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First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released

First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released

first_imgA large international consortium of researchers has produced the first comprehensive, detailed map of the way genes work across the major cells and tissues of the human body. The findings describe the complex networks that govern gene activity, and the new information could play a crucial role in identifying the genes involved with disease.“Now, for the first time, we are able to pinpoint the regions of the genome that can be active in a disease and in normal activity, whether it’s in a brain cell, the skin, in blood stem cells or in hair follicles,” said Winston Hide, associate professor of bioinformatics and computational biology at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and one of the core authors of the main paper in Nature. “This is a major advance that will greatly increase our ability to understand the causes of disease across the body.”The research is outlined in a series of papers published March 27, 2014, two in the journal Nature and 16 in other scholarly journals. The work is the result of years of concerted effort among 250 experts from more than 20 countries as part of FANTOM 5 (Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome). The FANTOM project, led by the Japanese institution RIKEN, is aimed at building a complete library of human genes.Researchers studied human and mouse cells using a new technology called Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE), developed at RIKEN, to discover how 95% of all human genes are switched on and off. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Two receive Roslyn Abramson Award

Two receive Roslyn Abramson Award

first_imgYa-Chieh Hsu and Durba Mitra have been named this year’s winners of the Roslyn Abramson Award, given annually to assistant or associate professors for excellence in teaching undergraduates.“I am delighted that Ya-Chieh Hsu and Durba Mitra are receiving this well-deserved recognition,” said Claudine Gay, Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science. “They are both deeply passionate about our teaching mission, and have demonstrated creativity, care, and real intellectual engagement in how they connect with students, both in and out of the classroom.”Hsu, the Alvin and Esta Star Associate Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, said the award is meaningful to her because she takes so much pride in her teaching.“Every year I try to challenge myself to teach some new lectures that are not directly related to my own expertise, but in an area that I felt important and really wanted to learn together with my students,” she said. “It is always fun and difficult at the same time. The news came when I was in the middle of preparing such a lecture, so it really felt like an encouragement.”Hsu is currently teaching “From Cells to Tissues, in Sickness and in Health,” a course that blends concepts from cell, developmental, and stem-cell biology. It begins by exploring the cellular and molecular processes involved in building tissue and concludes with lectures focused on exploring how diseases such as cancer arise when these systems fail.“This is an exciting area in which lots of important progress has been made, so the course is always evolving,” she said. “However, one thing we always focus on since the inception of the course is critical thinking. Every lecture, through lots of discussions, I always put a priority on not only teaching the concepts but also engaging students to think critically about these concepts and principles: How were these discoveries made? What conclusions can you draw based on the evidence provided? What is correlation and what is causation? How can you apply these principles to solve problems?”Mitra, an assistant professor of women, gender, and sexuality and the Carol K. Pforzheimer Assistant Professor at the Radcliffe Institute, is proud to have been selected for the award. But she is also excited about teaching three new courses this year, including “Global Feminisms,” which is part of the College’s newly revamped General Education program.“The course explores movements for sexual rights and feminist thought in historical and global perspective, using everything from music videos to political posters to diverse archives of memoirs, short stories, and scholarly books by international women, women of color, and queer and trans people,” she said.In addition, Mitra looks forward to offering “Solidarity: Transnational Women’s Rights from Suffrage to NGOs” in collaboration with the Schlesinger Library’s Long 19th Amendment Project, which focuses on the complex lives and politics of women in transnational perspective. Mitra will also be teaching “The Sexual Life of Colonialism,” a class that will examine marginalized sexual minorities, queer and same-sex sexualities, and race and sexuality in the colonial and decolonizing world.“These histories are vital and changing every day in our present, 50 years after the Stonewall Uprising here in the U.S., and in a moment today where people are organizing against gendered harassment and inequality, and laws against homosexuality are being challenged all over the world.”The Abramson awards were formally announced at a faculty meeting in May, with each recipient being awarded $10,000. The prize was established with a gift from Edward Abramson ’57 in honor of his mother. The recipients are chosen each year based on their accessibility, dedication to teaching and research, and ability to effectively communicate with and inspire undergraduates.Hsu says that the funding will help ensure that the work her students do in the lab will continue to flourish. “We constantly have undergraduates working with us during the academic year and summertime. The funds will provide the necessary resources to support their research projects and put what they learn in the course to practice.”Mitra plans to use the stipend to continue research on her upcoming book, which explores Third World feminist political thought during the second half of the 20th century. “I’m going to travel to many different archives and homes across South Asia, East and North Africa, and Southeast Asia to build alliances with scholars and activists, preserve endangered collections of women leaders, and research key organizations that produced novel ideas of sexual rights.”last_img read more

