and to help people who are waiting for results — I’m sure they’re scared, and their families are too.”By early May, what began in mid-March as a mad scramble to get COVID-19 testing started and then rapidly — almost instantly — ramped up has become a steady grind. Though buoyed by the desire to meet COVID’s challenge, Cheng said the effort is nonetheless starting to wear on people.“I hope this virus doesn’t last forever,” Cheng said, “because everyone is tired.” Student volunteers find ways to make a difference amid the pandemic’s disruption and loss Third-year resident Anita Chary describes the personal and professional trials brought by the pandemic Relatedlast_img read more

Zahm House rector explores history, traditions of dorm

Zahm House rector explores history, traditions of dorm

first_imgEditor’s note: This article is one in a series profiling the dorms. Previous articles have covered dorms built before Zahm House.Built in 1937, Zahm House is hailed by its residents as the one of the most tightly-knit communities on campus.The dorm is named after Fr. John Zahm, a Notre Dame graduate, researcher and Notre Dame vice president. Among the 180 students who live there, the residential hall is affectionately called Zahm House rather than by its official name of Zahm Hall.“In the official books for Notre Dame, it’s Zahm Hall,” Fr. Matt Hovde, the rector of Zahm Hall, said. “The guys who live here will call it because of the familial sense they’re trying to cultivate. … This is actually supposed to be a brotherhood. The sense of the familial community here that guys are really trying to claim ownership of [is] more than a place that they pass through.”During World War II, when the University was facing a lack of students and a lack of funding, Zahm functioned as a barracks for the Naval Academy. The residence hall was reserved exclusively for naval officers. When the war ended, however, the building returned to housing Notre Dame students.Zahm tradition holds that the dorm formed its identity back when students were allowed to choose their residence halls on a yearly basis, based on their grades. Zahm was among the least desirable, the story says, so it housed those with lower grades, thus garnering a reputation as a more carefree dorm.“I don’t think [the story] is actually true, but it is propagated out there,” Hovde said. “It was one of the newer ones, so it doesn’t quite fit.”The Zahm mascot is a moose, though the various interhall teams sport different names, including “Zahm-bies,” the Rabbit Bats, Fear and Pain. According to Zahm tradition, the mascot came to be associated with Zahm after two students asked to take it from the trash of a Canadian ski lodge set to go out of business.“So [the students] couldn’t go skiing, but they did come back with a moose head, and they hung it up in the basement and it’s been there ever since,” Hovde said.Community service is the focus of Zahm House’s signature events: every fall the men of Zahm host a Halloween party for children with chronic illness, and every spring they plan and execute a carnival for the students and families at the Robinson Community Learning Center, a community learning center located in South Bend. Many Zahm residents volunteer at the center throughout the year and develop relationships with the staff, Hovde said.“We realized two years ago that we did nothing for students, so last year and the year before … we’re looking at Zahm-A-Palooza for an event, which is basically those things we do for the students in South Bend but available for Notre Dame students,” Hovde said.For Hovde, the best part about being the rector of Zahm is the students and the community they cultivate within the hall.“I think any rector would say [the best part] is the students,” Hovde said. “They want to do stuff with each other, and I think it’s really laudable that they want to celebrate each other. I think [they] deal with a little bit of a stigma being in Zahm, but I think it’s something that contributes to the closeness that guys get here. They wear a little bit of a badge of pride … My role as rector isn’t ever trying to create a sense of community, but to prune it [and] to cultivate what they are already doing … I’m a fan of Zahm.”Tags: dorm features, Zahm Houselast_img read more

Indonesian stocks, rupiah surge in recent weeks despite weak economic outlook

Indonesian stocks, rupiah surge in recent weeks despite weak economic outlook

first_imgIndonesian stocks and the rupiah exchange rate have soared in recent weeks as foreign investors flock to Indonesian assets and bet on a financial market recovery despite a bleak domestic economic outlook.The Jakarta Composite Index (JCI), the main gauge of the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX), jumped 2.48 percent on Monday to 5,069 points in line with its Asian peers, which booked increases following upbeat United States employment data. However, the index slipped 0.7 percent on Tuesday, with foreign investors buying Rp 275.01 billion (US$19.52 million) worth of stocks more than they sold.It has rallied by 8.75 percent in the last 30 days until Tuesday, after crashing by 16.76 percent in March only, IDX data showed. So far this year, the JCI has lost more than 20 percent of its value. Meanwhile, the rupiah exchange rate stood at 13,890 per US dollar on Tuesday, gaining around 5 percent since May 28 and 16.2 percent since March 23 when the currency fell to its lowest level since the 1998 Asian financial crisis. The rupiah, therefore, is back to its value prior to the COVID-19 crisis.The recent gains in Indonesia’s financial markets occurred as the economy was likely to slow further than expected this year. The World Bank in its Global Economic Prospect report published on Monday expected Indonesia’s economy to record zero percent growth this year from 5.1 percent projected in January.The government has estimated this year’s growth to reach 2.3 percent under the baseline scenario and even contract 0.4 percent in the worst-case scenario. The country’s first-quarter growth stood at 2.97 percent, the lowest in 19 years and below the government and the central bank’s expectations of around 4 percent.“While Indonesia’s economy will struggle this year, investors remain confident of the potential the country offers in terms of market size and growth,” said Fitch Solutions head of Asia country risk Anwita Basu, adding that efforts made by the central bank had stabilized financial markets. “Bank Indonesia has deployed multiple lines of defense against the rupiah’s weakness that has restored investors’ confidence in rupiah-denominated assets,” she told The Jakarta Post in an email correspondence on Monday.“Furthermore, if Indonesia continues the reform path, the country will likely benefit from supply chain diversification many companies are considering as a lesson drawn from the COVID-19 pandemic and overreliance on China.”Bank Indonesia (BI) decided to hold its benchmark interest rate at 4.5 percent in May despite room for easing as it worked to safeguard the rupiah exchange rate’s stability. The central bank has also bought up to Rp 166 trillion in government bonds in the secondary market during the first quarter of 2020 to stabilize the rupiah and another Rp 26.1 trillion to support budget financing needs, boosting the central bank’s ownership of government bonds to Rp 445.4 trillion.The rallies in Indonesian stocks and currency also supported foreign investors’ rising appetite for risky assets following the easing of COVID-19 restrictions in several countries, spurring hopes of a global economic recovery.Foreign investors bought Rp 8 trillion in Indonesian stocks throughout last month, Financial Services Authority (OJK) data show. However, they still recorded a net sell of Rp 7.56 trillion so far this year, according to IDX data.Indonesia’s sovereign debt market also saw an influx of foreign money last month as the OJK recorded a net foreign buy of Rp 7.07 trillion in May.“There is a gap between market rally and reality as investors bet heavily on economic recovery,” Mirae Asset Sekuritas Indonesia economist Anthony Kevin told the Post. “The current stock market rally is prone to correction as it does not reflect economic fundamentals.”The COVID-19 pandemic, which has upended the job market and choked the cash flows of micro, small and medium businesses (MSMEs), may not justify the current market rally, said Anthony.“In stark contrast, the surge of foreign inflow into the debt market is justified, thanks to low inflation and a stronger rupiah.”The central bank reported Rp 18.67 trillion in net inflows, mainly in sovereign debt papers, from the second week of May to the first week of June. From April 1 to May 14, BI recorded $4.1 billion in net inflows.Topics :last_img read more