Food for thought

Food for thought

first_img The dietary factor During an interview with the Gazette, Andrés said that he remains closely involved with Harvard, despite a punishing schedule that includes opening Mercado Little Spain with Adrià and brother Albert Adrià, which The New York Times just called the city’s top new restaurant of 2019, because he believes in fostering the dialogue between the culinary and scientific worlds, but also because it’s important for students to see how food is connected to so many other realms from national security, the law and public policy, to public health, medicine, climate, history, and even moral philosophy.“You almost need an understanding of each sector to try to end some of the bigger problems of the world,” he said. If today’s students are to take on these issues, they need to see how it all fits together. “So that’s why we’ve been coming back, because it’s important to invest in that future.”Because food is so integral to daily life and is also a lens through which many of the biggest issues of our time can be understood, Andrés hopes one day to convince an academic institution such as Harvard to convene scholars, practitioners, and other experts who will consider food a serious interdisciplinary area of study, like humanities.“We are who we are thanks to the food. It gives us a purpose in life; it gives us a purpose on earth; it gives us an understanding of where we come from; it gives us an understanding of where we are,” he said, adding, “I do believe an institution like Harvard has to do more to bring food to the fore.”Just months after his first Harvard lecture, Andrés’ career took a new direction when a 7.0 magnitude earthquake hit Haiti. Inspired by the work of Paul Farmer, Harvard’s Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, Andrés brought his cooking and leadership skills to Port-au-Prince and began serving meals to hundreds, then thousands, who had been devastated by the disaster. That experience led to the establishment of World Central Kitchen, his small but high-impact nongovernmental organization (NGO), which prepares and serves food to victims of natural disasters worldwide.He advised students eager to tackle the world’s big problems, like hunger or the climate crisis, but unsure where to start to practice what they preach in their everyday lives and to direct some of their efforts toward making change in their own neighborhoods or communities, instead of shooting for the moon. Related ‘To be horrified by inequality and early death and not have any kind of plan for responding — that would not work for me’ Harvard to cut food-related greenhouse gas emissions “Sometimes some of the bigger problems on earth have very simple solutions, and sometimes the solution is stop talking and start doing,” said Andrés. “I didn’t begin thinking I was going to do 4 million meals in Puerto Rico, 2.5 million meals in the Bahamas as of this week, or half a million in Indonesia or 450,000 meals in Guatemala. We began with one very simple [goal]: Let’s just start feeding today one person. OK, maybe we feed an entire church. How many? Five hundred. … Once you do that, you see that then, actually, you can do more. Then you keep building on that.”Andrés, who has been critical of the slow, scattershot response by the U.S. government and by some of the larger disaster-relief organizations during the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas, said the overemphasis on planning and evaluation of a problem is one of the “biggest enemies of solutions.”“We need less assessments and more doing. Especially in the NGO world, there’s way too many assessments,” he said. “We need to have NGOs’ mentality [be] that their outcome is to be out of business because success means that you’re not needed. I know it’s easier to say than to do, but if we don’t have that purpose from the very beginning, it’s never achievable, and we need to start changing the rules of engagement.” Could a popular food ingredient raise the risk for diabetes and obesity? When Americans think of superstar chef José Andrés, most envision him either decked out in a stained, worn out vest, cooking and feeding thousands of victims of natural disasters in places like the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, or Haiti, or in his kitchen whites opening some hotly-anticipated new restaurant in his native Washington, D.C., New York, or Las Vegas.This week, however, Andrés put all that aside to judge a student science fair at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and to join food science writer Harold McGee in marking the 10th anniversary of the popular Science + Cooking course and lecture series. McGee’s essential bible, “On Food and Cooking”  became the course textbook, and both men have been instrumental in the program’s success.The course sprang unexpectedly from a 2008 Harvard visit by the legendary Ferran Adrià, whose groundbreaking, three-Michelin-star restaurant in Spain, El Bulli, helped inspire the molecular gastronomy trend, which was then a new, experimental approach to cooking that bucked tradition and conventional wisdom. Adrià spoke to physics students about what was still a novelty in kitchens and in classrooms: the science that underpins cooking. The talk proved so popular and inspirational that SEAS faculty David Weitz and Michael Brenner turned it into an undergraduate Gen Ed course featuring guest lectures by world-renowned chefs. Adrià and Andrés, who worked under Adrià early in his career, led the very first lecture in September 2010.It was at El Bulli where Andrés said he first saw how exciting and necessary it was to understand the science of food.“We began asking ourselves the bigger questions. Not only how to do the things … we started asking ourselves the why of the things that happened, and out of learning and out of the answers … we became so much more powerful because we had knowledge we never had before,” he said during his talk Monday.Andrés, who is also involved in immigration-reform advocacy, is clearly a person drawn to bigger questions. “Sometimes some of the bigger problems on earth have very simple solutions, and sometimes the solution is stop talking and start doing.” — José Andrés University signs Cool Food Pledge, vowing a 25% improvement by 2030 Paul Farmer on Partners In Health, ‘Harvard-Haiti,’ and making the lives of the poor the fight of his life The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

Taiwan offshore wind farm will be first to use Siemens Gamesa’s new 14MW turbine

Taiwan offshore wind farm will be first to use Siemens Gamesa’s new 14MW turbine

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享ReNews.biz:Siemens Gamesa has been lined up to deliver its new 14MW turbine for the 300MW Hai Long 2 offshore wind farm off Taiwan. The manufacturer said deployment of the 14-222 DD machine is also being considered for the other 744MW phases of the project.The exact number of units for the first 300MW stage of the project remains to be confirmed based on site-specific conditions and the preferred supplier agreement is subject to contract and final investment decision from the developer, Siemens Gamesa added.Hai Long is being developed by a consortium of Canadian independent power producer Northland Power and Taiwan-based developer Yushan Energy, which is jointly owned by Japan’s Mitsui & Co and Singapore’s Yushan Energy.Nacelle production for Hai Long 2 will start in Taichung in 2024, and turbine installation will follow thereafter, Siemens Gamesa said. The company said the nacelle production setup in Taiwan will play a central role in the introduction of the latest turbine technologies in Asia Pacific.Siemens Gamesa offshore chief executive Andreas Nauen said: “Taking the next step in advancing the Hai Long 2 project by announcing that it will conditionally use the 14-222 DD offshore wind turbine is outstanding news. We are thrilled that the Hai Long partners have chosen our newest machine, and are very excited to work closely in making this project the first installation of the 14-222 DD in Asia Pacific.”More: Siemens Gamesa secures first order for 14MW titan Taiwan offshore wind farm will be first to use Siemens Gamesa’s new 14MW turbinelast_img read more

Today is International Credit Union Day!

Today is International Credit Union Day!

first_img continue reading » 31SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Oct. 19 is International Credit Union Day, when credit unions remind their members that they can achieve their biggest goals in life with the theme “Dreams Thrive Here.”CUNA and the World Council of Credit Unions announced the theme for the 2017 event.“Credit unions improve the financial lives of their members every day of the year,” said CUNA President/CEO Jim Nussle. “International Credit Union Day is an opportunity to celebrate the credit union difference with our members and remind the world that credit unions are the best financial choice for consumers.”ICU Day—celebrated on the third Thursday of every October since 1948—is the one day every year the worldwide movement bands together to celebrate the spirit and philosophy of credit unions.Credit unions celebrate by offering refreshments and giveaways to members in their branches, and by getting out in their communities to do volunteer work and outreach.last_img read more

3 ways credit unions can flourish in the age of fintech disruption

3 ways credit unions can flourish in the age of fintech disruption

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Credit unions are sandwiched. On one side, they have the big banks, with their sprawling balance sheets, rock bottom cost of funds and deep reservoirs of resources. On the other side, they have to make sense of the disruptive FinTech upstarts that threaten to upend the banking model and consign sleepy backwater institutions to the outdated curiosities of history along with the internal combustion engine.It’s easy to get caught up in the predictions of the demise of small financial institutions. The number of credit unions in the US has declined by almost 30% during the last 10 years from 7,597 in 2010 to 5,354 as of June 2020.However, dig a little further, and we see that credit union membership in the US has grown by 3% per annum over the last 10 years, much higher than the country’s 0.75% annual population growth rate. continue reading »last_img read more