McEnroe, Navratilova sorry for rules breach after Margaret Court protest

McEnroe, Navratilova sorry for rules breach after Margaret Court protest

first_img Read Also: Champion’s mindset propels Halep into Aussie Open semi-finals But that has been overshadowed by past controversies such as praising South Africa’s apartheid system, saying “tennis is full of lesbians” and describing transgender children as “the work of the devil”. McEnroe ridiculed Court as a “crazy aunt” this week, calling her comments “offensive and homophobic”, while Navratilova said her views were “actually hurting people”. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 “In this case, I was not aware of the Tennis Australia rules and protocol for issuing credentials. For that I apologise to Tennis Australia and recognise and appreciate the great job they have done to make the Australian Open a great event for the fans, players and myself.” Court, a record 24-time Grand Slam champion, has been honoured this week at the Australian Open for the 50th anniversary of her calendar-year Grand Slam. Promoted ContentBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of ArtTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All TimeWhat Is A Black Hole In Simple Terms?Couples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Top 10 Most Iconic Characters On TV8 Weird Facts About Coffee That Will Surprise You Loading… Tennis legends John McEnroe and Martina Navratilova apologised on Wednesday for breaking Australian Open protocols after their on-court protest targeting controversial Australian great Margaret Court. Australian great Margaret Court received a replica trophy this week The two Americans said sorry after unfurling a banner calling for a stadium named after Court – criticised over her deeply conservative views – to be renamed ‘Evonne Goolagong Arena’ after the three-time Australian Open winner. But they did not row back on their demand concerning Margaret Court Arena. “I got in trouble, I am sorry I broke protocol,” Navratilova said on the Tennis Channel. “I had no idea there was this kind of protocol. “Had I known, I would have done it differently. I would have still tried to make my statement, which is that you name buildings after not what people did on the court, but also off the court, the whole body of work.” McEnroe, who like Navratilova is doing media work and playing veterans’ doubles at the Australian Open, also said he wasn’t aware of the rules governing credential-holders. “Admittedly I was never one to study the rule book carefully or, for that matter, even at times abide by the rules,” McEnroe said in a statement, according to ESPN.last_img read more

England v Ireland to kick off World Cup Super League on July 30

England v Ireland to kick off World Cup Super League on July 30

first_imgIT has been delayed by a couple of months, but the inaugural ICC Cricket World Cup Super League will finally get going on July 30 when England and Ireland face off in the first of three ODIs in Southampton.Featuring 13 teams – the top 12 and Netherlands, who qualified by winning the ICC World Cricket Super League 2015-17 – the league will see each side play four home and four away three-match ODI series in a fixed timeframe, with the top seven sides apart from hosts India earning automatic qualification for the next 50-over World Cup, to be played in October-November 2023.Each team gets ten points for a win, five for a tie, no result or abandonment and none for a loss. The five sides failing to qualify directly will play along with five Associate sides in the World Cup Qualifier 2023, with two teams from the Qualifier making it to the ten-team World Cup.“The league will bring relevance and context to ODI cricket over the next three years, as qualification for the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2023 is at stake,” Geoff Allardice, ICC’s general manager (cricket operations), said in a statement. “The Super League gives cricket fans around the world even more reasons to watch as the drama of league cricket unfolds.“The decision last week to move the World Cup back to late 2023 gives us more time to schedule any games lost due to Covid-19 and preserve the integrity of the qualification process, meaning it will be decided on the field of play, which is important.”Ireland are already in England, and their preparations haven’t gone particularly well so far. After an intra-squad warm-up game on July 22, they lost to England Lions by seven wickets on July 26 – both matches were played at the Ageas Bowl, the venue for the three ODIs.“It’s a privilege to be playing in the inaugural series of the ICC Men’s World Cup Super League. It is obviously going to be a huge challenge taking on the team that won the World Cup just a year ago but we have prepared well and have taken confidence from our form over the early months of 2020,” Andrew Balbirnie, the Ireland captain, said in the ICC statement. “What is important is that we are getting back on the field. I hope international cricket’s return is steady during these challenging times.“I look forward to the Irish side putting on a good performance in the upcoming series as we start our campaign for World Cup qualification.”Eoin Morgan, meanwhile, said, “Given the situation, it will be quite different to the last time we played at home, when we lifted the World Cup at Lord’s, but it’s nice to be starting our journey for the next edition of the tournament.“I’m sure cricket fans all over the world will be excited to see white-ball cricket resume and we’re looking forward to the challenge. Ireland are a talented team who have shown over the years that they can beat the best on their day. We look forward to what promises to be an interesting series.”The three matches will be played on July 30, August 1 and August 4.last_img read more

Explosive rushing attack leads Cicero-North Syracuse to Section III Class AA repeat