Cyclists await test results after coronavirus hits UAE Tour

Cyclists await test results after coronavirus hits UAE Tour

first_img“Tomorrow morning we will know the results. It’s gonna be a long night and we hope that everyone will come back home without any trouble,” it said in a statement on Twitter.The UCI, the sport’s governing body, released a statement saying the last stages were “cancelled late yesterday evening after two cases of coronavirus were suspected among two staff members of one of the participating teams”.”While waiting for the results of tests and their communication, the United Arab Emirates authorities, the event’s organizing committee and the UCI, by mutual agreement, took the decision to interrupt this event in the interests of the health of riders and their staff, and to avoid the virus spreading.”Britain’s Adam Yates, who had led the overall race after Thursday’s fifth stage, was declared the winner of the event after the final two stages fell victim to the new coronavirus outbreak.Second was Tadej Pogacar of Slovenia with Kazak Alexey Lutsenko third.”The final two days of racing are cancelled due to concerns around Coronavirus,” Yates’s Mitchelton team tweeted on Thursday.”Riders and staff remain in the hotel and will be tested shortly, with their health taking priority. We hope anyone affected makes a fast recovery.” Unprecedented move Meanwhile, Danish cyclist Michael Morkov of the Deceuninck–Quick-Step team, who took part in the first four stages of the UAE race, has been placed in isolation in his hotel room after arriving in Berlin to take part in the world track championships.”The UCI and the organizing committee [in Berlin] have been closely monitoring the situation in Abu Dhabi and its potential impact on the championships in Berlin,” said a spokesman, confirming the isolation of Morkov as “a preventative measure”.The cancellation of the UAE Tour came just a day after Italian golfers Edoardo Molinari and Lorenzo Gagli were quarantined in neighboring Oman over coronavirus fears before being cleared to play in the country’s European Tour event.Gagli had suffered flu-like symptoms and as Molinari, the older brother of former British Open winner Francesco, was his roommate, both were forced to withdraw from the tournament and placed in isolation as a precautionary measure.However, they were then cleared to play after the Oman health ministry reported that Gagli’s test results were negative.The UAE on Friday announced six more cases of coronavirus, taking its total to 19. It did not say if the two Italians were included in the new total.Gulf countries have announced a raft of measures to cut links with Iran to prevent coronavirus spreading, after infections emerged among people returning from pilgrimages to the Islamic republic, which is battling the deadliest outbreak outside China.Kuwait on Friday announced two more cases for a total of 45, and there were another two cases in Oman for a total of six. Bahrain reporting three new cases — all Bahraini women returning from Iran — pushing the total to 36.Saudi Arabia has no reported cases but has suspended visas for visits to Islam’s holiest sites for the “umrah” pilgrimage, an unprecedented move triggered by coronavirus fears that raises questions over the annual hajj. Cyclists including Britain’s Chris Froome awaited the results of coronavirus tests from their hotel lockdown Friday, after the UAE Tour was abandoned when two Italian staff members tested positive.”The decision has been taken to ensure protection of all the race’s participants,” the UAE Tour organizing committee said in a statement.It said the United Arab Emirates health ministry would screen all the race’s participants, administrative staff and organizers, and adopt measures “including quarantine” to prevent the spread of the disease. “It’s a shame that the #UAETour has been cancelled but public health must come first,” tweeted Froome, a four-time winner of the Tour de France.”We are all awaiting testing and will remain at the hotel until further notice. I hope those affected make a speedy recovery and there aren’t any further cases #coronavirus.”A total of 24 Italian cyclists started the race in the UAE. Italy is the hardest-hit country in Europe, with 650 people infected and 17 deaths.Italy’s Vini Zabu-KTM team said its riders had been tested already.  Topics :last_img read more

E-cigarette maker Juul plans layoffs, Europe and Asia exit: Report

E-cigarette maker Juul plans layoffs, Europe and Asia exit: Report

first_imgTroubled e-cigarette maker Juul plans to pull out of Europe and Asia and lay off more workers after already shedding a third of its workforce, the Wall Street Journal said Wednesday.The start-up could end sales in 11 countries including Italy, Germany, Russia, Indonesia and the Philippines, the paper said, noting the US, Canada and Britain accounted for 90 percent of its sales in the first quarter. That is expected to be accompanied by lay-offs, but no precise numbers have yet been announced. Since then, Juul has essentially stopped advertising or selling sweet or fruit-flavored products in the US and has pulled out of several overseas markets such as South Korea, Austria, Belgium, Portugal and Spain, as sales plummeted.It laid off almost a third of its 3,000 workers earlier this year, and now has a staff of around 2,200, the Journal said.In addition, in April the Federal Trade Commission moved to block a huge investment by competitor Altria, which owns the Marlboro brand, in Juul. Altria had spent $12.8 billion for a 35 percent stake in Juul in December 2018, valuing the start-up at $38 billion. Altria now values the company at $12 billion. Juul did not respond to an AFP request for comment late Wednesday.The labor cuts would allow the company to invest in developing new products, according to an email sent to staff by Juul CEO Kevin Crosthwaite.”While those investments will not provide short-term revenue, they will help us earn trust and build a company for the long term,” said Crosthwaite who took over the company a year ago.Juul was accused of illegally selling its products to underage consumers and of having targeted high school kids, unleashing a landslide of lawsuits.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Live the easy life in funky pad an easy commute from the city

Live the easy life in funky pad an easy commute from the city

first_imgThe home at 19/30 Melthorn Place, Bracken Ridge is on the market for offers over $369,000.THIS low-maintenance townhouse would make a great starter home or the perfect downsizer. Scott Matthies bought 19/30 Melthorn Place, Bracken Ridge, two-and-a-half years ago and has lived there ever since with his pet pug George. “It’s an easy home to live in and it’s in a nice little complex,” Mr Matthies said. The property was built in 2011 and has three big bedrooms, all with built-in wardrobes. The master bedroom has an ensuite, airconditioning and a private balcony.The main bathroom has a bathtub and separate shower and there is an third toilet downstairs. The home has three good-sized bedrooms and an ensuite.Mr Matthies said his home was adaptable enough to suit a range of people from those starting out, like he was, to those downsizing. “It’s got three decent-sized bedrooms and two and half bathrooms, so it would definitely be big enough for a small family or couple,” he said. The property is being marketed by Casey Flouch from Go Gecko Inner North for offers over $369,000.“This is your chance to buy a rare, well presented, spacious, funky townhouse in Bracken Ridge with all the hard work done,” Mr Flouch said. The kitchen is in the open plan living area.Mr Matthies said he was selling his spacious bachelor pad to take on a new challenge.“I want to buy an older house and do a bit of renovating,” he said. “I’m at the stage in my life where I’m ready to take on something bigger. “When I first bought this place I didn’t want to buy a unit and I wasn’t ready to take on a responsibility of a house. This was a good interim.”center_img There is plenty of room on the deck to host barbecues.The kitchen has plenty of storage, a dishwasher and rangehood while the open-plan living and dining area opens to the outdoor entertainment area. More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019“The back patio and deck area is probably my favourite spot in the home,” Mr Matthies said. “It’s nice and shady out there — it’s a good place for barbecues with friends.”last_img read more