Explosive rushing attack leads Cicero-North Syracuse to Section III Class AA repeat

first_imgWith eight minutes left in warmups, as Cicero-North Syracuse marched in a straight, two-by-two line toward the locker room, parents and fans cheered and raised signs. One read, “They Can’t Stop What They Can’t Catch: #2.”West Genesee couldn’t catch Jeremiah Willis with 3:29 left in the first half. As he turned the corner and raced up the left sideline, he too knew that he couldn’t be stopped. He had a chance. A chance for not only a 77-yard touchdown run, but also a chance to provide a spark for the Cicero-North Syracuse offense that had been lacking early in the game.As he passed cameras around the 15-yard line, he stuck out his left hand and pointed. He wouldn’t be stopped. And for the rest of the game, neither would the Northstars.“Don’t stop. Don’t stop at all. That’s why I was thinking, don’t stop,” Willis said, “because if I stop, the team stops.”His touchdown run extended the C-NS lead to 20-0, and the Northstars used three additional rushing touchdowns in the second half, cruising in dominating fashion and defeating West Genesee 40-0 in the Carrier Dome on Saturday night. The win gave C-NS the Section III Class AA championship for the second-straight season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Words can’t describe it,” quarterback Conner Hayes said. “You would think doing it a second time, it would feel the same, but it doesn’t. It feels better every time.”The drive after Willis’ touchdown, linebacker Josh Lawrence sacked West Genesee quarterback Tyler Cook twice. Combined with a delay of game penalty, the Wildcats found themselves with a third-and-38. They punted, and as the ball soared down the field, any hopes of a comeback traveled with it. The Wildcats had held their own for the first 22 minutes, but the “athletes on the field,” as Hayes said, began to take over.C-NS opened the scoring on a fourth-and-seven midway through the first quarter. Hayes took the snap and rolled to his right. As two West Genesee defenders rushed towards him, looking for the sack, fingers on the C-NS sideline began pointing down the field.A streaking Shy’rel Broadwater emerged behind two West Genesee defenders who bit on the scramble, and Hayes hit him in stride. The senior ran untouched into the end zone for a 44-yard score.With 9:49 left in the second quarter, Hayes faked a handoff to Jaiquawn McGriff, rolled to his left, and found a slanting Geloff for a 10-yard touchdown.These two touchdown passes helped overshadow a half where Hayes was intercepted twice by Christian Rossi, including his first pass of the game.“We started out a little slow,” Hayes said. “I threw that interception, but we came right back and just kept playing C-NS ball.”Hayes finished with 144 yards on 12-of-17 passing with two interceptions. But on Saturday, the Northstars’ offense didn’t need him to do anything extraordinary. The running backs had him covered.Early in the third quarter, McGriff took a handoff and sprinted toward the C-NS sideline. At the 20-yard line, when a Wildcats defender closed in, he swung his right arm over and juked to his right, and continued into the end zone for a 43-yard touchdown run that increased the Northstars’ lead to 27-0. Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 3, 2018 at 10:41 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @CraneAndrew Comments As the game’s MVP ran back toward the C-NS sideline, one of his coaches met him halfway, yelling “Hey, Hey, Hey, What? What? What? What?” in shock at the running back’s move.Minutes later he did it again, although this time without the Madden-esque juke. He took a handoff and ran up the gut into the end zone, causing “It’s All Over” chants to ring from the stands.“These kids are dialed in,” head coach Dave Kline said. “They have fun playing the game. You watch them? They have fun.”As the clock ticked down during the last plays of the game, with C-NS’s lead now 40-0 after a 43-yard run by Da-Ron Brown, Willis began to jump. He took off his helmet and began to run around the C-NS sideline pumping up himself, his teammates and the crowd.But as he lined up with the rest of the Northstars at midfield to shake hands with the Wildcats after the game, Kline, at the front of the line, motioned toward Willis.The senior needed to put his helmet back on. He had to stick to the C-NS way. The same way that led them into the state semifinals last season. The same way that allowed them to finish 9-0 in regular season play. And the same way they used Saturday night to advance and play Elmira.“One of our goals was the section championship,” Hayes said after the game. “But that’s not our final goal, I’ll tell you that.”last_img read more