People moves: UK railways scheme completes internal property team

People moves: UK railways scheme completes internal property team

first_imgRPMI Railpen – The investment manager for the UK’s £27bn (€30bn) railways industry pension scheme has completed its internal property investment team with the appointments of Alastair Dawson and Richard van Lente. Dawson joins as senior property asset manager from CBRE, where he was responsible for management of Harbert Management Corporation’s industrial assets. At Railpen he will be responsible for the day to day asset management of office and industrial assets. Van Lente joins as senior property asset and development manager from Market Tech, and will be responsible for the day-to-day asset management of a number of Railpen’s retail property assets. Rabobank Pensioenfonds – Theo Camps has been appointed independent chairman of the €24.9bn pension fund of Rabobank, which has recently switched from a paritarian board to a one-tier board. Camps takes over from deputy chairman Antoon de Hoon, who had chaired the pension fund since 1 May 2016, when Bert Bruggink, the former chief finance and risk officer of Rabobank, stepped down.Camps – a professor of organisational science and governance at the TIAS School for Business and Society at Tilburg University – had been executive chairman of consultancy Berenschot. He has also been supervisory chair of one of Rabobank’s regional branches and has co-chaired Rabobank’s governance committee, which unified Rabobank into a single Co-operative. AFM – Femke de Vries is to leave Dutch communication watchdog Autoriteit Financiële Markten (AFM) and join consultancy &samhoud as a senior partner as of 1 January. She said she wanted to broaden her experience to a more entrepreneurial role. De Vries, who joined the AFM in 2015, has been active in financial supervision for the past 15 years. Prior to her role at the AFM, she was secretary-director at supervisor De Nederlandsche Bank. De Vries is to stay on as extraordinary professor of supervision at Rijksuniversiteit Groningen.TOBAM – The “anti-benchmark” asset manager has appointed Frédéric Jamet as head of trading and co-head of research. Jamet is based in Paris, managing TOBAM’s teams across Paris and Dublin. He is a renowned academic in the field of factor and smart beta investment, with 28 years of asset management industry experience. He joins TOBAM from State Street Global Advisors France, where he had served as head of investments for eleven years. Before that he was head of the index equity unit for State Street.P-Solve – The fiduciary manager and investment consultant has poached Damon Hopkins from Willis Towers Watson, appointing him as associate director in its defined contribution investment consulting practice. Before Willis Towers Watson, Hopkins worked for companies including Mercer and JLT Benefits Solutions.Lazard Asset Management London – Lisa O’Connor has joined the firm as head of consultant relations for the UK. She was previously at AXA Investment Managers for around six years, as both European head and global head of consultant relations. AXA has appointed Manisha Patel to replace O’Connor as head of global consultant relations. She was previously head of UK consultant relations. She joined AXA IM in 2004, having  previously worked at the Government of Singapore Investment Corporation as an equity researcher.Legal & General Investment Management – Volker Kurr has been appointed head of Europe, institutional for LGIM. He has worked at the asset manager for the past four years as head of Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Sarah Aitken, head of distribution EMEA at LGIM, said his appointment would help drive the next phase of growth in institutional Europe, which includes establishing a small office in Frankfurt.Capzanine – The French private debt manager is opening an office in Munich in an effort to capture the momentum in the European direct lending market. Bertram Schütz has been appointed to lead its business in Germany. After 20 years at HVB/UniCredit Schütz switched to Avenue Capital Group in 2007, where he set up a direct lending strategy. Old Mutual Global Investors – Benjamin Hügli joined the asset manager this month as sales director for the DACH region (Germany, Austria and Switzerland). He is based in OMGI’s Zurich office, having previously been head of Switzerland at Foord Asset Management.ALFI Partners – Patrick Kern joined third party asset manager marketer ALFI Partners in late August. He will cover Austria, German-speaking Switzerland and Liechtenstein. He has previously held positions at Lazard Asset Management, REYL Asset Management, Bank Sarasin and ING Investment Management.Penfida – The corporate finance advice firm has appointed Deborah Gudgeon as a senior adviser. She joins Penfida from Gazelle Corporate Finance, where she was a managing director and provided independent advice to some of the largest UK and multinational defined benefit schemes. Gudgeon will advise pension fund trustees on all aspects of the employer covenant, corporate transactions, scheme funding negotiations and integrated risk management. She was the founding director of the special situations advisory team at BDO and a director in the corporate finance advisory business at Deloitte.Harvest Global Investments – The $114bn Asian specialist asset manager has made three senior appointments for its Hong Kong office. Winnie Wong is a fixed income portfolio manager at Harvest, having previously held roles at Royal Bank of Canada, Warburg Pincus, and Credit Suisse. Kathy Zhang was previously at Credit Suisse, and joins Harvest as China equity strategist. Kenn An will oversee product development at Harvest in his role as head of product. Kenn was previously head of product and marketing at UBS Asset Management in Hong Kong. FCA, RPMI Railpen, Rabobank Pensioenfonds, Autoriteit Financiële Markten, TOBAM, P-Solve, Penfida, Harvest, Lazard, AXA, Legal & General, Capzanine, OMGI, ALFI PartnersFinancial Conduct Authority – The UK regulator has unveiled the full membership of its new working group on institutional costs disclosure, led by Chris Sier.It comprises asset manager, institutional investor and consumer representatives, including: Stewart Bevan, cost transparency specialist at KAS Bank; Richard Butcher, managing director at professional trustee firm PTL and incoming chair of the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association; Iain Clacher, associate professor in accounting and finance at Leeds University Business School, and Ralph Frank, head of DC at consultancy Cardano and leader of campaign group the Transparency Task Force’s costs and charges section. Former shadow minister of state for pensions Gregg McClymont was unveiled as deputy co-chairman of the group last week, as was Jeff Houston, head of pensions at the Local Government Association. The group has been charged with developing a new framework for standardised asset manager disclosure of costs and charges to institutional investors. The full list of members can be found here.last_img read more